Home - , - LG G2 Coming to Boost Mobile Nov 21 for $279.99

LG G2 Coming to Boost Mobile Nov 21 for $279.99

Boost Mobile will be offering the LG G2 for $279.99 beginning Nov. 21. This news comes from the latest issue of The Beat, Sprint prepaid Group's monthly newsletter for Boost and Virgin Mobile dealers. The newsletter doesn't say whether Boost will be getting the 16GB or 32GB version of the G2 but it does show both a black G2 and a white one so presumably both colors will be available.

Launched in Nov, 2013, the G2 was LG's flagship until the release of the G3 this year. It's considered comparable the the Samsung Galaxy S4 and HTC One M7 and is notable for being the the smallest and lightest phone on the market with a 5.2 inch screen. It should perform nearly as well as Boost's current Android flagship, the $599.99 Samsung Galaxy S5 for less than half the price.

LG G2 Specs:

  • Screen 5.2" (1920 x 1080) Full HD IPS Gorilla Glass
  • CPU: Snapdragon™ 800 2.26 GHz Quad-Core
  • OS: Android™ 4.4.2, KitKat®
  • Rear-Facing Camera: 13 MP Full HD with Optical Image Stabilization, Autofocus, LED Flash and video capture up to 1920 x 1080 (60 fps; 30 fps default)
  • Front-Facing Camera: 2.1 MP Full HD with Camcorder 
  • Internal Memory: 32GB (Up to 24 GB for User Memory)
  • RAM: 2GB
  • Network: CDMA/EVDO 800/850/1900; LTE b25/b26/b41; GSM 850/900/1800/1900; UMTS 850/1900/2100; LTE CAT 3, HSPA+ 21 Mbps
  • WiFi: 802.11a/b/g/n
  • Bluetooth: 4.0
  • NFC: supports Google Wallet and Android Beam for sharing files
  • QRemote™: Control compatible TVs, Blu-ray™ players, cable provider set-top boxes, and more via infrared.
  • Status LED: Colored and patterned light for alerts like alarms, calendar reminders, new messages, missed calls, etc.
  • Hearing Aid Compatibility: M3/T4-2011
  • Battery: 3,000 mAh, Up to 17 hours and 40 minutes talk time
  • Dimensions: 5.45" (H) x 2.79" (W) x 0.35" (D)
  • Weight: 5.04 oz
Source: HowardForums

Tags: ,

30 comments:

Comment Page :
  1. HOFO ID. Grateful4adviceNovember 17, 2014 at 12:03 PM

    Awesome news. I wish Sprint would sell a family plan through Boost and Virgin similar to Cricket.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sprint coverage is terrible... what, 30% of the country. half of the Verizon and ATT coverage? But I want a lot of data, so I put up with it because I get so much data at a low price.

      My wife, however, wants coverage more than data, so a family plan with that uses one of the two covers-so-little carriers is out of the question. I've got her on a Verizon MVNO. The data prices are astronomical compared to Virgin Sprint, but the coverage is astronomically better than Virgin Sprint.

      Delete
  2. Great features. I especially like the HD IPS screen. Not even my monitors at work/home have IPS. It appeasr to have the same long-lasting battery as the LG Volt.

    If you would like to stay more informed about the Sprint Prepaid Group brands, including Boost Mobile, Sprint Prepaid and Virgin Mobile, you can visit:

    http://wholesale.vipwireless.com

    Toward the bottom of the page, you will see two links for The Beat, one in english and the other in spanish.

    Also, if you ever wanted to become a Sprint Prepaid Group dealer through VIP Wireless, you can do so here:

    http://wholesale.vipwireless.com/signup.php

    HELLS_BELLS

    ReplyDelete
  3. Nice specs, but the battery appears to be non-removable (a major design flaw) and it has the quirky, bad placement of the volume buttons.

    On the plus side, it has a micro-SD slot. A design no-brainer that not all flagship phones get.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The US market versions of the LG G2 don't have an SD slot.

      Delete
    2. Changing the battery is fairly straight forward and easy. Don't fret it. There are lots of good youtube tutorials out there to show you how. The battery will also last a really long time, so unless the battery is at end of life, you probably won't be replacing it anyway.

      Delete
  4. Ah. I wondered about that, I saw some conflicting info, and made the wrong assumption it appears. I found that the Korean one had an easily removable battery, but the US one had a very hard to remove battery, too.

    I do like the performance specs and size, but the design flaws (volume button placement, difficulty of removing the battery, and now lack of a micro-SD slot) are kind of deal killers for me. I'd pay a $100 for a phone with detracting mistakes like this, but not full price.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have a T-Mobile G2. It took me about two days to get used to the volume buttons on the back and with 24GB of free internal storage I don't miss the SD card. The battery lasts all day so I have no need to swap batteries.

      Delete
  5. Wow. I'm used to volume button placement that takes 2 seconds to get used to, not 2 days. The nonremovable battery and SD cost-cutting flaws we will agree to disagree on. I've used both kinds of phone, and have learned to avoid the badly designed ones (cheap cost-cutting as described above) at all costs. The G2 has some bad ideas that should have never made it off the drawing board.

    Samsung is able to make flagships phones without the above flaws.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Samsung may make phones without the above "design flaws" but they have plenty of other "design flaws" too (e.g. poor RF reception, low value-added bloatware). But in actuality these are not design flaws; these are subjective characteristics that differentiate different OEMs. What's good for one person may not be good for another. That's why it's nice to have such a wide range of OEM options when it comes to Android phones.

      Delete
    2. " But in actuality these are not design flaws"

      One very well could be, if the chose to place the antenna where it is well hidden and blocked. Bloatware, while similar to a "flaw" is more generally an unfortunate decision. It might make business sense in Samsung's business model.

      Another example of a design flaw is the ANKER extended battery for the Galaxy S3. Rather than being thick with the same footprint, they made it wide and spread out, so it completely blocked reception of the LTE/3G, Wifi, and GPS radios. It turned the phone into something like an 10 year old iPod that only transferred stuff using a wired tether.

      Like a phone that makes it hard to change the battery, this is a clear and objective design flaw. It is a real stretch to imagine the benefit of either design, especially when the person defending any of these flaws can't come up with any good reasons to defend them, and instead flares up in a kneejerk, reactionary fashion and tosses meaningless playground insults around.

      Delete
    3. Unfortunately you are missing out on a great phone then at a phenomenal price. There is nothing badly designed about it. I have used many different phones, including this one, and I can tell you, it does not disappoint.

      Delete
    4. Hi "unfortunately".

      I have an S3. The G2 doesn't seem that much better/different to justify a change.

      Delete
  6. All this talk about non-removable batteries as a "design flaw" -- it is a flaw from YOUR most preferred phone design... but that doesn't actually make it a design flaw -- it just makes it a characteristic of the phone you don't like. Calling it a design flaw is arrogant and patronizing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is a design flaw... objectively. It makes something worse, and doesn't make something better.

      There is no "arrogance" involved.

      Delete
    2. Not sure where the "objective" part is. Having a non-removable battery allows the manufacturer to optimize some other part of the hardware. (Different OEMs optimize hardware differnetly, so it is hard to make an absolute statement as to what the optimization tradeoff is.)

      The "arrogance" is your inability to even entertain the plausibility that something that is different from YOUR ideal preferences could actually have postivie value to anyone else. In other words, your response to my comment was as arrogant as your original comment.

      Delete
  7. Since the first comment wasn't arrogant at all, the response wasn't either.

    Some design choices are objectively bad. I note that you didn't list any actual benefits of having a "non removable battery" (which really IS "removable", but it takes a long time and you need several tools, while risking wrecking the phone) compared to one that is easily and simply removed with little effort and no tools.

    It is easy to make an absolute statement in some cases, like this.

    I'm reminded of a design blunder of past decades. Apple chose on its Macs to require a person to jam a paperclip into a tiny hole in order to eject a floppy. PCs (and even the declining C-64s etc of that era) had a very easy to press button or lever for ejection of media. One is much harder than the other, and there's no advantage or "good trade off" from the bad design.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't feed the battery troll. We all get dirty and the troll likes it. This one never learned the easy, regular way to eject the Mac floppy.

      Delete
    2. Don't feed the "Bad design is better" troll. Or the one above that thinks jamming bent wire in a pinhole is easier than pressing a nice friendly button (the only "regular, easy way" to do this),

      ... and apparently would be consider in upgrade if your TV remote required 45 minutes and 6 tools in order to take the hatch off and replace the battery.

      Delete
    3. Smart people just dragged the floppy icon to the Mac trash can, and saved the paper clip for a very rare manual eject. Only ignorant trolls used the paper clip every time.
      The Dumb Operating System always required a physical button push.

      Delete
    4. The physical eject button, which all better systems had (and have) is far better than obscure GUI commands. And the Mac method failed a lot..or else there would never been a pinhole.

      Your trolling in defense of bad user-hostile design has gone far far afield of discussing the G2. I guess things get boring in Mom's basement.

      Delete
  8. so Dennis does this mean that Boost Mobile will get the G3 or th e G4 for next year as well as any other new flagship phones like the Samsung Galaxy Note series or the HTC One series?

    ReplyDelete
  9. Boost mobile needs to get the Blackberry Q10,Z30, Passport, and Classic. I know plenty of people who would pick these up, including me. I want that Blackberry Classic

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry but blackberry is almost dead. It's not worth investing in their handsets. It just doesn't sale. I'm not saying they make a bad product, its just not selling.

      Delete
    2. I'd strongly consider getting the BlackBerry Passport if it were a native Android device. I don't want any legacy Blackberry OS stuff dragging it down.

      Delete
    3. Classic BB OS may be dying (except in the 3rd world), but QNX OS / BB10 certainly is not. QNX leads in the connected car market for good reasons. And there is no rational business reason for RIM to lower security and usability of a BB10 device by using a crude-by-comparison operating system that turns a BB into a commodity device. Is your killer app is a bad game (or 1000000 of them), or do you just enjoy the thrill of using a device that hackers prefer for good reasons? The last thing we need is more junky Chinese commodity hardware running Android. It's bad enough that a few BB are made there now...

      Delete
    4. Take away the games, and Android (along with IOS) has run away with the productive useful apps, also. Blackberry is legacy now, with its share plummeting this year. Especially as IT departments abandon it. And BB10 is most definitely crude-by-comparison compared to Android (and of course IOS). Running Android well would increase the usability of the Passport greatly.

      I'm not sure where your bigotry against the Chinese is going, but I doubt that has any sort of place here. As for "junky", I wonder if you realize that the highest quality smartphones are also made in China. You seem to know little outside the sinking ship that is BB.

      You do have an excellent point on QNX. However, that shows strength entirely outside of the phone/etc area.

      Myself, I want this phone for the keyboard. It seems to be the only non-dumbphone out there right now with a keyboard. That's a huge strength. Too bad it is cluttered with legacy stuff it is better off without. Hardware wise, it is a pleasant surprise.

      Delete
    5. I guess you're right. Might be a good shot at giving the Classic or Z30 a shot on boost. The Curves that were available before sold really good despite not being the best phones. Blackberry 10 is 10x better than OS7

      Delete
  10. The $280 is still a bid high, even when compared against the original MSRP of the LG G2.

    You look at the Sharp handset on Boost that is going for $150 and then ask yourself is all the extras and better features of the G2 really worth an extra $130?

    For me, the most I would pay for the LG G2 is $220 or I will go with the Sharp handset. If I was in the market today, I would try to get a LG Volt for $40 during Black Friday but I don't think that will happen since supplies are generally limited.

    I don't talk a lot, less than 100 minutes a month, but I could really use the 5GB or 10GB since I surf the web a lot. There is a Sprint 3G tower near my house (in Sacramento, CA) so if I walk 800 to 1000 feet towards the tower, I can get pretty good download speeds north of 1 mbps. Well that was true when I had Virgin Mobile.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow they must have not done the upgrade yet. Where I live in getting an average of 32 mbps

      Delete
Comment Page :