Home - , , - Sprint Prepaid Plans Get Rollover Data if Activated at BestBuy

Sprint Prepaid Plans Get Rollover Data if Activated at BestBuy

Sprint announced yesterday that for an unspecified limited time, Sprint Prepaid customers who purchase and activate a phone at Best Buy will get rollover data.

Sprint calls the new feature Monthly Rolling Data. Unused data rolls over from one month to the next and never expires. Customers are limited to a maximum of 30 GB of unused roll over data.  After 30 GB is accumulated, rollover stops until the customer uses some of their rollover data. The user's account must be current and payments on time or data will not roll over. Add-on Data Packs will be used before plan or rollover data and will not roll over.

Although T-Mobile Prepaid and AT&T's GoPhone also offer rollover data, Sprint Prepaid's has a couple of advantages:
  • Unlike AT&T GoPhone and T-Mobile Simple Choice which only offer rollover data on higher priced plans, Monthly Rolling data is available on all Sprint Prepaid plans, which start at $35/month.
  • Sprint Prepaid's rollover data never expires, GoPhone's expires after a month and T-Mobile Prepaid's after a year.
According to Prepaid Reviews.com, customers who purchased and activated Sprint Prepaid phones at BestBuy begining May 31, 2015 will get Monthly Rolling Data automatically. Customers who purchased and activated a phone at Best Buy before May 31 can call Sprint Prepaid to have Monthly Rolling Data added to their plans.

Sprint Prepaid offers the following plans:
  • $35/month - Unlimited Talk & Text and 1GB of data
  • $45/month - Unlimited Talk & Text and 3GB of data 
  • $55/month - Unlimited Talk & Text and 6GB of data
Sprint Prepaid allows customers to use their phones as mobile hotspots at no extra cost. Another good thing about Sprint Prepaid is that all plans come with 50 minutes of off network voice roaming per month. That could be useful if you break down along one of the long stretches of major highways that don't have Sprint coverage. On the other hand, T-Mobile Prepaid, which has a swiss cheese coverage map similar to Sprint's, has long offered unlimited off-network voice and text roaming.

The addition of rolling data strikes me as an attempt to breathe new life into the uncompetitive priced, and likely under performing, Sprint Prepaid brand. The amount of high speed data included with Sprint Prepaid plans is lower than comparably priced plans from Cricket, MetroPCS and even Sprint's own Boost Mobile. To make matters worse, unlike its main competitors, data on Sprint Prepaid is hard capped. When you reach the 1, 3 or 6 GB limit data stops, there's no ultra slow unlimited throttled data to carry you through to the next plan month. Rollover data at least makes running out of data less likely.

In other Sprint Prepaid news, after nine on-time payments, Sprint Prepaid customers can switch to a Sprint postpaid smartphone lease with zero down and no credit check. Like Monthly Rolling data this promotion is available exclusively at Best Buy. The main advantages of Sprint postpaid over Sprint Prepaid seem to be more off-network roaming, including a tiny bit of data roaming, and the availability of a wider selection of higher end phones at a higher monthly cost.

Sources Sprint, Prepaid Reviews

Related Post: Sprint and Sprint MVNO Prepaid Plans Compared

57 comments:

Comment Page :
  1. I just can't get excited over this. Cricket has unlimited voice, text, and 2.5G of data for $35 (with autopay). They also have a better network. Sure, there is no rollover, but they give nearly double the data at all price points. I guess if you had a weird usage pattern of not using much data most of the year, and then needing a ton for a month or two, it'd work great for you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. One word for such promo's at a time when Sprint needs to really up-their-game to Survive:
    AssBackwards!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Sprint prepaid pays are garbage. 1gb for 35 dollars a month. When you can get 2.5gb on cricket for the same price. No thanks sprints

    ReplyDelete
  4. Agreed that Cricket is a better deal all around, but the good thing about plans like this is that they are competition nipping at Cricket's heels, preventing them from backsliding on price or features.

    It seems that AT&T has designed their Cricket so that it does not appear to step all over their more lucrative propaid offerings. By giving Cricket separate stores and throttled high speed service, meaningless advantages, they are able to keep the propaid crowd subsidizing our cheap prepaid Cricket service. We Prepaid Nerds are happy; the Propaid Yokels are OK with paying more for what they perceive as a premium product, and AT&T stockowners love the multiple income streams. A Win-Win-Win ... Brilliant!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How is your DATA connection with CRICKET? Is it true ( from what has been written from other users) that some CRICKET phone calls don't go through because AT&T is prioritizing the calls made by regular AT&T customers? Have you experienced any such issues? THANKS!

      Delete
    2. @ OldNorseBruin: We are on Cricket on a 4G ATT tower at our homestead in rural Alaska, and typically see anywhere from 1 to 3 MB download, 1 to 2 MB upload on Cricket. Even these slow speeds are perfectly usable. Stuff loads fast, and video streams well.

      The tower is just one of a string of towers up and down the main highway from Fairbanks to Anchorage that AT&T built out to maintain continuous service for folks driving the highway, so we never have any delay in sending or receiving calls. When I'm in L.A., I have occasionally noticed delays calling out, but it's really impossible to know whether regular AT&T customers are seeing similar delays due to congestion, or whether they are getting thru preferentially.

      Delete
    3. "How is your DATA connection with CRICKET?..."

      When I had Sprint-based coverage, I had no data at all, except for some isolated spots, where I got something like between 1 mbps and 2.

      I switched to Cricket, and I get coverage with 6 - 8 mbps data speeds, all over, except in some isolated spots. I've received a handful of dropped calls, but I'm pretty sure these were do to accidentally pressing the hangup button..

      Delete
    4. @ ANONYMOUS 06/04/3:39A.M.:
      " When I had Sprint-based coverage, I had no data at all..."
      I empathize with you; "I feel your pain!"...I was on Virgin Mobile for way too long!

      Delete
    5. Why complain about OldSprintHistory with your ex-Boost and Virgin service that is not relevant today? Just to boost Cricket again?
      Sprint replaced all the 3G network equipment and deployed a new LTE network to 280M people. They re-farmed almost all of the Nextel 800 MHz spectrum. Network Vision delays are just a bad dream now.
      Sprint still has the slowest data network, but it's not the network you knew back then, by any stretch. Their call and text performance is up significantly.

      Delete
    6. Sprint coverage was terrible in my own personal experience as recently as December. The Nextel towers in the area must have been cannibalized for metal or something... there was no improvement at all after they were repurposed.

      Did Sprint so quickly become good in 5 months? Friends who still have it tell me how bad it is. I tell them to go to anything AT&T or Verizon based (Cricket is just one choice). If they do, they will see a huge difference.

      Delete
  5. As I was perusing this article, I was looking for the DEAL MAKER/BREAKER: Is there a hard cap for DATA?
    The third sentence in the penultimate paragraph says it all "...data on Sprint Prepaid is hard capped."
    How exactly does SPRINT think that it can compete when there are scores of MVNOs that offer not only better choices of phones, but also run on better networks? ( I was on Virgin Mobile; so this is from past experience...) DUH!!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. would rather use sprint prepaid or any other mvno, but will never want to have a ghetto cricket phone. cricket will never outlive its old reputation.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have no idea how a mobile operator can be "ghetto".

      They all have customers who are unfortunate enough to live in impoverish, segregated neighborhoods. What does where other customers live have to do with how well a cell phone provider meets your needs.

      Delete
    2. Dennis, I can tell you from personal experience, some use the word "ghetto" to mean subpar or lower in quality, not to refer to the the type of people that purchase Cricket's service.

      Delete
    3. Good call on "ghetto", Dennis. I know that most people don't want to be bigoted, and a gentle reminder is all that is necessary to make them realize that they DID use a term that they didn't really. Personally, I appreciate these reminders, because, who wants to be like that, anyway?

      Delete
    4. "I have no idea how a mobile operator can be 'ghetto' "

      Unfortunately, Dennis, racist code-words can creep into these discussions as well as anything.

      Regardless, I am a Cricket customer with no regrets. I wouldn't like twice at the locked-in phones they sell (as with other non-BYOP offerings from others). But doing the BYOP thng makes it so easy to avoid the specific Cricket-offering phones. Those who go to Klan meanings can get BYOP so they won't get kicked out for having a Cricket logo on their phone.

      Delete
  7. Ignore the ghetto comment. But Cricket is fine for most. No trouble calling and data is fast enough for Netflix Nuff said

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anon: Exactly. I can stream Hulu and Netflix on the Cricket LTE. I've been told that this Cricket LTE speed is terrible compared to the 12 MBPS or higher you can get with T-Mobile in 10 or so counties in the US.

      But when I ask what you can do with 12 MBPS (super fast T-Mobile) that you can't do with Cricket 8 MBPS, I am always met with *cough* crickets

      Never mind that for the vast majority of the US, that T-Mobile user will get 0 MBPS (no coverage) or just 2G.

      And now I know that racists hate Cricket for its "ghetto" connotations.

      Delete
    2. Since when was Cricket the "young / urban" brand? I thought that was Boost.

      Delete
    3. @Anon who says "Never mind that for the vast majority of the US, that T-Mobile user will get 0 MBPS (no coverage) or just 2G."

      I guess all the blog posts here and elsewhere chronicling T-Mobile's rapid deployment of LTE throughout their service footprint are all incorrect, misleading or downright lies. Yes, the United States is a big ass country. However, the majority of people concentrate in and around cities. Guess what? That's where T-Mobile is, too!

      Delete
    4. If the promises on the maps are true, T-Mobile will be hugely better by the end of the year. But even when I call T-Mobile shops, all I get are evasion. Also, you said " T-Mobile's rapid deployment of LTE throughout their service footprint..." which is still problematic, since their service footprint (as of the beginning of the year) is still rather small. Really fast poor coverage is better than 2G poor coverage, but not by much.

      "However, the majority of people concentrate in and around cities. "

      T-Mobile, at the beginning of the year, didn't bother with most cities.

      "Guess what? That's where T-Mobile is, too!"

      But their name contains "mobile" As much as T-Mobile might hate it, people do get mobile with their devices. And when they do, they quickly find that the "big ass country" is well covered by the big two, and T-Mobile is but a whisper and a rumor. Something seen in TV ads but not experienced. Face it, T-Mobile coverage is lousy now (and merely making things faster inside their small "service footprint" won't solve a thing), no matter what sort of "coverage doesn't matter" excuses are given. The much better networks don't have to make excuses.

      Delete
  8. Sprint did not do a good job with the pricing given the rollover feature: $35 for 1 GB, $10 more for an additional 2 GB, and another $10 for an additional 3 GB.

    Suppose you are a person where the $45 plan works for you. Over 12 months, you would pay $540 for 36 GB of data.

    Due to the kink in pricing, e.g. 5 months at $55 and the remaining 7 months at $35, you would instead pay $275 ($55 * 5) plus $245 ($35 * 7) for a total of $520. In return you would get 30 (6 * 5) GB plus 7 (1 * 7) GB for a total of 37 GB.

    The second approach would save the person $20 per year ($520 vs $540) while getting an extra GB (37 vs 36). I would alternate between $35 and $55 to maximize my data needs as opposed to paying a flat $45 a month.

    Btw, I had Virgin Mobile for 2 years and the main reason I would NOT return to the Sprint prepaid network is the 3G adaptive technology for video downloads. The videos ended up being too pixelated to watch. If Sprints wants to be competitive in the prepaid market, they have got to eliminate the 3G adaptive technology. It's our data, we paid for it, and let us have 4G download speeds (or capped at 8 MB like T-mobile or Cricket).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Btw, I had Virgin Mobile for 2 years....:"

      I had it for 4 years, and would not go back because the coverage was terrible compared to AT&T and Verizon. Isolated towers and coverage from Sprint, compared to entire areas blanketed with the others.

      Delete
    2. "Sprint Prepaid Plans Get Rollover Data if Activated at BestBuy"

      This is right after another item in which Sprint did a promotion only through certain specific dealers and NOT Best Buy. Yeah, the dealers that for the most part have much worse customer service than Walmart and Best Buy (very limited hours), and which Sprint makes hard to even look up on their own web site.

      Why can't they be consistent and simply let these deals be offered at any store that sells Sprint ????

      Delete
    3. Store exclusives are for the brand and store's benefit. The deal drives increased traffic to BestBuy. In return for the exclusive Best Buy likely agreed to promote Sprint Prepaid in some way such as advertising, more prominent product placement, guaranteed minimum orders or maybe just not dropping the under performing Sprint Prepaid brand.

      Delete
    4. Dennis, in the article you say that the phone needs to be purchased and activated at Best Buy to get the rollover data. I just purchased a Sprint prepaid phone 2 days ago online from another store; the model is not available at Best Buy. I have not activated it yet. If I go to Best Buy to activate it, will I still get the rollover data, or did it have to be PURCHASED there also? And would Best Buy even activate it for me since it was not purchased there?

      Delete
    5. I'm sorry but I don't know the answer to that. I suspect Best Buy would activate it for you as there's likely a comission for doing that. But you need to ask a Best Buy about whether you would get the rollover or not.

      Delete
  9. Data on Cricket is good enought to do whatever you want. You dont need 20 down and 10 up ok. calls are good too. I have cricket for a year now and have no issues.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "You dont need 20 down and 10 up ok"

      There are some T-Mobile partisans who passionately defend these high data speeds, like they are deal breakers for them. I suppose these folks "need" this data. I am open minded enough to find out what usages make these speeds necessary, and have asked several times. No one can name anything, yet.

      Delete
  10. They are people who use their cell phone as hotspot and rooted it and they are people who used their cellphone to download torrents and used it as their main internet at home and away. They try to circumvent the cellphone for their own good. These people need to get a life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No where did you indicate that they are trying to use advertised data that they didn't pay for. Perhaps if anyone needs to "get a life",it is those who are offended (apparently) at the idea that someone who pays for 3GB/etc a month wants to usethe 3GB/etc that they paid for.

      After all, they have every right to use data "for their own good" that they paid for. Or are someone who gets bent out of shape, say, if someone buys a package of Oreo's and dares to eat all of the cookies in the package?

      Delete
    2. I think you missed his point. Nobody should feel sorry for someone who violates the ToS ban on hotspot and gets blocked. Or the person who tries to take advantage of the data billing delay to watch a movie on the last day of the plan month and gets stopped. Like stuffing a second box of Oreos in your pants so you won't have to pay for them, just because you bought one box. Stealing and cheating is not OK just because you found a way to get away without being caught. Stealing and cheating is wrong, even when it's done by moral relativists.

      Delete
    3. Personally, I feel TOS terms blocking hotspot are unreasonable and if it weren't for corporate money corrupting the political process would probably be illegal.

      Ignoring unlimited data for a moment, if you buy 1 GB of data, you bought it, you own it and you should be free to use it any way you want. Banning hotspot is like a grocery store selling you a dozen eggs and telling you you can do anything you want with them except make omelets.

      "Unlimited" data is a lie that makes nonsense like hotspot bans and restricting plans to specific devices necessary. Mobile data is a limited by available spectrum and current infrastructure. No carrier can give you truly unlimited data because it doesn't exist. Carriers advertise the impossible "unlimited" and then come up with ways to limit its use.

      Delete
    4. Banning hotspot use may be unreasonable, but no one forces you to enter into that agreement. Pick another carrier if you don't like the prepaid 'contract' terms.

      Delete
    5. The hotspot banning is likely to "encourage" people to not use up all of their allotments. This of it this way. If you could somehow use your unlimited talk minutes for your home phone as well you would be costing the MVNO (or sprint in this case) more money. When you don't have complete freedom over how you can use something, you will use less of it, costing the company less in the long run. So it does make sense from a business standpoint about restricting tethering on these plans. From a consumer standpoint it does not.

      Delete
    6. So, then "no problem" with ignoring that part of the agreement on hotspots.... and using some of the dozen eggs you bought to make an omelette. Even if there's a ridiculous clause buried in fine print that no one sees to not make omelettes.... erm. use hotspots.

      After all, you've already paid for it. No need to pick another carrier. If you can do it, use it.

      Delete
    7. I got all the points completely. but where there are invalid or a real stretch, I am free to reject these points, which I understand, as invalid. Basically, I understand the points far better than the person who is falsely accusing people of using the services they paid for of "cheating and stealing".

      "Nobody should feel sorry for someone who violates the ToS ban on hotspot and gets blocked."

      Dennis B. addressed this quite well.

      "Or the person who tries to take advantage of the data billing delay to watch a movie on the last day of the plan month and gets stopped."

      If the billing system allows this, then there is absolutely nothing wrong with this "watch a movie":. They are using the data they paid for as allowed by the carrier. And as you are such a stickler on the ToS: there is no way in h*ll there is any provision in any TOS anywhere to tell people they can't use the data they paid for on the last day of a billing cycle. (A company that stops you like this should have their pants sued off).

      "Like stuffing a second box of Oreos in your pants so you won't have to pay for them,"

      Nothing like that. Your analogy is 100% inappropriate, as it involves theft. Which you are somehow trying to equate with people paying for something specific (prepaid, after all) and using it.

      "... just because you bought one box."

      The only way your analogy starts to come close is if you pay for 2 boxes

      "Stealing and cheating is not OK...."

      Apples and oranges. The use situations involve people using what they paid for.

      "Stealing and cheating is wrong, even when it's done by moral relativists."

      Which is all fine and dandy, if you find some situation of theft and cheating to pontificate about. But so far, the only thing close to an example of stealing is your wild, nothing-to-do-with-anything-being-discussed, example of someone shoplifting a package of cookies.

      Delete
  11. General comment--rollover data is a good idea and will help push other carriers to provide it on other plans. Many of us purchase a prepaid plan that provides just enough data for our average needs, thereby saving money. But, because we have "just enough" it is very easy to go over one month and that's what makes rollover data great and will save money in the long run. It allows you to purchase the cheapest possible plan for average usage.

    ReplyDelete
  12. l seen people use as much as 90gb a month on metro pcs unlimited data plan. If you live in a good metro area, nothing beats there unlimited plan. Not Cricket, not Boost, Sprint etc.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I bet that one guy would call you a thief and a cheat for using that 90gb of data in one month. Especially if... gasp... you dare to watch a movie on the last day of the plan month.

      Delete
    2. I don't think there's anything immoral about using 90 GB of hotspot data on an unlimited plan but I do believe that the more people who do that, the sooner unlimited data will disappear.

      Delete
    3. Yes, it comes down to "reasonable" vs "unreasonable" use. That is usually built into any carrier's TOS. People that abuse an "unlimited" plan may get away with it for some time, but if enough people do it there simply won't be "unlimited" offered anymore if it's costing the company money over profits.

      Delete
    4. "Yes, it comes down to "reasonable" vs "unreasonable" use"

      But you overlook the word "unlimited", under which using as much data as you want is "reasonable". If, say, they consider using more than 30GB unreasonable, they should advertise "30GB max" instead of "unlimited".

      You can't blame the customers whatsoever for using the product that is advertised.

      Delete
    5. "People that abuse an "unlimited"
      .... in other words. by the definition of "unlimited", merely using as much data as you want can't be "abuse"

      Delete
    6. Exactly and also why unlimited is unsustainable and will go away.

      Delete
    7. Right, "unlimited" is the term and it's come under fire (rightfully so). All "unlimited" plans usually have an * now stating they are not truly unlimited. I wish they couldn't even use that word but that's marketing!

      Delete
    8. Marketing needs to be honest. Unlimited has an unambiguous meaning. If something has limits it's by definition not unlimited and calling it unlimited is dishonest.

      Delete
  13. Metro pcs goes crazy with the ad's promoting unlimited data, you can't get mad when someone takes them up on their offer. If t-mobile has a problem with it, let them take the unlimited plan out.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Exactly... and a user using 100GB isn't engaging in "abuse".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nope, but the carrier is losing money on them and I'm sure you know where that leads.

      Delete
    2. The "abuse" is defined by the company though. They are free to deny service to anyone they wish. Owning a business 101.

      Delete
  15. But they aren't free to deny a service that they advertised, and that a customer paid for and is using within the confines of the advertised deal. Denying such is a form of fraud.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hence why throttling was invented. Giving someone unlimited of something they can barely use discourages unlimited use.

      Delete
  16. if something is advertised as unlimited, the only bounds are such factors as the advertised speed of the data. 90gb is but a fraction of the total that you would have if you were using your data at the advertised maximum speed for the entire month.

    And nothing short of this technical maximum monthly consumption limit can be considered to be "abuse" by any stretch, as it is data consumption definitely within the proudly advertised technical parameters.

    If the company advertises this but refuses to deliver, they are the ones who should get in trouble.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I live in an area where Verizon is king, followed by Sprint and then ok coverage with AT&T. I've had Cricket but left because their customer service is incompetent, but mainly because in my area the coverage is really spotty and doesn't extend far enough (coverage is ONLY within a part of the city) and I now have Boost Mobile. I had Boost and Virgin many times throughout the years and I just want to say that Sprint's network is GREATLY improved and I've been very happy. It isn't the fastest but I get great coverage, pretty good speeds, and a lot of data. I usually go way over my 10GB plan and it continues at high speed when it should be throttled. Not sure why but I'm not complaining. So those still thinking of Sprint as the same old network from your past, I'm here to tell you that has definitely changed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "I've had Cricket but left because their customer service is incompetent, but mainly because in my area the coverage is really spotty and doesn't extend far enough...."

      cricket fail

      Delete
Comment Page :