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You Can Now Download These Albums for Free or Only 99 Cents

google-play-music

If you're on the lookout for a great deal for your Android device, Google's Play Store has some offers you surely wouldn't want to miss. For starters, they are offering four albums that you can now download for free. These albums include Andra Day's Cheers to the Fall, Brett Eldredge's Illinois, Gary Clark Jr.'s The Story of Sonny Boy Slim, and Jana Kramer's Thirty One.

Apart from these free albums, the Google Play Store is offering another 8 albums that you can download for only $0.99. The albums on this discount include Slipknot's .5: The Gray Chapter, Wiz Khalifa's Blacc Hollywood, Chris Janson's Buy Me a Boat, Meek Mill's Dreams Worth More Than Money, Future's DS2, G-Eazy's These Things Happen, Chris Brown's X, and Skrillex and Diplo present Jack Ü.

The offer for these albums are only available in the United States and may not be available anywhere else. Once you've added these albums to your Google account, you can stream or download them anytime you like; even when their prices go back to normal. As of this writing, these are the albums available from the Play Store for free or for a discount. Who knows, maybe they have a few others lined up for those who want to add new tracks to their playlist.

Source: AndroidPolice

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9 comments:

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  1. When does the offer expire

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    1. Google isn't saying but past free and 99¢ album offers have only lasted a day or two.

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  2. People still pay for music?

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    1. They do. People who aren't OK with ripping off musicians.

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    2. Actually, so much of it is the musicians flat out refusing to take our money. Bootlegs, concerts, out-of-print music that could only be gotten used LP until someone made an MP3 of it. Or situations where stuff was available on iTunes only for a long time, and in a non-standard format that only played on one hardware brand.

      If they wanted our money, they'd let us pay for this. But they flat our refuse, and any claim of lost money becomes petulant hypocritical whining by them..

      Also, when Metallica/etc filed frivolous lawsuits to harass and censor the old Napster, it taught me that it was immoral to buy CDs and support such behavior. So I studiously avoided buying CDs from major labels for years, since the money goes censorship, harassment, frivolous lawsuits, massive taxes on blank CD-R's, and the Constitution-killing "DMCA".

      However, in the last month, Apple offered a viable streaming music service. Google has one to: 4 out of 5 times they actually have songs I am looking for. So guess what, for the first time in years I'm paying for music.

      Back to ripping off musicians, there is no way obtaining an unauthorized MP3 of Duke Ellington, Amy Winehouse, or Jim Croce rips off a musician.

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    3. @anonymous 12/29/9:18am
      It's all Metallica's fault.

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    4. Lars Ulrich wasn't the only one, but he was quite a destructive force for a while. The frivolous lawsuits and harassment/censorship he championed thankfully didn't have an effect on what he had hoped. Plot the 2000 case of "Metallica v Napster" on the chart of music media sales:

      http://img.ultimate-guitar.com/_img/news/industry_news/music-industry-2.jpg

      and you will see he was just re-arranging deck chairs on the Titanic.

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    5. It's not "ripping off the musicians" to copy and share the data on a CD you legally purchased.

      Likewise, the guys over at XDA aren't "ripping off the carriers" by rooting their phones and modifying/copying/sharing system files.

      To go even further beyond, "Intellectual Property" itself is nothing more than the terribly obscene notion that ideas can and SHOULD be owned by a government-empowered monopoly.

      In other words, it's taking everything we know to make economies worse, and then applying it to the economy of ideas for the sake of modern day robber barons.

      There's literally no ethical argument for why individuals shouldn't be able to tinker with their stuff for non-commercial purposes.

      Only when someone's actually making a direct profit off of someone else's ideas can they be said to be ripping that party off.

      The funny this is, by that definition it's actually the recording labels, not the file-sharers, who're screwing musicians over the most.

      GEE, I WONDER WHY THEY'D WANT TO BLAME FILE-SHARERS INSTEAD. IT'S ALMOST LIKE THEY'RE USING PROPAGANDA TO HIDE THEIR OWN MISMANAGEMENT OF TALENT. OH WAIT, THAT'S EXACTLY WHAT THEY'RE DOING HAHAHA.

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    6. Intellectual Property rights promote creativity, reasearch, and development by allowing people to enjoy the fruits of their labor.

      However, what is absurd, is cutting short patent rights sooner than copy rights. If somebody invents something useful, or a pharma company develops medicine, they deserve at least as much IP protection as some pop song.

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