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Sprint Talks About the New Changes in Virgin Mobile

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Sprint is currently restructuring the way they approach its prepaid brand, Virgin Mobile. As part of this restructuring, they have previously announced that they were discontinuing two sub-brands offered through Virgin-- namely PayLo and Broadband2Go. According to Sprint's VP of prepaid services, Angela Rittgers, the restructuring was a way for them to concentrate on the "more engaged, higher-ARPU subscribers" brought about by their monthly unlimited plans.

Discontinue PayLo and Broadband2Go

Under Virgin, PayLo offered customers with unlimited talking and texting through low-end devices. Broadband2Go, on the other hand, provided prepaid data services using portable USB sticks and Wi-Fi hotspots. According to the company, the main reason why they have decided to discontinue PayLo is because it didn't "fit in the Virgin distribution strategy" as this only appealed to customers looking for an extra "burner phone." As for Broadband2Go, Sprint executives no longer see the point of offering the plan as tablets and other smart devices already come with a built-in cellular connection.

Updated Pricing Plan

Along with this announcement, the carrier has updated its pricing options for customers to choose from. These new pricing options will be announced within the day include the following options:

  • $30 per month plan - comes with unlimited talk, text and data with 500 MB of high-speed data
  • $40 per month plan - comes with unlimited talk, text and data with 4 GB of data
  • $50 per month plan - comes with unlimited talk, text and data with 6 GB of data

The good news is that these newly updated plans now include zero-rated streaming music from services such as Pandora, iHeartRadio, 8track, Slacker, and Samsung Milk. In the future, Sprint still plans to add more music streaming services; using customer feedback as a basis for bringing in more of these services. And since these are included in Sprint's data plans, the data generated from these services will not be counted against the monthly data allotment of the customer. Once users surpass the monthly data allotment by using other services not mentioned, the speed automatically slows down to 2G connection.

Updates on Virgin Mobile Custom

Another announcement made is that Virgin will no longer be offering the Virgin Mobile Custom in Walmart, which was launched about two years ago. Back then, it was launched using ItsOn, a cloud-based billing and service platform. But after two years, executives noted that the offer was too complicated for users they usually targeted from Walmart. Despite this, Virgin will still be offering the ItsOn-powered Data Sharing service in Walmart. 

With these changes, Sprint reiterates that it is very much committed to the prepaid industry as they continue to provide support for its prepaid brands: Assurance, Boost, Sprint Prepaid, and Virgin Mobile. These changes are the result of the company's attempt at de-emphasizing its Virgin brand in lieu of a new strategy.

Find out more about these changes on Virgin Mobile.


Source: Fierce Wireless

34 comments:

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  1. Sprint just has too many prepaid brand. It hurts more then help them. They should put all their effort in one prepaid brand.

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  2. WHAT ARE THEY DOING? they just change $55 - 8GB to $60 - 8GB?? I don't understand what Sprint doing.

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  3. Sprint's biggest problems are limited coverage and the almost complete lack of BYOP options.

    Having lots of brands is an old marketing trick to gain retial shelf space and give customers the allusion of choice. Too many prepaid brands doesn't seem to hurting T-Mobile which has three or TracFone with six.

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    1. Their biggest problem is their massive debt load of $33 BILLION on the balance sheet!

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    2. Sprint not fooling anybody with those choice. Customer are smart now adays not like 5 years ago. They know those are all sprint brand. Assurance, Boost, Sprint Prepaid, and Virgin Mobile

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    3. Dennis said: "Sprint's biggest problems are limited coverage and the almost complete lack of BYOP options. "

      Exactly. And to thrive to make up for this deficiency, they have to have significantly better than the competitors. Not these new options, which offer (for one comparison) a little more data than Cricket, with much worse coverage.

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  4. At the very least, they should include roaming with these plans. Seriously, how can Sprint management be so completely clueless about customer choice. They don't have BYOD, group plans, or auto pay discounts. Their native phone selection is a joke too.

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    1. 100 minutes of off-network roaming is included.

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    2. Well, since they hired Marcelo Claure as CEO, it went from very bad to "they are on life support" now, he just has no clue how to run a wireless Co. personally I don't think Sprint has long to live as an independent Co.

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    3. There's no off network roaming with the Virgin Mobile Unlimited plans that this post is about.

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    4. "Virgin will still be offering the ItsOn-powered Data Sharing service in Walmart."
      100 minutes of off-network roaming is included.

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    5. True, but Sprint runs the Data Sharing (aka Data Done Right) service as if it was a separate brand from the rest of Virgin. You can't even use Data Sharing phones on the regular Virgin plans or vice versa.

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  5. Should I move to Boost Mobile? I used Cricket for 5 years since from Cricket. The Sprint enhanced network just added my home area, I saw their speed hit 75Mbps. Should I give up Cricket's 20GB plan and switch to Boost's unlimited data plan?

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    1. Rural coverage vs. data speed. Take your pick.

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    2. It's not just rural coverage. It's coverage, period. AT&T (which Cricket is on) and Verizon have good coverage in most places. Sprint and T-Mobile (the latter less so) not only poorly cover rural areas, but a significant proportion of the cities and towns in the US.

      So if you move from Cricket to Boost, you will save a little money, but your phone will likely not work in a lot of places around you, including if you need to go elsewhere in your state.

      You also need to identify the mobile data uses which you can do on a supposed max 75mbps that you can't do on Cricket's 5mbps. If there is nothing, then it is more a matter of "decent coverage vs saving on your plan"

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    3. No, it's just rural coverage. Sprint and T-Mobile do an excellent job covering urban markets, major highways and most cities. Rural towns in rural areas might not have coverage.
      For details, people can check the maps for themselves.

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    4. No, it's not just rural coverage. Sprint and T-Mobile do an excellent job of covering most very large cities, but most cities period are poorly served by it.

      Yes, check the maps, you will see that the two bad carriers cover a small part the country, and only a minority of the cities.

      Rural means: "in, relating to, or characteristic of the countryside rather than the town". So if it is a town, including the vast majority of zip codes ignored by these two non-national networks, it's not rural.

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    5. And yes, if you pluck let's say 10 cities at random from any gazetteer, you will likely find that one or two (if any) have Sprint or T-Mobile coverage. A carrier that does an "excellent job" at covering just a few places is doing a poor job of being a mobile carrier.

      You pay less, you get a bad carrier. You pay more, you get a good one. There's still a huge difference, especially for those who want to go anywhere, not make sure to travel on the few covered highways or stay within sight of the small proportion of US cities covered by these networks.

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    6. There are 497 urban areas in the US (population over 50,000), according to the 2010 Census. The 20 smallest urban areas, from Pascagoula, MS to Farmington, NM all have T-Mobile coverage. This leaves about 3,500 more cities (population between 10,000 and 50,000). Check the Census and see those. Looking at the 20 smallest Census “metro areas” of at least 10,000 people, from Heber, UT to Fairfield IA, only one, Fitzgerald, GA did not have solid coverage (it was spotty).
      That leaves about 31,000 towns and villages, with population below 10,000.
      It sounds like a lot, but many are in suburbs or exurbs of larger metro areas. Since T-Mobile now covers more than 304M people with LTE out of 330M people in the USA (92%+) and added 1 Million square miles of LTE coverage last year, I expect that almost all cities will have T-Mobile coverage, and a large percentage of towns (below 10,000 people) will as well.
      It's not the T-Mobile your father knew, so it's time to update the tired, old talking points.

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    7. The covering "330M people" statistic is worthless for a mobile carrier, as it is based on static points. The talking points remain valid until T-Mobile starts to become as good as the carriers that are still much better,instead of trying to mislead like in the "your father" days.... and still today.

      The good networks just cover. The bad ones cover provide half the coverage and mislead about it.

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  6. Cricket is not just slower, they also get lower priority to other AT&T customers. I literally have two identical phone (same model), one is work phone and one is personal phone on Cricket. The Cricket phone was getting crazy slow data at a ball game and native-AT&T was much faster. Cricket was basically not usable and the native-AT&T was usable - that's the difference when it comes to that.

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    1. That's because Cricket is throttled as a matter of policy. It's not more than 5-8mbps on AT&T's 4G networks. That's how the company's plans works. It's just like T-Mobile's Simply Prepaid and Verizon MVNOs. It's natively throttled. So if the network is congested on top of it your speeds are going to be abysmal. That's why I refuse to pay for such services. These brands should not be allowed to operate without this being made very well known. It's a shame that the FTC or who doesn't get on their case for not making it abundantly clear that the service is throttled.

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    2. check out toms guides for best and worst net prepaid networks for more on this just updated

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    3. OpenSignal reported that average mobile data speed on Cricket was only 3.5 Mpbs. Much slower than all other networks tested.
      AT&T average speed was more than double that of Cricket in the same report.

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    4. I get Cricket twice as fast as the data I used to get on Virgin.

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    5. "OpenSignal reported that average mobile data speed on Cricket was only 3.5 Mpbs. Much slower than all other networks tested."

      Open Signal does a poor job of properly averaging in places with no signal at all. If you did an honest accounting of average speed. T-Mobile and Sprint network solutions would probably be slower than Cricket, as you'd be including the areas of 0 mbps of Sprint and T-Mobile along with those areas of 20 mbps.

      Of course a carrier comes out much faster if you cook your results to exclude areas where it doesn't work at all.

      Now, Open Signal does have some value. The statistic comparing Cricket to normal AT&T actually is valid, since they have the same coverage, and you won't have the problem of cooked figures excluding areas of no coverage from calculations.

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    6. "Open Signal does a poor job of properly averaging in places with no signal at all."
      This is true, but it's not an intelligent argument. It's condescending because it assumes people are too dumb to pick coverage that works for them. OpenSignal measures actual speeds that users get on their networks, and averages them. It's far more realistic and useful to prospective customers than averaging in zero speeds in unknown places where prospective subscribers won't need data coverage. So your hypothesis is wrong anyway.

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    7. It's a very intelligent argument, as it points out that OpenSignal is poor and very biased at measuring signal strength/speed between different carriers.

      "It's condescending because it assumes people are too dumb to pick coverage that works for them. "

      Not at all. I strive for accuracy.

      "OpenSignal measures actual speeds that users get on their networks, and averages them."

      Which is actually a worthless number, since people avoid using their phones in the areas with no or bad coverage.

      ". It's far more realistic and useful to prospective customers than averaging in zero speeds in unknown places where prospective subscribers won't need data coverage"

      You are arrogant to assume that no-one will ever need coverage in an area that the carrier is deficient in. You are making a wild-eyed assumption to justify very misleading numbers. The only valid measurements of average speed for networks in an area take into account all spots in the area. Only then do you get an accurate and useful picture.

      Interesting the lengths people go to justify misleading statistics. You could use your same sort of logic to say that Stockton, CA is the safest city in the US if you leave out the areas in it where there's crime. Because no one ever goes there and they don't matter, right?

      And if you really think that people don't want to use their phones in places where lack of towers bars it, you are probably amazed that any network has expanded at all since putting in their first tower decades ago.

      So, all we need to do is be accurate.



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    8. No, the vast majority of people do not need to waste money buying extra coverage every month that they don't need, just because they might go somewhere, some day that is outside their coverage area.
      Tens of millions of people are satisfied with Sprint and T-Mobile coverage and enjoy better value with plans they chose.
      Dennis still gives the best advice:
      Check coverage maps for the places where you live, work and play, and then pick the carrier and plan that best fits your usage.

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  7. The 40 plan with 4gb and unlimited streaming isn't that bad.

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  8. All of sub carriers all have there positive's and negative's....Cricket Wireless is throttled...Simply Prepaid Brand is throttled...there are many more but in the end which one of them fit your needs...l need to be make calls when l need to and sprint,tmobile coverage is very spotty driving from FL to NJ...l love at&t coverage but hate there pricing so l use cricket and l have not yet had any issues...if you live in a good native sprint coverage area this plan is great!!!! Dont get me wrong l have metropcs,boost mobile and cricket....plus there parent companies and l like cricket over them all!!!..Bring Back the 20GB plan...hint hint

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  9. With the demise of Broadband2go, what can we do with the Virgin Broadband2go USB device (Novatel Ovation MC760)? Is there another MVNO where we can use this hardware?

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    1. You can sell anything on eBay if the price is right. Use a 99c 30-day auction.

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    2. As far as I know none of the MVNOs can activate. Broadband2Go devices.

      But I don't think you have much to worry about. Sprint's usually pretty good about grandfathering. You can probably keep using your stick modem indefinitely as long as you buy a month or day of service at least once every 365 days.

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