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Cricket Expands US Distribution, Now Available through Best Buy and Aaron's

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Not too long ago, Cricket promised that it would expand its retail distribution to better accommodate its customers. Today, the prepaid cellular service provider did good on its promise by announcing that their phones and services are now available in 1,300 Best Buy locations and about 2,000 Aaron's lease-to-own locations. Based on their announcement, Cricket will be selling a selection of its devices on Best Buy's website and stores for the next two weeks. After that, they will continue adding more devices to their lineup over the next two months.

By making their devices and services available through Best Buy and Aaron's, Cricket is partnering with two of the most powerful handset retailers in the country. Through Aaron's, customers can easily purchase a phone from the retailer or bring their own phone and have a BYOD Cricket SIM card kit activated in no time. Apart from Cricket, Best Buy sells devices from other prepaid service providers like Virgin Mobile, Boost Mobile and TracFone. Meanwhile, Aaron's sells and leases unlocked GSM devices capable for activation under AT&T, MetroPCS, T-Mobile, TracFone, and many others.

With their announcement, Cricket's distribution now expands to over 11,000 retail outlets throughout the country. This decision is part of the company's move to have "a very aggressive distribution strategy" through its own stores and third parties. Other online vendors where Cricket phones may be purchased include Target, Amazon, and many others.

This aggressive promotion of Cricket's products has led them to add 466,000 net prepaid subscribers in just the third quarter of last year and another 469,000 in the fourth quarter. Partly responsible for this is the $63 million AT&T spent to promote its prepaid sector in the last quarter of the year.

Some of the phones that you may find on Cricket include a variety of devices starting from the $10 LG Risio to the more expensive iPhone 6s Plus at $850. Their plans start at $35 per month with a $5 "Auto-Pay" credit, which also includes all taxes and fees. The most expensive plan is at $60 per month, which includes unlimited voice and text, and 10GB of high-speed data. 


Source: Fierce Wireless

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21 comments:

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  1. Calling it "high-speed" data gives the impression its more that what it real is. Its really a reduced or slowed speed LTE data. But if 8 Mbps max LTE speed is considered high-speed then I guess it's high speed data.

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  2. Go Cricket... Bit the Sprint!

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  3. I would be willing to bet the average prepaid consumer does not know Cricket uses the ATT network. They should have the ATT "world" logo somewhere on their packaging.

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    1. Why would they do that, it's like putting a Lexus badge on a Toyota Corolla. Same parent company, different clientele.

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    2. That is correct, I work for cricket and its the job of the sales advocates to bring awareness to the consumers...thats why most stores you see have the doors open and advocates outside. There is A LOT room for growth with cricket wireless.

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  4. "Calling it "high-speed" data gives the impression its more that what it real is"

    Unless you can give some example of what 8mbps is too slow to do, it's high speed. The Cricket speed is enough to stream Netflix and HBO and Youtube (and of course audio). What isn't it "high speed" enough to do in today's environment?

    Besides, if you look at averages, especially compared to Sprint and T-Mobile (which have isolate spots of over 10mbps in seas of 0 mbps), Cricket comes out faster.

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    1. Calling it high-speed gives the average consumer the impression that the speeds they will be getting is the highest speeds that AT&T can supply via LTE. And that simply is not accurate. The data speeds are in fact slowed down considerably. I see this as something very much akin to advertising unlimited data and then throttling it after x amount of usage.

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    2. Cricket had by far the worst network performance and the worst overall scores of the 9 carriers tested by Tom's Guide for "The Best and Worst Phone Carriers." If fact, Cricket performance was so bad that they do not recommend Cricket at all.
      T-Mobile outscored Cricket in every category, and scored 84% more performance points than Cricket.
      What does this mean to you? You're wasting your time, settling for the worst network performance when you use Cricket.
      http://www.tomsguide.com/us/best-phone-carriers,review-3066.html

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    3. Cricket's network performance is better than anything on Sprint or T-Mobile. Cricket provides 5 mbps in so many places with 0 bars of Sprint or T-Mobile. Average that out: some service is much better than none. Tom's Guide fails in that it ignores the most important part: the service. Their speed results are cooked and ignore the huge areas with no coverage (no speed).

      Unless you cook the results, anything AT&T based will be on average anything T-Mobile based.
      You are wasting your time settling with T-Mobile... not a true national network, with service only slightly better with Sprint.

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    4. "Cricket's network performance is better than anything on Sprint or T-Mobile. "
      The only thing less correct than this would be the claim of the inverse. It always depends on location. When we tried Cricket, the data was so slow we needed to wait literally hours for a MMS to send, even though it was an LTE signal. And of course, I've been in places where T-Mobile is bogged and AT&T was blazing.

      Since you gave your personal opinions, I'll proffer mine. Both AT&T and Verizon at this stage are overpriced, over advertized, over hyped and under performing in value. T-Mobile performs as well or better for a lot of users. And with Music Freedom and Binge On provide exceptional value.

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  5. Bad idea to use ATT in the branding of Cricket as ATT directly is a superior user experience. Notice how on Metro they use t-mobile branding but there really is not much difference in speed between the two. just slightly lower network priority during congestion periods.

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    1. At&t has had the worst customer experience for years, where as Verizon has been tops.

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    2. AT&T's network is better than anything other than Verizon. If it is the pits, then the other two are worse than the pits.

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    3. T-Mobile is still clinging to that 2013 coverage map. Their claims of expansion are mostly smoke and mirrors. And looked at their rigged ball test.

      T-Mobile is still a significantly inferior networks compared to the two true national ones. If you want the poor experience of Sprint with the excitement of a swearing CEO, added, then T-Mobile is for you.

      If you aren't on a budget and can afford the best customer experience, you will stick to real carriers not uncarriers.

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  6. Cricket service is disappointing. I miss so many calls and it can take 5-10s for a call to go through. Data (and ping) is just so slow and basically unusable on HSPA. LTE is prioritized so hard that the moment there is even a slight bit of congestion your service is useless. The CS agent they've hired are ignorant buffoons. They're coverage isn't even that great compared to how much T-Mobile has expanded.

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    1. T-Mobile coverage is a little better than Sprint, but still much much worse than AT&T coverage. Still a huge difference. Verizon at this time is the only other true national network on a par with AT&T.

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    2. From the latest Open Signal network comparison report: "T-Mobile Defies the Coverage Critics
      T-Mobile traditionally has fallen short of its larger rivals Verizon and AT&T in coverage, but it's a problem CEO John Legere has vowed to fix. Our most recent data shows he's making good on that promise. T-Mobile's LTE coverage increased to 81% in the fourth quarter. It now nearly matches AT&T in LTE availability and is closing the gap with Verizon."
      http://opensignal.com/reports/2016/02/usa/state-of-the-mobile-network/

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  7. Cricket and AT&T coverage is definitely NOT the same. I have AT&T post paid, my wife has a Cricket service (we both use an IPhone 6+), there are places were I get full 5 bars, and she gets barley 1,(never the opposite) which means Cricket has access to LESS towers than the parent Co.

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    1. The difference is that AT&T postpaid has roaming, Cricket doesn't.

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  8. Is there a $25 activation charge for Cricket if you buy/activate the phone at Best Buy?

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  9. I just noticed on the Best Buy site that when you click on No Contract Phones Cricket has Bumped Sprint Pre-Paid from the main list of "Carriers"
    You can still find SPP if you go to the left to All No Contract Phones and click on Sprint, but that is a huge slap in the face to SPP.

    Maybe the impending doom of SPP?

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