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T-Mobile Adds More Video Streaming Services to Binge On Program

t-mobile-binge-on
Without a doubt, T-Mobile's Binge On program has been quite a success. The service has undeniably changed the way its customers enjoy watching videos on their mobile phones. Just recently, T-Mobile released numbers depicting the positive response of its customers to their Binge On program and just how much this has changed video streaming on smartphones.

According to their study:
  • Since Binge On was launched, over 377 million hours of video have been streamed by T-Mobile customers without using their high-speed data
  • 92% of T-Mobile customers said they will continue to watch more videos through Binge On. 93% said they like having their videos optimized to DVD quality so they can continue watching without worrying about running out of high-speed data allottment
  • 89% of US wireless customers agree that Binge On would be an interesting feature for their wireless service
  • 94% of US wireless customers are willing to try a new online service as long as it was part of a free data offer like Binge On
Based on the figures, T-Mobile CEO John Legere shares that they consider Binge On as a success and that it is a service loved by their customers. In just six months ever since the service was launched, the number of video providers streaming free content has grown by over 240%.

And true enough, this morning T-Mobile announced that they will be adding new channels to Binge On. The new video streaming services added today include the following:

  • Google Play Music (Music Freedom)
  • Great Big Story
  • Kiswe
  • Ligonier Ministries
  • NBC
  • NOGGIN
  • Qello Concerts
  • Radio Disney (Music Freedom)
  • Spotify (Music Freedom)
  • TIDAL (Music Freedom)
  • Toon Goggles
  • Univision
  • Univision Noticias
The services under Music Freedom have also brought in their video libraries to Binge On so that T-Mobile customers may be able to stream video and music without running out of high-speed data. With these new streaming services, Binge On now has over 80 video providers that customers can enjoy streaming from.

Binge On is a free service available on T-Mobile's $65, $80 and $95 Simple Choice prepaid plans. To find out the other video streaming services available under the program, visit T-Mobile's website.


Source: T-Mobile




75 comments:

Comment Page :
  1. And it follows that T-Mobile punishes customers for viewing video from the hundreds if not thousands of sources not on that tiny list.

    It's not right, and it is of obviously dubious legality, for T-Mobile to take such an interest in how you use your data, to the point of penalizing customers for getting it from non-approved sources. It also sets a very bad precedent, and stifles innovation in providing video content.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I used data and they counted it against my data limit! They're PUNISHING ME!!

      ILLEGAL! ILLEGAL!

      Delete
    2. What is of "dubious legality" is that the data isn't counted if it comes from companies Legere likes, and it is counted if it comes from companies he does like.

      Delete
    3. You mean like old school free mobile-to-mobile?

      Or more like companies who give an AAA discount?

      Delete
    4. Sounds like you're mad that you're paying $15/GB in overages. Keep paying Verizon while the rest of use enjoy unlimited video. We need competition and if we start over-regulating programs we no longer have competition. Nothing illegal about BingeOn which was praised by the FCC and Google even got on board.

      Delete
    5. "I used data and they counted it against my data limit! They're PUNISHING ME!!

      ILLEGAL! ILLEGAL!"

      That's a false description. What T-Mobile is doing is counting data from companies they do not like (for the sole reason of a meaningless disagreement) against your total. But yes, it is indeed illegal. At least twice over.

      If you like the idea of a future when cell carriers or ISP's willy-nilly censor content from any provider they dislike, then T-Mobile is for you. If you want to enjoy the T-Mobile model in everything, go to Mainland China.

      Delete
    6. You got it completely backwards. If you want the government to censor and control everything, China is your natural home.
      If you want Internet freedom and innovation, the goals that Congress expressed in an amendment to the same 1934 law that FCC unilaterally claims gives them the right to regulate the internet?
      Stay here in the USA and Binge On!

      Delete
    7. T-Mobile's illegal censorship scam is a lot more "Red China" than treating ALL data the same. Legere's dubious scheme stifles innovation.

      Binge OFF means a free market: content providers and customers decide what is good or not, as opposed to a hotheaded profane CEO censoring providers he disagrees with. Legere's bad and illegal idea gets rid of Internet freedom.

      Delete
    8. If by "illegal censorship scam" you mean parental controls and net nanny type features, that remains to be seen. However, that censorship is common in the smartphone industry, as well as for WiFi in shops, and a pro free speech ruling would have widespread impact.

      When it comes to Binge On, the truth is simple, as inconvenient as that is to the FUD-ees. T-Mobile does not use Binge On to censor or block any video content. They simply charge full price.

      Delete
    9. Binge-On is the illegal censorship scam.

      Nice semantic trick when you falsely claim "T-Mobile does not use Binge On to censor or block any video content."

      They charge extra for you to view content they do not approve of. That's a form of censorship, even if it isn't outright complete banning.

      Delete
    10. whinge on


      The truth is T-Mobile does not use Binge On to censor or block any video content. They don't charge extra.

      They simply count 10MB as 10MB for your porn, same as AT&T and Verizon.

      Delete
    11. 1) You seem to be porn-obsessed.
      2) Punishing users with a data-use penalty for viewing content that T-Mobile doesn't want you to see is a form of censorship.
      -----------

      For T-Mobile to comply with the law, they need to include all data use under Binge-On. That would be legal and great for consumers, and great for content developers.

      Delete
  2. T-mobile is still excluding video traffic from a wide variety of legitimate websites, thereby devaluing the service and its hefty price tag.

    It'd be a lot more tempting if T-mo stopped playing gatekeeper and just zero-rated all media traffic regardless of which site it came from.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Different rules are illegal. They either have to zero rate all data or stop giving streaming videos preferential treatment. They also need to have the same zero rate rules for paygo and monthly plans.

      Delete
    2. Sure! #CellServiceEquality #FreeData4All

      Delete
  3. What's all this griping about? It's a free country. Don't like binge-on? Move on!
    Go elsewhere! Stop complaining! Nobody is forcing you to sign up!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're completely missing the point. Re-read what the above posts are saying. This is not about "griping."

      Delete
    2. You're right. Just sour grapes whining above. Just let them rant; their streaming p*rn is not included, or they can't binge on because they won't pay for simple choice.

      Delete
  4. Don't like it? Then you're free to go with one of the other 3 providers and see how fast you run of data. This is an impressive list. Until another carrier starts offering a similar service, quit complaining about not getting free data. If it was illegal, then it would have been shut down by complaints from the other 3.
    120 Sports
    A&E
    Amazon Video
    Baeble Music
    Crackle
    Crunchyroll
    CuriosityStream
    Dailymotion
    DirecTV
    Discovery GO
    Encore
    EPIX
    ESNE
    ESPN
    Fandor
    FilmOn TV
    Fox Business
    Fox News
    Fox Sports
    Fox Sports GO
    fubo TV
    FYI
    Go90
    Google Play Movies
    Google Play Music
    GREAT BIG STORY
    HBO GO
    HBO NOW
    History
    Hulu
    Kidoodle.TV
    Kiswe
    KlowdTV
    Ligonier Ministries
    Lifetime
    Lifetime Movie Club
    Major League Baseball
    Movieplex
    NBC
    NBC Sports
    Netflix
    Newsy
    Nick
    NOGGIN
    ODK Media
    OVGuide
    OWNZONES
    Playstation Vue
    Qello Concerts
    Qkids
    Radio Disney
    Red Bull TV
    Showtime
    Showtime Anytime
    Sling Box
    Sling TV
    Spike
    Spotify
    Starz
    Tennis Channel EverywhereTIDAL
    T-Mobile TV
    Toon Goggles
    TV Land
    Univision
    Univision Deportes
    Univision Noticias
    Univision NOW
    Ustream
    Vessel
    Vevo
    Viki
    VUDU
    WWE Network
    YipTV
    YouTube
    YouTube Kids
    YouTube Red
    YouTube Music

    ReplyDelete
  5. Never seen so many complaints about free stuff. Why don't you all complain some more? Maybe you can get this injustice taken care of and Tmobile will be forced the charge data to all video. Then you will complain that Tmobile is greedy and removing a "perk" just to line it's pockets.

    ReplyDelete
  6. People, please have positive mind. Binge ON better than Verizon att and Sprint.

    ReplyDelete
  7. 1) The so-called "impressive list" is just a tiny bit of all the video providers out there. And it is illegal for T-Mobile to censor video from companies it doesn't like and promote video from companies it does like.

    2) "Sounds like you're mad that you're paying $15/GB"

    Any T-Mobile customer will pay these overages if they dare to engage in the immoral activity of watching non-Legere approved video.

    3) "Keep paying Verizon while the rest of use enjoy unlimited video."

    You don't get it. T-Mobile limits video it doesn't like. As for paying Verizon, you get what you pay for. T-Mobile coverage is so bad that if I downgraded to it, all video would be equal under T-Mobile's threadbare "zero bars of service in most places" network. But Binge-On is dangerous for Verizon and its customers: if T-Mobile gets away with illegally censoring data based on its content, then Verizon and the others will too. A very bad development.

    4) "We need competition and if we start over-regulating programs we no longer have competition."

    Illegal throtting schemes are all about censorship, and ultimately destroying the Internet, and have nothing to do with "competition". If you look forward to a future in which you pay your ISP varying amounts based on which web site you wish to look at, then Binge-On is for you.

    5) "Nothing illegal about BingeOn which was praised by the FCC and Google even got on board."

    It is quite illegal. Look at the existing law.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Binge On breaks no law. Net Neutrality is not a law, and Binge On does not violate that either. The FCC should know; they wrote it. Finally, if a T-Mobile customer doesn't like it or thinks it's immoral, they just turn it off.

      Delete
    2. And now to counter misinformation with facts.

      (1) "Binge On breaks no law."

      It does, actually.

      (2) "Net Neutrality is not a law"

      It is. It passed on Feb 27, 2015.

      (3) "and Binge On does not violate that either"

      See No. 1

      (4) "Finally, if a T-Mobile customer doesn't like it or thinks it's immoral, they just turn it off."

      The attitude that if one does not like criminal behavior, is, in my opinion, loathesome. And this opinion is the only opinion presented here. The rest is well known fact.



      Delete
    3. "(1) "Binge On breaks no law."
      It does, actually.
      (2) "Net Neutrality is not a law"
      It is. It passed on Feb 27, 2015."

      This is fiction. The FCC cannot pass laws. Only Congress can do that.
      On Feb 26, FCC decided unilaterally to classify the Internet as a telecommunications service. That does not make net neutrality principles law.
      The FCC just seized power to regulate the Internet. Many people think they had no power to do that, but since the Prez supported it and the FCC is controlled by a Dem, Congess decided not to undo it. We'll see what happens after the election.

      Delete
    4. Pretty much everything the FCC does is de facto unconstitutional. The US government has no constitutional authority to regulate the internet, to censor radio or television, etc.

      It should be clear to anybody paying attention. The FCC violates the First Amendment on a regular basis. Legally, according to the highest Law of the Land, it is the FCC who are criminals, not those who excercise their basic human rights.

      Delete
  8. "Never seen so many complaints about free stuff."

    The complaint is about an illegal throtting/censorship scheme, and not "free stuff".

    "Why don't you all complain some more? Maybe you can get this injustice taken care of and Tmobile will be forced the charge data to all video."

    That would be great, if T-Mobile were forced to obey the law and put ALL data in Binge-On.

    "Then you will complain that Tmobile is greedy and removing a "perk" just to line it's pockets."

    T-Mobile charging extra for content from companies it likes is not a perk.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Binge On is not illegal. If you think it is, tell us what law and which provision.

      Delete
    2. Ever heard of a free market? We used to have one. Government got out of the way, and allowed company A to do something that customers didn't like. Company B and C did the opposite and customers left company A to go to company B and C. Company A went out of business. Problem solved. Stop relying on the government to fix all your problems with laws and regulations.

      Delete
    3. "tell us what law and which provision"
      #AllYouHearIsCrickets

      Delete
  9. "People, please have positive mind. Binge ON better than Verizon att and Sprint"

    Binge-On is much worse. The three companies you name do not illegally make you pay extra for content from non-approved video providers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Double wrong. Bing On is not illegal, and Verizon does the same as T-Mobile now.

      Delete
  10. "Different rules are illegal. They either have to zero rate all data or stop giving streaming videos preferential treatment. They also need to have the same zero rate rules for paygo and monthly plans."

    Exactly. You clearly understand the law, and why T-Mobile's customer-hostile content-based scam is a bad idea.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Neither of you understand the law. You meant to say 'regulation.' And the FCC, who wrote the reg, don't have a problem with Binge On.

      Delete
  11. BingeOn = ALL YOUR VIDEOS ARE BELONG TO ME (T-Mobile).

    BUT, T-Mobile gets to choose which ones they count and which ones they don't, even though they throttle ALL VIDEOS - NOT JUST STREAMING BUT DOWNLOADING VIDEO FILES AS WELL.

    Downloading a 50MB video file would be slower than downloading a 50MB non-video file. Strange? Well, they already opted us in in this strangeness.

    There you have it. I don't like it, so I turned it off. #BOF# on your dialer (#BON# if you want it).

    PS: I'm not b*tching. I'm just sharing what's real. People should stop telling others to go to leave T-Mo etc., when all we're doing is a having a discussion.


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree. T-Mo subscribers who want free video that is lower resolution suitable for a mobile device's screen should just turn off Binge On.

      Delete
  12. Switch to Cricket Wireless...You can Binge all you want for $65 a month with
    autopay...and get a $100 switcher credit :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great idea. That way you won't feel like a criminal. And you'll have plenty of extra time to think about it because Cricket will heavily throttle ALL your mobile data use, and you can't turn that off.

      Delete
  13. The solution is not for consumers to dig through and find obscure settings to turn off the illegal "Binge On" throttling scheme. The solution is for T-Mobile to count all data usage under "Binge On". Because that is the law now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Binge On has never been illegal - and no law or regulation says T-Mobile has to charge you for all mobile data usage.

      Delete
  14. "Switch to Cricket Wireless...You can Binge all you want for $65 a month with
    autopay...and get a $100 switcher credit :-) "

    Excellent point. Not only that, you can binge just about anywhere you want on a much better network than T-Mobile (because all the supposed Binge-On "benefits" are worthless when T-Mobile can't be bothered to cover the country very well).

    And Cricket's data plans, unlike those of T-Mobile, are quite legal and consumer-friendly. Cricket (and AT&T) leave the decisions about which video or data usage is "wrong" or not entirely to the customer.

    Cricket data? Your choice. T-Mobile data? John's way or the highway.

    "Binge On" is nothing more than some sort of scam by T-Mobile to control what you watch (and they sell that is a GOOD thing) and to try and cover up that they still have a bad network. I wish they'd spend the money on covering the country like the real networks do, instead of dubious schemes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Most prepaid subscribers are not choosing AT&T brands over T-Mobile brands. Last quarter 61% more new phone customers chose T-Mobile. Better overall value there.
      I think the argument that no "free" mobile video is better than lots of "free" mobile video is just ridiculous. And of course, T-Mobile does not control or restrict what you can watch. There is no truth to that.

      Delete
  15. "Most prepaid subscribers are not choosing AT&T brands over T-Mobile brands."

    Way to cook the information to provide a deceptive picture. This particular post is about postpaid. And if we step back and look at the entire picture of what customers have chosen, all the way into 2016 Q1, more than twice as many customers decide that AT&T's offerings provided better value than those of T-Mobile.

    If you add in the other true national network (Verizon), four times as many people choose Verizon or AT&T as choose T-Mobile.

    No, the only ridiculous argument is yours. But you seem to want to deceive. The facts? T-Mobile is charging extra for the vast majority of video service providers out there, while it is charging nothing for a tiny handful that it likes. That's the facts, aside from the obvious illegality of it.

    "And of course, T-Mobile does not control or restrict what you can watch. There is no truth to that."

    The opposite is true. With the Binge-On scam punishing video viewers with data charges if they choose any but the few approved ones, they are in fact restricting what its customers do with their data.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Most postpaid subscribers are not choosing AT&T brands over T-Mobile brands either. Last quarter 675% more new phone customers chose T-Mobile. 1M new Tmo postpaid customers, versus only 129K for AT&T. Better overall value there too.
      Providing some data free does not punish any customers. If they feel that way, they can just turn off Binge On and have all mobile data count against their high speed allotment. Of course, Binge On customers don't feel like they are being punished. They love it, to the tune of 377 Million hours of video that they watched without affecting their data allotments. Binge On!

      Delete
  16. A lot of comments seem to miss two very important things.

    First, Net Neutrality is a set of standards that exist separate from the judgment of the FCC.

    The FCC doesn't actually decide whether or not something violates (the spirit of) Net Neutrality.

    That's something anyone can discern based on the simple standard of whether or not an internet provider treats certain kinds of traffic differently from the rest.

    In this case, Binge On is a huge red flag that's been doused with gasoline, lit on fire and waived in front of the FCC for all to see.

    The problem isn't that people are pointing out the obvious, but rather that the FCC is simply refusing to enforce the regulations and, get this, actually do the job it gets paid with taxpayer money to do.

    The second thing is that the way Binge On works is so anti-competitive, that all you'd need to do is apply it to anything else to see how screwed up it is.

    Imagine if your cable provider (which you might not have a choice in thanks to the establishment of mini fiefdoms) allowed you to watch Nick Jr as much as you'd like, while limiting your viewing of (insert whatever channel you actually like) to only a few hours each month.

    Or maybe you'd rather go to a baseball game where the MLB said that certain teams who "played ball" could have unlimited strikes, while teams who didn't were limited to only a few.

    What about if the NFL said some teams could only run a few yards, while others were free to move as they like?

    And let's not forget how great it would be if you could only visit whatever institutions the state disapproved of, even if they were libraries or churches, a couple times a month, while those who frequented preferred establishments could do so however many times they wished.

    Sure, the parties who'd benefit would be thrilled by a rigged set of rules.

    But you still wouldn't have anything resembling freedom, fairness or competition on a level playing field.

    The fact is, Binge On is basically the Cellfather stacking the deck in favor of streaming services who come to him on the day of his daughter's wedding, so long as the favor will be repaid.

    Nobody but a complete shill would see that as a good thing for mobile markets, because if it catches on with other carriers then you really would have the fabled universal fast lanes that NN doomsayers always said were coming.

    It's just that some slow lanes may end in a brick wall instead of a 2G-tier throttle.

    But of course, even the fast lanes would be restricted to higher cost plans, with everyone else being permanently stuck with that eventual throttle.

    tl;dr this is literally the sort of selective, content-favoring shenanigans that net neutrality was meant to prevent

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When did pay per view cable become illegal?

      When did movie theaters get the same tax breaks as churches?

      Delete
    2. Your argument on cable companies is the reason why we have satellite tv companies. If baseball and NFL leagues did what you said, no one would go and a New league would start. Creating competition, forcing the leagues to react or go out of business. And the scenario you have of the state only allowing you to go to certain institutions that are approved can only happen if the state is allowed to have control and intervene in the way YOU are advocating for. You are calling for the state(FCC) to step in. The more they are allowed to step in, the more likely your scenario is to happen.

      Delete
    3. The cable TV example is a bad one, for reasons given above.

      A more appropriate comparison for T-Mobile's illegal throttling/censorship scam can be found with a water utility.

      Under the law (Net Neutrality), what you do with the data you pay for is like what you do with the water you pay for.

      If T-Mobile took over the water utility, they'd be making you pay extra for water to cook carrots, while giving you "free" water to cook corn. It's all real crazy, and the mindless "Free Stuff" drones would whine about those about those wanting to take away the free water for boiling corn.

      And the equivalent of the person here who said it was illegal to watch non T-Mobile approved video would be found in someone claiming it is illegal to cook carrots with water.

      Delete
    4. Bad analogy. T-Mobile's privately owned data network is not a utility. They don't use Binge On to censor or block any video or music content. And no one posted that its illegal to watch video T-Mobile has not approved for Binge On management.

      Delete
  17. I could tell you why your points are irrelevant and deliberately obtuse, but I won't bother.

    Instead, I'd like to point out that Binge On is actually three separate violations of Net Neutrality rolled into a single service.

    It's like the BLT of regulatory violations:

    Bypassing caps
    Limiting inclusion
    Throttling

    And who doesn't want a bite of Legere's competition killing sandwich?

    Oh yeah, me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So now it's ILLEGAL to throttle customers who exceed their data cap? Oh boy, I can't wait to buy a cheap data plan and tether at home. Cheaper than xfiniti!

      Delete
    2. You're just jealous. FCC wrote the Net Neutrality principles, and they have no problems with Binge On after meeting with T-Mobile. Legere said any video company broadcasting legal material can join if they work with T-Mobile to help them identify the streams to be managed. More and more companies will do this. And since the streams are converted to DVD quality for mobile viewing, the speed reduction of Binge On video does not adversely affect the mobile experience. If a customer doesn't like any of this or wants to watch a movie via streaming HD to a big screen, they can easily turn off Binge On for that movie.
      If you want to watch illegal video material, you'll have to pay for it. Too bad. It's not T-Mobile's fault that they won't let you watch it free over their network.

      Delete
  18. And in the end, Legere's throttling/censorship scam bites consumers, providers, and everyone.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Providers love Binge On too. Rather than having T-Mobile optimize the video stream, providers can now opt to provide their own mobile-optimized video at native resolutions to Binge On customers. YouTube was be one of the first to capitalize on this feature, and it was a big reason why they joined.

      Additionally, T-Mobile is making it easier for video providers to exclude their content from mobile optimization or free streaming. Now, all it will take is an email to T-Mobile and the ability to meet certain technical criteria so T-Mobile can identify their video streams reliably.

      That's not all. Smaller Binge-On video partners REALLY love Binge On. Since subscribers are not charged for their video, they are MUCH more likely to try a new service. Win-Win-Win for everybody. Unless you don't get it, of course.

      Delete
    2. The above statement was partially lifted from T-Mobile press releases, and is partially verbatim from Wireless Weak

      http://www.wirelessweek.com/news/2016/03/youtube-finally-joins-t-mobiles-binge

      In particular, from by Diana Goovaerts, Associate Editor, @DiaMariesbeat.

      If you are going to present corporate PR text as your own opinion, can't you even make an effort to atribute the source in some fashion, or even use quotes around the writing that is not your own?

      Mindlessly cutting and pasting like you are doing is a form of spam.

      Delete
    3. The Wireless Week article is from March. It and this article are based on two different T-Mobile press releases. Any similarities are likely due to T-Mobile's PR person reusing phrases from one press release to the next.

      The "Source" link at the end of this post points to the T-Mobile source press release and that constitutes proper attribution.

      Delete
    4. Dennis: The post is indeed sourced as you describe. The PR piece that is "mindless cutting and pasting" without any attribution at all, is one of the comments in the middle here:

      "Anonymous May 19, 2016 at 8:12 AM"

      comment.

      Statements such as "If you are going to present corporate PR text as your own opinion, can't you even make an effort to attribute the source in some fashion, or even use quotes around the writing that is not your own?" certainly do NOT apply to any parent posts, even though they often apply to plagiarized PR material users put in comments.

      Delete
  19. "Most postpaid subscribers are not choosing AT&T brands over T-Mobile brands either."

    Check the 2016 Q1 subscriber totals for AT&T vs T-Mobile and get back with me. Subscribers are choosing AT&T by a two-to-one margin.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your math is faulty. in Q1, 2016, T-Mobile added 1.807 Million new postpaid and prepaid phone customers. AT&T only added 629 Thousand new phone customers. T-Mobile added 187% more new phone subscribers than AT&T. And where did most of those extra 1.171 Million customers come from? They left AT&T for T-Mobile, choosing better value and UnCarrier perks like Binge On.

      Delete
  20. Another stat related to this article: In March when it added YouTube to its list of Binge On video services, T-Mobile said its video partners represented 70% of all video watched by Un-carrier customers. That 70% statistic is now higher with the additional 13 services just added.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Implicit in this is the logic that it is OK for T-Mobile to downgrade video providers if they are not "popular".

      Well, that isn't as bad as the guy that said if T-Mobile doesn't approve it it is illegal video. But it is still bad.

      It's very uncompetitive. In a world of lawbreaking video content censorship such as T-Mobile is trying to make the norm, the next Youtube or Netflix will be shut out and denied a chance.

      Delete
    2. T-Mobile does not use Binge On to censor or block any video content.

      Delete
    3. Please stup the FUD. Maybe the general public falls for your line of crap but people like the readers of this blog know better.

      The simple honest truth is that websites that aren't on the list aren't "downgraded" by T-Mobile.

      The simple honest truth is you can turn off Binge On if you don't like it. Unlike voicemail, so why aren't you up in arms over that instead?

      On a website where people are informed, your FUD only makes you look like...well...exactly what you are.

      Delete
  21. "Providers love Binge On too...."

    Do you have the web link to the T-Mobile site press release this came from?

    Rather than having T-Mobile optimize the video stream, providers can now opt to provide their own mobile-optimized video at native resolutions to Binge On customers. YouTube was be one of the first to capitalize on this feature, and it was a big reason why they joined.

    Additionally, T-Mobile is making it easier for video providers to exclude their content from mobile optimization or free streaming. Now, all it will take is an email to T-Mobile and the ability to meet certain technical criteria so T-Mobile can identify their video streams reliably.

    "Smaller Binge-On video partners REALLY love Binge On."

    Wow, of course, the vast majority of video providers are blocked from Binge-On...

    ReplyDelete
  22. "If you want to watch illegal video material, you'll have to pay for it. Too bad. It's not T-Mobile's fault that they won't let you watch it free over their network."

    It's funny that now the T-Mobile PR person above is calling any video content not approved by T-Mobile "illegal".

    This is really proving the point about how bad it is to have a carrier break the law by censoring video on a company-by-company basis like this.

    There's no way I'm "jealous" of a carrier that censors and throttles video content (John decides) instead of leaving it up to the customer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "It's funny that now the T-Mobile PR person above is calling any video content not approved by T-Mobile "illegal"."
      Distortion, or just dumb?
      Legere is not going to help you watch pirated movies or child porn. Too bad. Is that why you are upset with Binge On? You want illegal content you watch to be free too?

      Delete
  23. "Your math is faulty."

    Oh? Again, check the Q1 2016 total subscribers in T-Mobile vs AT&T. You might be shocked: in real numbers, T-Mobile is significantly behind AT&T in the number of subscribers who choose it.

    "in Q1, 2016, T-Mobile added 1.807..."

    Meaningless. Look at the overall customer totals of both. That is where the truth is.

    "They left AT&T for T-Mobile, choosing better value and UnCarrier perks like Binge On."

    1) Customers choose AT&T over T-Mobile by a two-to-one basis. This is the most objective measure, and it shows that when it comes time to put their money on the line, customers think that AT&T has a better value.

    2) Using the "Uncarrier" slogan for T-Mobile is something only paid flacks do. Perhaps you are at one of those very rare T-Mobile store fronts? It shows a lack of objectivity, of course. Aside from the fact that "uncarrier" is a poor slogan for T-Mobile... a company which customers resoundingly reject, and doesn't have an actual good nationwide network. There's a lot of "un" there, really.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Millions of phone customers have left and are leaving AT&T for T-Mobile.
      The difference in current subscriber numbers is shrinking.
      T-Mobile is getting virtually all the growth in postpaid phones (98% in Q1 2016) and the clear majority of growth in prepaid (62% of the growth, while Verizon, Sprint and Tracfone had big losses). T-Mobile has 52% more prepaid phone customers than AT&T, and this difference is growing.
      Any business that thinks trends are "meaningless" is doomed to failure.
      AT&T certainly doesn't, but they still haven't been able to grow.
      T-Mobile is still growing fast in a phone subscriber market that has leveled off, with little overall growth.
      They say they are getting most of their growth from AT&T, then Verizon, which they report quarterly in their porting ratios.

      Delete
  24. Do they throttle data/video resolution?

    Compatible with chromecast or google cast mirroring?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If you tether your phone to a Chromecast or TV via WiFi it will not use your data as long as it's a compatible service. I use my Roku all the time with Sling TV and Netflix. Never touches my data.

      Delete
  25. People who don't want to use the Binge On feature can turn it off. That should be the end of it.

    The extremists aren't happy with that solution. They don't like other people having the freedom to make individual choices. They want to force their narrow minded position on everybody. They are the American Telecom Taliban.


    ReplyDelete
  26. The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, which describes itself as "a nonprofit, nonpartisan research and educational institute focusing on the intersection of technological innovation and public policy," published a paper in support of offerings that allow users to access content and services without incurring data charges.

    "The crux of the controversy is whether the practice of zero rating violates the spirt of network neutrality principles. Strictly speaking, zero-rated data is treated differently than other data in a way that influences consumer behavior. But adhering to such a strict interpretation of net neutrality would be misguided. Zero-rated products are unlikely to harm the open internet; instead they are a sign of healthy product differentiation that more efficiently allocates scarce resources in a competitive market, ultimately improving consumer value. The Federal Communications Commission - along with other regulators around the world - is examining zero rating, and while its case-by-case approach to overseeing these programs is sound, telecom regulators should make it clear that they believe nonexclusive zero-rating programs are in the public interest."

    http://www.fiercewireless.com/story/itif-bingo-and-zero-rated-data-unlikely-harm-open-internet/2016-05-23

    ReplyDelete
  27. T-Mobile just added a new bunch of video services to Binge On. PBS, PBS Kids and a few other partners like Azubu, Dailymotion Games and Eyegroove. This is the sixth time they have expanded the free mobile video service in seven months. More than 500 MILLION hours of free video has been watched via Binge On since launch last November. About 90 partners hooked up now.

    Come on, Binge On haters (who obviously don't get it). Post your envious rants now, and drive up the eyeball count to help pay for Dennis' vacation! I dare you.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I love the law and hate criminality and censorship. T-Mobile is still illegally throttling the vast majority of video providers.

    Come on, TMO. Obey the law. Put ALL data in Binge On. It's the right thing to do,as well as lrgal

    ReplyDelete
  29. Tmo just added 16 new partners – including ABC, Apple Music, Big Ten Network, DISH Anywhere, Disney Channel, Nat Geo TV, CEEK VR and Shalom World. They offer more than 100 partners now, more than 4X the 22 they had at launch 8 months ago. More details here:
    https://www.wirelessweek.com/news/2016/07/t-mobiles-binge-has-quadrupled-size-8-months-launch

    ReplyDelete
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