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T-Mobile Adds Gaming Content to List of Binge On Services

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 It's T-Mobile Tuesdays once again and thankfully, everything went flawlessly compared to last week's fiasco. T-Mobile customers were able to enjoy their share of free pizza, Wendy's Frosty, and a movie. But if you think that's all that was given away today, the Un-Carrier threw in something extra.

Earlier, T-Mobile announced that they have added new services to their famous Binge On service. With today's announcement, T-Mobile has expanded their services to include Eyegroove, YouTube Gaming, Dailymotion Games, Azubu, PBS, and PBS Kids.

These new additions now make up Binge On's list of almost 90 streaming providers that can be accessed by each user for free. This is now the sixth time T-Mobile expanded its streaming list in less than a year ever since it was launched. The services added today focuses more on gaming to pique the interest of those who enjoy these services. There were some user-generated content and broadcast services added on the line-up too.

As of this writing, Binge On subscribers have streamed over 500 million hours of video; a number that has increased from 377 million hours which was last reported mid-May of this year. This goes to show just how much T-Mobile subscribers are enjoying streaming their favorite content without worrying about running out of high-speed data.


Source: TMONews

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20 comments:

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  1. PBS and PBS Kids is far from gaming but very nice additions. #wewontstop #uncarrier

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  2. Between articles and the Sunday Best Phones blog, you're doing a good job holding down the fort while Dennis is gone, Christine.

    Thanks for your hard work.

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  3. Still no Dailymotion, Nico Nico Douga, Twitch, Pornhub, MFC, or even Kisscartoon.

    Still no common sense regulation to preserve net neutrality.

    Still no hope for the future of the mobile internet.

    Thanks, T-mobile.

    You'll just keep on pissing in the digital pool, because the lifeguard's too busy being on the take to stop you.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for the tip on those site! I never heard of Nico Nico and MFC!

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    2. Those are just the tip of the iceberg.

      As of now, Tudou, Bilibili, Vimeo, Youku, Soundcloud, v.ku6 and Xvideos are also excluded, as are a number of sites that host their own videos.

      If you were really designing a system to throttle and zero-rate all streamed media, you'd have to apply it unilaterally (without gatekeeping) just to cover even half the internet.

      But since T-mobile isn't doing that, they have no defense against the charge that they're favoring bigger services (who're more likely to sign on) over smaller ones (who may have never heard of Binge On).

      Anyway, don't get too attached to non-Binge sites.

      If the FCC is this incompetent, it won't be long before you can ONLY stream from pre-approved sources.

      For your own good, of course.

      Delete
    3. "If the FCC is this incompetent, it won't be long before you can ONLY stream from pre-approved sources."

      Excellent reason to be in the 80%+ of mobile users who say NO to T-Mobile and illegal data censorship. Those who don't rely on Big Brother John, and can choose video sources without being fined by the carrier for choosing one the carrier does not like.

      Delete
    4. "If you were really designing a system to throttle and zero-rate all streamed media, you'd have to apply it unilaterally (without gatekeeping) just to cover even half the internet."

      To avoid breaking existing law, you'd have to zero rate ALL data, not just streaming media.

      Delete
  4. "Still no...."

    The vast majority of video content providers are on the "wrong" side of the T-Mobile Binge On scheme (which would more accurately be called "Binge No"), which means that T-Mobile is charging you extra to watch video from content providers it doesn't like, compared to video providers it does like.

    This is not the way the Internet is supposed to work (content choices made by the viewer and the provider, without a censoring middleman)... and it is dangerous for the future of free communication, as well as a very bad idea and illegal.

    There's better out there, such as unlimited plans from much better carriers. Carriers that don't care what you watch, and don't punish with extra fees you for not agreeing with their very narrow viewing choices.

    "Still no common sense regulation to preserve net neutrality."

    There is a common sense law in place, and T-Mobile is breaking it.

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    Replies
    1. You keep spending/wasting your money with larry, moe, and curly pal. Hang on to that unlimited Verizon plan as long as you can. Everyone is giving Big John and Company their business now. Maybe you'll see the light someday....

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    2. " Everyone is giving Big John and Company their business now"

      Everyone except the 80%+ of mobile users who reject T-Mobile and go elsewhere.

      Delete
  5. We all have to wait until the Supreme Court decides whether FCC even has the *authority* to regulate the Internet under the 1934 law. Then maybe FCC will make a decision about Binge On and the Verizon Go90 pay-to-play service. It's funny how people never complain about Go90, where every service has to pay Verizon $$$ to stream video free to the mobile customer. With Binge On, T-Mobile will let any service participate if they work with Tmo so that Tmo can ID the streams. If a company can't be bothered, blame them.

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    Replies
    1. " If a company can't be bothered, blame them. "

      Wow. What ever happened to a company being able to just put stuff on the Internet and anyone can consume it?

      With what you defend, a company has to "bother" to petition a fickle gatekeeper in order to avoid a default situation where people are fined by the gatekeeping company for consuming the content.

      Delete
    2. "What ever happened to a company being able to just put stuff on the Internet and anyone can consume it?"
      Nothing happened. T-Mobile, doesn't block any videos just because they're are not part of Binge On.
      "a default situation where people are fined by the gatekeeping company for consuming the content."
      Twisted spin. No fine, no foul.

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    3. T-Mobile doesn't block most providers specifically. They do however charge extra to watch through video.

      Delete
    4. "It's funny how people never complain about Go90, where every service has to pay Verizon"

      The people who use Verizon don't care about data, otherwise they wouldn't be using Verizon.

      Delete
  6. Some of you people should be protesting Net Nanny and other companies that actually censor internet content.

    Public libraries too. Not only do many libraries censor the internet, most don't have subscriptions to Penthouse even when they have other magazines with lower circulation. Now that is censorship.

    Free speech supporters can't opt out of paying taxes to support the anti-first-amendment libraries. Anybody can opt out of BingeOn or paying for T-Mobile period.

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    Replies
    1. "Free speech supporters can't opt out of paying taxes to support the anti-first-amendment libraries. Anybody can opt out of BingeOn or paying for T-Mobile period."

      Nice try... But your claim that it is OK for T-Mobile to illegally censor data because customers can go elsewhere is like saying it is OK for a bakery to put rat poison in donuts because customers can go to other bakers that don't do this.

      Delete
    2. No data is censored. And if you don't want a piece of those 500 Million+ free hours watched, go to a different carrier and be "charged extra" or "be fined" for all the mobile video you watch. That way you can feel "legal."

      Delete
  7. Facebook is working with T-Mobile to join Binge On.

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