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Comcast to Sell Prepaid TV and Internet Service Via Select Boost Mobile Locations

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Earlier today, Comcast announced its partnership with Sprint's prepaid brand, Boost Mobile. According to the announcement, this partnership will enable Comcast to use select Boost Mobile retail locations throughout the country as a venue where it can sell its Xfinity Prepaid broadband internet and TV service. To start, the service will be offered later this year in Illinois, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, and Michigan. Soon after, Comcast plans to expand the service and offer it in all 4,400 Boost Mobile locations by the end of 2017.

The partnership will allow Xfinity customers to sign up for Comcast's prepaid service or make a monthly payment at the specified Boost Mobile location. With this partnership, Sprint will be able to increase its retail exposure by igniting the interest of the public in one of the postpaid and prepaid services they offer. Especially after losing about 264,000 net connections during this year's first trimester. 

For its part, this partnership will be advantageous to Comcast as well. This is particularly because Comcast's Xfinity Prepaid service aims at making pay TV a suitable option once again, especially since its growth has substantially slowed over the years. With this new service, customers can easily sign up for cable TV service under a "pay as you go" scheme. They can go to a participating Boost Mobile location to sign up for the service, pay a one-time fee for equipment, and then get either the seven or 30-day subscription. And the best part about the Xfinity Prepaid service is that customers can easily sign up without the need of undergoing a credit check or even sign a contract that would bind them for several months. These restrictions are being waived by Comcast as a way of signing up more subscribers. In the same way, this benefits customers who prefer a flexible option when getting cable service. 

The announced partnership between Comcast and Sprint rekindles a long-lost relationship that stems back to the mid-1990s; around the time when Sprint PCS was first formed. Hopefully, this will be a new partnership that will be equally beneficial for all parties.


Source: RCRWireless

22 comments:

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  1. The first step in the door for its coming mobile service....beware!

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    1. Why beware?? More competition is always welcome.

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    2. The "Beware" warning is probably from the mindset that hates the idea of Walmart competing by providing better service and lower prices.

      "How dare they!"

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  2. The last thing we need is for Comcast to get any bigger

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    1. Comcast is a company I've heard of in the news, but I've never personally encountered it in 48 years if bring a cable customer.

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    2. Have you lived in the same area for those 48 years?

      Local governments limit cable TV competition in exchange for bribes, I mean concession fees, paid by the companies who don't have to compete on price.

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  3. i'm wondering if the prepaid comcast service is going to be more expensive?

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  4. Comcast prepaid internet service will probably be pretty popular since cable modems only cost $80 - $100. But I don't understand how the TV service will work with cable boxes, especially, DVR boxes costing hundreds of dollars.

    Comcast's wireless service will run on the Verizon network but I doubt it will cost less than Verizon Prepaid.

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  5. Is the idea that you use boost wireless to get your tv or is this just another way to pay for cable?

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    1. Its more like Cricket selling phones at GameStop.

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  6. I will wait for people to use it first and then report on how it is and pro's and cons about the service.

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  7. If the internet plan is cheaper per month than Boost it may do okay. Otherwise, when they're down to the last $40 of their paychecks, I think they will pay for smartphone not home.

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  8. I think prepaid cable TV is an idea long overdue. I know that Dish offers it but no other company that I can think of does.

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    1. True, cable TV and, more importantly, internet is a postpaid business model that's struggling to attract new customers in an increasingly prepare world. Dish requires its prepaid customers to spend hundreds of dollars to buy their own satellite equipment. I have to wonder how many people are willing to pay for proprietary cable boxes. Prepaid cable TV would make sense if we had a variety of cable TV equipment available for purchase from electronics retailers. Without that I suspect prepaid cable TV won't be anywhere near as popular as prepaid wireless.

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    2. And then if it rains, you can't watch DishTV.

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    3. Jason in PortlandJuly 24, 2016 at 9:24 AM

      It rains in Portland, Oregon, all the time. Heavily at times. Never had a weather-related signal issue with a satellite dish, and we've had a satellite service from 1998-2003 and again from 2013-Present (family decision, was outvoted). Stating false information simply reflects poorly on the pay TV industry.

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  9. Many of those companies are actually prepaid, because they make customers pay in advance for each month of service. That's the worst of both worlds. Pay in advance each month but customers are locked into a contract. No wonder they struggle.

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    1. Yeah but they don't require customers to buy the equipment. Without a credit check they won't be handing out cable boxes for free.

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  10. I wonder if there is an installation fee.

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  11. My predictions:

    * Up front eqipment costs, but you still don't own the devices.

    * Greater installation fees.

    * Higher premiums.

    * No differentiation from their regular offerings, meaning no a la carte pricing for channels or pay-per-megabit bandwidth.

    * Hard sells for costly service plans on both Comcast and Boost.

    In other words, it's basically nothing.

    What people really want is lower prices, less taxes, real competition, the abolition of cable fiefdoms, technicians showing up within a single hour window, a la carte channels and paying less for the internet speeds you really need instead of paying more for what you don't (given that there's almost a whole ~20mbs between 6 and 25).

    Oh, and better VoD that actually has the episodes after they air, instead of sometime in the future (whenever they get around to it), even when the networks' online apps or websites (as well as good ol' reliable IP pirates) already have them uploaded and available within hours.

    So yeah, apparently the Big C is doing everything in its power to signal hope and change without actually making any of the changes that really matter.

    Honestly, that makes me love to hate them even more.

    They're literally a corporate baron unto themselves, sometimes with a government enabled monopoly, and yet they're still too miserly to improve in any way.

    At this point, it seems like the only thing that'll rattle such a Scrooge McSuck is a visit from the ghost of cable's future.

    You know, the one it might not have.

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    1. "....In other words, it's basically nothing....."

      Just like Boost. A good fit.

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  12. This is interesting. I went to Prepaid Xfinity website and it doenest mention about the download limit each month.

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