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Project Fi Users Can Now Enjoy High Speed International Data in Over 135 Countries

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After adding support for U.S. Cellular for Project Fi last month, Google has once again made new improvements for its cellular service. Beginning today, customers using Project Fi will be able to enjoy high-speed international data in over 135 countries and destinations. This improvement comes after Google added Three as its partner for Project Fi. With Three on board, customers are able to enjoy data browsing at speeds that are up to 20 times faster compared to before.

And that's not the best part yet-- the best part is that this international high-speed data is available to all Project Fi customers for no extra cost. It's the same $10 per GB rate, which now comes with high-speed data when you travel to one of the countries on the list. Among these countries include Australia, Canada, China, Germany, France, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the United Kingdom and many more.

In line with this new feature, Google has a special deal exclusively available for the Nexus 6P. You can enjoy $150 off the price of the Nexus 6P once you sign up for Project Fi service. With this special deal, that means you'll only have to pay a minimum of $349 for the Nexus 6P instead of its full price. The catch, however, is that you need to keep your Project Fi service active for a minimum of 30 days. If you don't, you'll be charged the $150 used on the deal. This special deal for the Nexus 6P is only available until July 19th.


Source: PhoneDog

21 comments:

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  1. I would certainly use Fi if it relied on AT&T and Sprint instead of T-Mobile.

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    1. Yes, except Sprint is worse than T-mobile in most areas, maybe not yours.

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    2. That's why I said I would... Not that everyone should.
      But even AT&T alone would do.

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    3. Does it really matter? The coverage is pretty large considering you encompass WiFi, T-mobile, Sprint, & US Cellular handing off to whichever has better signal. T-mobile only issue is coverage. Most of the issues should be mitigated by the multi-network support.

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    4. "Does it really matter?" Again, to me it does. T-mo and Sprint= not good enough. AT&T= Very good.
      Im speaking about the cellular aspect of it. When Im out in the boonies with no Wi-Fi access who do I want for cellular service...hmmm T-Mobile or Sprint? not really.

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  2. How Project Fi is not under an anti-trust investigation is beyond me. The only phones you can use--over publicly owned spectrum, might I add--are Nexus, when Apple has had jointly Sprint and T-Mobile compatible iPhones and now Samsung has an S7 out as well.

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    1. Well they probably have some proprietary software to make Project Fi or something of that sorts to handoff calls between wifi and the multiple network it supports. This is similar to what Republic Wireless had in it early days.

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    2. I guess only newer Nexus phones (starting at 6) have the firmware to do the multi-carrier auto-switch. The anti-trust issue would not apply until Apple and Samsung start offering such capability. Supporting the bands and access standards alone is not enough. There were a lot of academic research on seamless multi-technology hand-off and big players in Telco never cared to have a business case for it, until Google stepped in with Project Fi.

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    3. In it's FAQ, Google says:

      "These devices are the first smartphones that support our network of networks. They work with the Project Fi SIM card, which supports multiple cellular networks, and have a state-of-the-art cellular radio tuned to work across network types."

      Doesn't sound super proprietary to me. Sprint and USCC probably have roaming agreements so that hand-off shouldn't be too difficult, but T-Mobile to CDMA I can see being an issue...but Google doesn't say anything about that.

      Fi SIM cards work in non-Nexus phones with variable success: data may or may not work, VVM notifications, etc. Plus the SIM card may have to be activated in a Nexus.

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  3. I would rather choose Verizon for cheap plan and cheap company"s prepaid data.

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    1. Tmobile is by far the WORST of the big 4!and sprint signal is much better than even at&t,expecially after sprint launched lte plus,it's very fast,and even when no lte available,sprint 3g is much better than tmo 2g!

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    2. While that's true for where you are comparing, it's not true everywhere. Here in Northern California, T-Mobile has far more LTE coverage and far more overall coverage than Sprint.

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  4. You could pay $350 for a phone, $10 for 1GB, and $20 for basic TnT on Project Fi.

    Or you could pay $50 for a phone, $10 for 1GB, and $20 (after a group discount) for TnT with 2.5GB of data on Cricket, minus $75-125 in bill credits with porting and a referral.

    Then you can take an additional $25 off for everone you refer, up to a total of $200.

    The best part is, it runs on AT&T instead of Sprint or T-Mobile, which means coverage is just that much more reliable.

    Honestly, Project Fi just isn't putting in the work to stay competitive, just like Google Fiber left millions of Americans at the mercy of Big Cable fiefdoms.

    With Cricket and TW stepping up, Google needs to get their act together if they want to justify charging $350 for a glorified paperweight.



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    1. Please scratch off TW. The worst support of any MVNO I've ever known. Glitchy systems and horrible management. People on a budget deserve way better than that.
      I haven't tried cricket but I have TW and do not wish it upon my worst enemy.

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    2. Apples and oranges. Project Fi data works in 135 countries at no extra charge, Cricket works in 3 countries at most. Project Fi supports WiFi calling, Cricket does not. Project Fi roams domestically including in places Cricket has no coverage.

      Project Fi is not trying to compete with Cricket. It targets a different customer base than Cricket. Cricket suits your needs better than Project Fi, for others the opposite is true. Choice is good.

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    3. I hoping that they might become competitive in the near future. Until then, Tmo prepaid best fits my calling needs.

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    4. Another thought I have is that Fi is just beta testing for Comcast's eventual foray into the wireless space. Google might have a closer relationship to big cable than we are aware of.

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  5. I would certainly use Fi if it relied on Verizon and T-Mobile instead of Sprint.

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    1. The problem is Verizon is probably not cost effective compared to Sprint.

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    2. Maybe but with the Hi Fi prices, who knows? I'm on the Verizon network via RP eBay plan, with data, for less than Fi charges for just talk.

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    3. "Maybe but with the Hi Fi prices, who knows? I'm on the Verizon network via RP eBay plan"
      RP I'm assuming red pocket... What plan do you have and how much data?

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