Home - , , - Leaked Photos Show Model Numbers, Wireless Info for Upcoming HTC Nexus Devices

Leaked Photos Show Model Numbers, Wireless Info for Upcoming HTC Nexus Devices

htc-nexus-sailfish-marlin-model-numbers
It's no secret that HTC is currently working on a couple of Nexus smartphones--called the Nexus Sailfish and Nexus Marlin. These two devices are slated for a release later in the year. But recently, both devices have been the subject of news reports as photos and mockups have leaked to the public; thus revealing details regarding its specs and design. 

Based on earlier leaks, the Nexus Sailfish will be recognized as a successor to the Nexus 5X. It is said to be equipped with a 5-inch 1080p display, Snapdragon 820 processor with 4GB of RAM, 16/32GB storage options, a 2,770 mAh battery, and 12MP/8MP camera setup. Meanwhile, the Nexus Marlin is said to offer a 5.5-inch Quad HD display and the same processor-RAM configuration and camera setup as the Sailfish. However, the storage on the Marlin is bumped up to 32GB and 128GB; along with a 3,450 mAh battery.

More importantly, today's leaks prove that both upcoming Nexus devices have already passed through FCC. And this means that the two phones have obtained an approval for use in the US. Although it's not really too much of a surprise, it was revealed that the two phones will be offered by Verizon; which means their development stage is already coming to a close.

A notable bit about the FCC filings is that a letter from HTC Project Manager Sean Shih in the Draft User Manual Section. According to the letter, HTC will be publicly making final user guides for the two devices available on Google's Nexus support website along with its commercial release.

In addition to the FCC, SAR Reports for the two phones include a list of wireless bands that are being supported by the phones. The list includes the following:

htc-nexus-sailfish-marlin-model-numbers


Lastly, the model numbers for both devices are confirmed through FCC labels: G-2PW2100 and G-2PW4100; though there's no word on which of these model numbers belong to which. With these leaked information coming from the FCC directly, previous leaks of the two devices suggesting the two Nexus phones work across carriers and also Google's Project Fi service are given credibility.


Source:  TMO News

28 comments:

Comment Page :
  1. so these phones will be sold only on verizon prepaid plans?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, as Nexus devices they will be sold primarily by the Google Play Store and will be unlocked.

      Delete
  2. Isn't the whole premise of a nexus device to keep development open? If there's no development it might as well be another samsung galaxy or note product, bloated and locked down.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nexus devices have always been rootable and have had bootloaders that can be unlocked. I expect there will be lots of ROM development for the Sailfish and Marlin.

      Delete
  3. A shame they killed the more affordable Play Edition models. Where are the $99 Nexus models?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Nexus 4, 5, and 5x were relatively affordable. The only GPE model that was more affordable was the Moto G at $180.

      Delete
  4. A 12MP camera on what will probably be a $400 or $500+ phone?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Camera quality has very little to do with MPs. Optics, sensor site and image processing are much more important. Samsung Galaxy S7, and iPhone 6s have 12MP cameras and are generally considered to have the best cameras of all current phones.

      Delete
    2. Megapixels are a major part of camera photo quality actually.

      Delete
    3. Actually, no it's not. Dennis is right. Learn about sensor size #1, optics, etc.

      Delete
    4. Megapixels are extremely important. If you crop or zoom in to a small part of the photograph. And you have low megapixels, you will just get a blur. Well, other factors help, the more megapixels the better. There's no logic to arguing otherwise. And that has no factual basis at all.

      If you doubt me, compare a very simple video image. Let's say the old 8-bit Mario. See how he looks at 8 by 8 pixels. Then compare how he looks at two by two pixels. There is a huge difference.

      I myself moved from an S6 phone to an S7 phone. I noticed that the detail of distant objects and buildings has actually gone down. Well other quality indicators are great. You'd be crazy to argue that if everything else were kept the same that a 20-megapixel camera isn't a lot better than a 12 megapixel camera.


      The idea that having good high megapixels in a camera was somehow a drawback came out a few years ago from makers of devices with cheap junkie low-res pixel cameras. It's an illogical myth.

      Delete
    5. The above post is all bunk, based on marketing hype. The number of megapixels is certainly not the most important factor in picture quality.
      Optics, sensor size and image processing are much more important, as Dennis says. Everybody who has used and studied various cameras knows this.

      Delete
    6. The only marketing hype is in the above comment. The more megapixels, the better photo. This has nothing to do with marketing hype, and everything to do with real world experience.

      "Optics, sensor size .... [blah blah blah]"

      If those are the same between two cameras, and the other camera has more megapixels, the one with more megapixels is better.

      Delete
    7. Such ignorance screams out for enlightenment. From PhoneScoop's review of the Galaxy S7:
      "For a while it seemed as though Samsung might fall victim to the megapixel wars, amping up the number of pixels indefinitely in order to appear more powerful. But photo pros know that megapixels aren't everything, and that has apparently sunk in with the folks over at Samsung. That's why the S7 trades the 16-megapixel sensor from the S6 for a higher-quality 12-megapixel sensor. Samsung says the pixels are larger to improve low-light capture, among other advantages."

      Delete
    8. You only proved your own ignorance.

      Megapixels aren't everything. but they are most of it.

      An S7 with higher-quality 16 mp sensor would be a lot better than the same thing in 12 mp.

      You aren't thinking about what you are typing there.

      Delete
  5. No new band on the phone and taking out band 29 from Nexus 6p. Why should I get this phone when I have a nexus 6 that I bought for $200 4 months ago?

    ReplyDelete
  6. Expensive flagships?

    Pass.

    I wouldn't pay more than $100 for a phone.

    On a side note, 4100 is the Marlin.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. what phone do you have? just curious...

      Delete
    2. He's prolly gots da Alcatel Idol 3 on Cricket Wireless for their previous $50 port-in deal & pays over $400/year for service. But who can tell one Anonymous from another?

      Delete
    3. I'm the 4th Anonymous. I agree with that the third Anonymous said about the Nexus, but not about what the 5th Anonymous said about the camera .

      Delete
    4. "He's prolly gots da Alcatel Idol 3 on Cricket Wireless for their previous $50 port-in deal & pays over $400/year for service. "

      After discounts and bill credits, the overall cost for an Idol 3 and one year of service is about $280.

      It's $240/yr after that.

      And in a couple months, I can even get the Idol 3 unlocked for use on whatever good GSM MVNO deals pop up in the future.

      There's literally no better deal than that, at least not since FEDmageddon killed RingPlus.

      Delete
  7. are band 10/66 even up and running yet?

    ReplyDelete
  8. Based on Geekbench the phones will probably have the Snapdragon 821, rather than the Snapdragon 820. The last uploads for both phones show the processor as "ARM implementer 81 architecture 8 variant 2 part 517 revision 0", and I haven't seen the "variant 2" part listed on Snapdragon 820 models.

    ReplyDelete
  9. tired of unlock phones being so expensive

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. and so am I...but nicer things cost more money...

      Delete
    2. They're not any "nicer."

      The carriers just haven't broken their legs.

      What I'd like is for the FCC to crack down on leg-breaking, in the form of both sim-locking and ESN blacklisting, so that any phones can be used on any network.

      Delete
    3. The FCC....hmmm...keep on wishing...

      Delete
Comment Page :