Home - , , , - Report Says Credo Mobile Has Moved to Verizon

Report Says Credo Mobile Has Moved to Verizon

credo-mobile
A source close to Fierce Wireless earlier reported that Credo Mobile has switched its host network. Prior to this report, the MVNO used to operate under Sprint. According to the source, however, Credo Mobile switched to Verizon as its host network over the weekend. When asked for comments, officials from neither Credo Mobile, Sprint or Verizon accepted a request. For Sprint and Verizon, this was considered as a standard practice they had to uphold for the privacy of their MVNO partners.

The source states that the reason for the move was for Credo to accommodate its new customer activations except for the ones who plan to bring in their own devices. Although they have moved to Verizon, the MVNO is said to still make use of Sprint's network to give way for BYOD customers; especially since only 10 percent of new customers decide to do so. Apart from the 10 percent, the rest of Credo's new customers purchase phones from them directly. The source has attributed these figures from the 100,000 customers of Credo.

While there hasn't been an official announcement from Credo, the report seems to be reflected on their website. Before this weekend, Credo says that its wireless network services are "provided on the Nationwide Sprint Network." A visit to the website shows that this statement has been changed and that the MVNO now offers "nationwide 4G LTE coverage. Because it matters." There is no direct mention of who its new host network is. But judging on the latest network tagline of Verizon: "better matters", this is a close hint.

As of this writing, it still isn't verified whether or not Credo has decided to move away from Sprint. If it were, however, it certainly isn't the first MVNO to make this decision. Earlier this year, Republic Wireless (another Sprint MVNO) signed an agreement with a carrier that offered GSM wireless network. Back in 2013, PTel Mobile also switched to T-Mobile after dropping Sprint. It's important to note tough that PTel has already shut down this year).

We'll have to stay tuned for an official statement from Credo Mobile. Hopefully, they are only making these changes for the betterment of its customers, especially if this is a change that will affect the way they conduct business.


Source: Fierce Wireless

Tags: , , ,

27 comments:

Comment Page :
  1. Sprint is toxic.

    When someone hears Sprint, they think "no bars" and "spotty coverage."

    Coupled the the growing impression that Sprint has no future thanks to corruption, incompetence and mismanagement at the highest levels, it's really a wonder more Sprint MVNOs aren't jumping ship.

    Or rather, it'd be a surprise if there's even any left that haven't at least added another network as a "backup plan."

    There's also been bad blood between Sprint and the prepaid community ever since FEDmageddon killed the last MVNO with 2¢ paygo.

    At this point, Sprint's such a damaged brand/network that they'd literally have to pay savvy MVNOs and customers just to do business with them.

    Unless the market can somehow sustain an undead pseudo-competitor, they'll eventually be sold off, scrapped, or wind up in bankruptcy court.

    Good for Credo, though.

    They're looking out for both themselves and their customers.

    ReplyDelete
  2. "When someone hears Sprint, they think "no bars" and "spotty coverage."

    Just like with T-Mobile, only with T-Mobile, it is a little less so now.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Good news... much better coverage (ability to use the phone) and much better network quality.

    On top of that, Sprint has notoriously chaotic and capricious policies toward its MVNO's, like what it did to make it hard to activate phones on RingPlus. This is much much less a problem with Verizon.

    It's MUCH better than switching from Sprint to T-Mobile, because going to Verizon makes a huge difference in coverage, as opposed to "a little better".

    ReplyDelete
  4. "When someone hears Sprint, they think "no bars" and "spotty coverage."

    Sounds like as dry Kentucky county, doesn't it? No bars at all. Maybe a mangy Dalmatian sidling down the dusty street, too. But still, "no bars" and "spotty coverage" is a fair description of T-Mobile at this time also.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I find it difficult to find out a basic answer: how much are the plans? I have to do too much work to find out basic info. Credo is too busy trying to sell phones and warranty plans. I'll pass...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Credo is not a very good deal. Plans are here: Configure Your Plan: CREDO Mobile

      Prices start at $30 + taxes and fees for unlimited T&T on a non-smartphone.
      Smartphone plans start at $70 for unlimited T&T, 1GB

      A 2 year contract is required for all plans!!

      Delete
    2. Credo's current prices are...

      $50/1GB
      $60/3GB
      $80/6GB
      $100/10GB

      That's the promotional price, which halves line fees and nets you a free iPhone 6s.

      Add $20/mo after the promo ends.

      $70/1GB
      $80/3GB
      $100/6GB
      $120/10GB

      Or, in terms of regular bi-annual cost (since you'd be on a 2-year contract)...

      $1680 for 1GB/mo
      $1920 for 3GB/mo
      $2400 for 6GB/mo
      $2880 for 10GB/mo

      In contrast, here's the biannual cost of Cricket's plans with a group discount, excluding discounts, promos, referral credits, and the cost of a phone.

      $480 for 2.5GB/mo
      $720 for 5GB/mo
      $960 for 10GB/mo
      $1200 for Unlimited

      Another $650 would net you a Cricket 6s or S7, all while saving you around $1000 to $1500 over the course of two years.

      As for those who still need Verizon coverage, Total Wireless offers 5GB/mo for a bi-annual cost of $840, or a third of what it would cost on Credo.

      Anyway, if you're wondering why Credo's prices are so high, they're basically a "country club carrier."

      You pay more to pretend you're better than everyone else.

      That's it.

      Even if they include roaming, it's still pretty much a scam.

      In fact, it's been a scam for years:

      http://www.thepeoplesview.net/main/epeoplesview.net/2013/12/why-progressives-shouldnt-fall-for.html

      Delete
  6. Those plan's are horrible. How do they stay in business especially since they tab on Sprint until recently?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Credo is literally a SJW activist group. I'm not even trolling, just check wikipedia.

      They openly deal in partisan (aka controversial) political activism.

      With that being the case, they may be in bed with liberal cronies and progressive venture capitalists (similar to how Lyca was in bed with dictators).

      Or maybe they just sustain themselves on the virtue signaling of rich smug liberals who brag about their progressive mobile plan to all their friends, all while sipping on a $100 glass of wine in what they consider to be a run down food shack, a few minutes after screaming at some homeless people they passed by near the entrance for not being as progressively "enlightened" (translation: wealthy and successful) as them.

      Of course, they'll also be periodically checking their $800 iPhones (made by impoverished, overworked, potentially suicidal chinese factory slaves at Foxconn) for texts from their friends congratulating them on caring so much about "the oppressed."

      But really, unless you're a well off liberal shill who can afford a Verizon postpaid plan on the side for "real" coverage, you probably weren't using Credo's Sprint service to begin with.

      In fact, if you'll all join me in putting on these tinfoil hats, you could even say that Credo's switch to Verizon was meant to appease its existing customers and enable them to pay for service from only one carrier, thereby reducing the risk of being dumped when a customer decides to tighten their belt a little.

      Sure, it's a stretch. But it does make a lot more sense than Credo deciding to switch networks on a mere whim.

      On a side note, for all its progressive leanings, Credo's prices don't even offer "the underpriveleged and oppreesed" a good deal on phones or service, which would provide them helpful internet access as a tool in turning their lives around.

      Instead, it's a self-congratulating ego boost that only pretends to care, all while making bank on overpriced Verizon service for the fiscally endowed.

      They're basically a real life caricature of a liberal leaning MVNO, with all the hypocrisy, arrogance and pricing out of "peons" that entails.

      It's actually pretty sad, because there are much less notable non-political MVNOs who thanklessly try to provide much cheaper service to all people from all walks of life.

      They don't always succeed, but at least they never become outright repulsive on a personal level.

      tl;dr Total Wireless and Boom are better alternatives, both economically and ethically

      Delete
    2. Anyone who really cares about other people would never send them to any America Movil brand MVNO. NO Total wireless.

      Delete
    3. "NO Total wireless"
      I agree 100% with you. America Movil brands are far worse than any other companies out there. I know first hand experience.

      Delete
    4. SERIOUSLY. How did that political BS drivel get approved (and why)?

      Delete
  7. Replies
    1. I thought political views were not accepted here especially if stated as facts.
      I don't like credo and never will because of their crappy plans but I can care less about everything else said beyond that.

      Delete
    2. If my previous comment was too much to read, then here's the overall point:

      Don't read articles or comments about political activists who sell cell service based on political activism if you don't want to read about politics

      Also, don't watch the news or read newspapers either.

      Be sure to steer clear of news websites, too.

      Oh, and don't talk to anyone during an election year.

      In fact, becoming a hermit on an uncharted would probably be the only surefire way to escape politics altogether.

      Otherwise, they have a habit of popping up.

      Especially when someone posts an article about a business known primarily for using political activism to compensate for its uncompetitive prices.

      Delete
    3. This website has a tendency to remove even slightly liberal comments not just the far out leftist ones while allowing right-wing comments to remain. I'm a centrist myself and I like this site but I have to admit this sites right-wing bias annoys me sometimes.

      Delete
    4. This site completely lacks a "right wing" bias. Dennis has tilted to the left some on labor union issues and also taxation, and his Net Neutrality views (far and away the most political thing he weighs in on a lot) are not the least bit right-wing.

      I wonder if the "centrist" commenter above is really sitting happily in the middle of the left wing instead of the center. It sure seems so.

      But even if it were true that this site were some how "right wing" (in favor of the people controlling things instead of the government controlling things), since most of the media tilts leftist, having something right-of-center might be refreshing.

      Delete
    5. Where's my reply??

      Delete
  8. I have been a credo customer for years. Never once ever paid for a phone. Ever. 3 lines 15 phones in 8 yrs. Never paid for one. They are the best. If u are going to sit and judge them at least be a customer of theirs. And the prices who ever that was that listed them, is incorrect.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Credo's current prices, before taxes and fees, listed on their website for a single smartphone line are:
      $70/1GB
      $80/3GB
      $100/6GB
      $120/10GB
      You may pay less but those are the prices Credo advertises to new customers.

      Delete
    2. Dennis Bournique, this is an absolute lie about their pricing. Anyone can go to http://www.credomobile.com/plans/ and see that you are lying. Good lord! You must have an agenda. The pricing starts at 1gb for &30 to 10 gb for $80.

      Delete
    3. 1GB for $30 to 10GB for $80 is before adding the mandatory line fee.

      The prices I listed include the $40/month line fee for a subsidized smartphone and match what's on the website. It's $20/month less if you bring your own phone or buy a phone outright.

      Delete
  9. Can we please remove ALL political hints and comments here please? I have a real hard time focusing on prepaid things that matter. I don't care to see ANY political opinions or perceptions of any kind. If I want to see politics I can just turn on the tv. I'm sick of all that and would never expect to see anything like it in places like this.
    Save you political views, whatever they are, to yourself. I don't care about what Dennis political views are either, just like I don't give two craps about your religion, sexual orientation, disability status etc.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For all the bitching about politics, you'd think commenters like yourself would be decrying Credo itself for being openly political since, in your opinions, politics have no place in the prepaid market.

      In fact, if anyone even bothered to DYOR on Credo, you'd run into this little gem on their official website:

      "More than just a phone company

      We're a progressive company that has donated over $81 million to nonprofit groups and funds a network that channels the power of its 4 million members to fight for social change. Ready to join?"

      But I guess Credo's politics are ok as long as they're your politics, and anyone criticizing Credo is just a raving right-winger.

      It couldn't possibly be that some people agree that prepaid carriers shouldn't advertise themselves as being politically affiliated, and choose to disparage Credo for that very reason.

      Delete
    2. You are very good at assuming things aren't you? I'm not interested in Credo as a company or as a political vehicle. It is amazing tho how defensive you get about your own political views. For the record, in not a leftist or right wing or even center. I'm just not interested in politics period.
      I'm not attacking you or anyone here whether left or right. All I'm saying is I don't want to hear anything about politics. Is that too hard to comprehend?
      And for you to assume my political views, you got some nerve when you don't even know me sir or ma'am. I never once said anything in favor or disfavor of anyone but you certainly reply with your attack just because I state that political views left or right are needles and pointless in this site.
      Also btw Dennis never published anything about Credo's political involvement. It was you the one that published what you published. If they are involved in political agendas, I still don't like them because their plans are garbage and nothing else.
      I hope I made myself clear this time.

      Delete
  10. I'm sorry to the last person that posted, but I believe the point was that since this article is about a phone company that is very involved in politics itself, at least in advertisements, so it's not unreasonable to expect politics be brought up in the comments of the article about said phone company.

    YOU might not be interested in it, but that doesn't mean that it is not relevant, because it is.

    (I would argue too that most anything would be relevant, depending on how you view the term "politics". Considering everything effects everything else, there is likely to be some ethical/political issue with most anything. I agree with the person who said you should become a hermit if you want to avoid it.)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Dennis has at different times in different threads said that certain posts are not allowed here mostly those containing religious, political, homophobic, personal insults and the like. As a matter of fact he removed a post in this very thread where the person got aggressive and abusive.
    The problem with these issues is that people have opposing views and are very passionate about their views as you can see not just here but anywhere. Allowing people to state political and other content in the site opens up for many undesirable emotions to be stirred up.
    Being election year, politics is all people seem to talk about so it is virtually impossible to not hear about it so any little bit of peace away from that is welcome here.
    I understand that the one person was talking about Credos political inclinations but if you notice, it wasn't Dennis the one who brought it up, it was that particular individual in hopes to open up a political based discussion. Now, I'm not saying his views are right or wrong, they are his views just like we all have our personal opinions. What I didn't want to see is that conversation turn into a political one where people are getting upset saying I'm right you are not etc. I believe that is why Dennis stepped in deleting some of the comments that started getting aggravating to some of the readers who have a different opinion and even some who don't . That is the type of sentiments that these topics bring out because they are highly personal and dear to them.
    As a consumer Credos service doesn't appeal to me because the plans are not right for what I'm willing to pay for service regardless of them having a political agenda or not. Their plans are basically useless to me or as another reader would put it, in the trash they go. Should cellular providers have a political attachment they push? I would not agree with that but the person who started the political discussion went on as to speak negatively about people who hold a certain political inclination. I would have simply said that Credos seems to have a political agenda and I I don't agree with that but using that information to point out towards a group of people in a negative way I think that is where the line was crossed.
    Just my humble and respectful opinion. Have a great night.

    ReplyDelete
Comment Page :