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T-Mobile's $70 ONE Plan Unlimited Everything (Except Usable Hotspot or High Quality Video) Coming to Prepaid

T-Mobile ONE Logo
T-Mobile USA annouced Uncarrier 12 today. It's a new postpaid plan called T-Mobile ONE that is supposed to eventually replace all of the carrier's other general purpose postpaid phone plans. T-Mobile ONE will be offered to postpaid customers starting Sept 6 and will be available to prepaid customers "later".

T-Mobile ONE is pretty simple. It includes unlimited talk, messaging and data in the US, Canada and Mexico for $70 per month plus the usual long list of postpaid fees and taxes. It also includes Simple Global which is unlimited messaging, 2G data and 20¢/minute voice in over 140 countries. As with current T-Mobile unlimited plans, customers using more than 26GB in a month will have their data de-prioritized, meaning they may experience slower speeds in locations where the network is heavily loaded.

Additional lines on the same account get a discount. The second line is $50 per month and the third through eight line are $20 month. Additional lines beyond eight are $30/month. Tablets can be added for $20 per month, smartwatches are $5/month extra for 2G data.

T-Mobile's current unlimited everything plan is $95/month for the first line and $45 for each additional line. That makes $70/month for unlimited everything sound great, but there are some gotchas. Compared with T-Mobile's current plans, T-Mobile is missing two big things:


  • High quality video. All video streams are limited to 480p. High speed video is available for $25 per month per line.
  • Usable Hotspot speeds: Unlimited hotspot is available but it's throttled to 2G which is unusable for normal PC use or video streaming. Unthrottled hotspot is $15 per 5 GB extra.
T-Mobile ONE essentially means the end of Binge On, Music Freedom and Data Stash. It also raises the minimum cost of a single line postpaid smartphone plan from $50 to $70 per month. I have a feeling these changes are not going to sit well with T-Mobile's Uncarrier fans. Current customers are grandfathered. Some will undoubtedly choose T-Mobile ONE but I suspect many, especially those who use hotspot and/or have opt-ed out of Binge ON, will stay with their current plans.

On the prepaid side, I doubt that T-Mobile will try to replace all prepaid plans with T-Mobile ONE. My guess is that it will replace the $50, $60, $80 and $95 Prepaid Simple Choice plans, which are most like the postpaid Simple Choice plans that T-Mobile ONE is supposed to replace. I'm suspect that the $40, $50 and $60 Simply Prepaid plans along with the $25, $30 and Pay As Yo Go plans will be retained to provide T-Mobile branded choices to potential customers who balk at paying $70/month.

Update 5:30 PM PT: The tech press' reaction to the idea that T-Mobile ONE would replace all the Simple Choice plans has been almost universally negative. It looks like T-Mobile has abandoned that idea. T-Mobile CMO Andrew Sherrard told PCMag's Sascha Segan this afternoon that T-Mobile ONE will only replace the $95/month plan, at least for now.

Source: T-Mobile via FierceWireless

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82 comments:

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  1. Really bad. I think this is the end of T-mobile growth. Not much incentive to switch if you're forced into a higher plan. Unless you have multiple lines this is not interesting. Adding the fact that, yes truly, this the end to many popular programs: free hotspot, bingeon and music freedom and data stash.
    Binge on was becoming too good to be true since last addition of Youtube. Bingeon included Unlimited Hotspot tethering to any compatible device. This is not good news unless you have a lot of phones and really need unlimited data on all of them

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    1. I think that when it is time for me to get a new phone, I am going to look into Cricket or maybe Total Wireless.

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    2. Cricket is so worth it

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    3. go with Cricket, not Total Wireless. TW is horrible.

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  2. The uncarrier seems to have followed suite this time by copying Sprint. Yes into traditonal carriers moves. Note that sprint announcement starts tomorrow but tmobile was not ready to announce theirs and will have to wait september 6th.

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  3. I hope T-Mobile doesn't cancel MetroPCS' 60.00 Unlimited plan or make any changes to it. I'm happy with this plan.

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  4. OK this is what's going to put T-Mobile back on the dump list. These plan changes will ultimately make T-Mobile just like the other three carriers money seeking money grabbing big business

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Is T-Mobile in business to make money?

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    2. Yes. And customers are in the business of optimizing the utility of their marginal expenditures.

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    3. T-Mobils is just a money-grubbing business with poor coverage .

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  5. I fail to see how this is even remotely in the consumer's best interest. I'm staying prepaid all of the way.

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  6. Just look at almost every MVNO under TMo and their prices cannot be beat, unless if you go with pure talk and text, then AVW, Ezgo, and Boom mo seem to have some competition, and also cricket's $70 plan is a great option.

    But in general, it just seemed to be that tmo was the king of what they offered for the price that they offered. particularly with bingeon and especially when adding youtube, then the data usage was unheard of(granted that some said that bingeon limited youtube to 480p, but that can still be about 20 gigs worth on its own, plus all the other 26 gigs that they give before prioritizing).

    So then, the question is, how long can they last with their cash flow before their generosity bites them. Businesses are usually for profit, and even non-for-profit make profit but use it for the growth of the business and not to fill the pockets.(businesses should be self-sufficient)

    So how long could tmo have lasted.

    So either the costs are catching up.
    or they have such a huge subscription base now that they can afford such tactics.

    But if they make their prices more in line with the other carriers, then now what is the push for the other carriers to bring down their prices or to give more?

    Its a very interesting time now for the world of cellular service in the US.

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  7. Tmo 1plan? No thanks, their CS gets very incompetent when closing your account.

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  8. Before you all get your underwear in the knot, read the Updates:

    UPDATE: Here’s a statement from T-Mobile COO Mike Sievert regarding T-Mo’s current Simple Choice plans:

    “We’ll begin to phase them out right away on Sept. 6 when T-Mobile One launches. We haven’t announced an end date for each of the plans, there will be a time period while we get our customers and our team transitioned, but we will begin phasing Simple Choice out on Sept. 6 when this plan launches. And some of the plans will remain for a short time thereafter.”

    UPDATE 2: T-Mobile CMO Andrew Sherrard says that the 2GB/$50 and 6GB/$65 Simple Choice plans will stick around and that T-Mobile One will only be replacing the current $95 unlimited plan. “We’ll still have the rest of the Simple Choice lineup, you can still go buy that $50 plan,”
    -credit to Fierce, as usual

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Maybe Update 3: We've decided that T-Mobile 1 does not address our customer's needs?????

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    2. re: UPDATE 2
      If this is the case, it's going to calm down a BUNCH of pissed off people!

      S

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    3. unbelivable...they did not see this negativity coming. Everything is JL video make it sound the will be THE plan. Good they have just realized how stupid that is.

      Delete
  9. They had better not mess with my MetroPCS Unlimited 4G LTE for 60.00 per month.

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    Replies
    1. Ouch, I'm sure that'll change everything.lol

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  10. So T-Mobile was breaking net neutrality...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, the Binge On censorship/throttle scam is definitely illegal.

      But the weak justification for TMO lawbreaking vanishes entirely with unlimited plans.

      Delete
  11. Why would you need any of those services like music freedom in an unlimited data plan, am I understanding this correctly?

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    1. What if I don't want unlimited plan.

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    2. Too bad. They need more revenue from you to subsidize the data hogs. Allowing disciplined consumers to "sip" data at more affordable rates is no longer feasible.

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    3. Using the data you pay for is not "hogging", and it is "disciplined". In fact, if pay for unlimited data, it is irresponsible and undisciplined NOT to use it to the max.

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    4. The only thing that should be "sipped" is wine. Data should be chugged.

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    5. Answering specifically about Music Freedom--it did not count towards the deprioritization cap. So if you got throttled after 26GB, your music streaming would go on unaffected.

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  12. Boost has new plans coming tomorrow also.

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    1. I'm using the new plan. It's fantastic. :)

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    2. I'm using the new plan. It's fantastic. :)

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    3. Stop trying to make Boost happen, it's not going to happen...lol...

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    4. Lol it happened for me and I'm 100% satisfied because it works perfectly where I live. And the double post was a mistake. Lol

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    5. Boost might be good as a landline replacement for you, but it's not good as a mobile option. Because once you get away from your house where it works you will find that Sprint coverage is extremely poor.

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    6. I didn't mean just in my house..I meant in my area that I live in. And I've never had any problems traveling, either. But, what's good for me and others isn't going to be for other people, and vice versa..that's why we have carrier choices.

      Delete
  13. I have decided today that T-Mobile will join Sprint to my list of companies to never try. I'm currently with TPO (t-mobile) but as soon as my month is over, I'm moving to Verizon MVNO's or AT&T MVNO's. I'm done with T-Mobile and Sprint for good and not because of this last announcement.

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    1. They both have shitty networks so I don't understand all the uproar...

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    2. You'll find it's like night and day when you go from T-Mobile to AT&T or Verizon. The coverage and the networks are hugely better. You really don't have to worry much about your phone not working wherever you go anymore.

      It may cost more, but you get what you pay for. Even in the last business quarter, four times as many customers choose AT&T and Verizon as they did T-Mobile. Because they wanted a network that actually delivers.

      Delete
    3. "Even in the last business quarter, four times as many customers choose AT&T and Verizon as they did T-Mobile"
      I agree. After doing my research I decided that I may go with boom mobile. They seem to have the best plan for me. Plus I read really good reviews about them.

      Delete
    4. Four times as may customers did not "choose" AT&T or Verizon than T-Mobile last quarter. While it's true that Verizon and AT&T combined have more than four times as many customers at T-Mobile, relatively few of those customers actually made a decision to join Verizon or AT&T last quarter.
      In the last quarter, Q2, 2016:
      T-Mobile gained 1.88 million new customers. These are the customers actually choose T-Mobile last quarter.
      AT&T gained 1.36 million
      Verizon added 0.585 million
      Sprint added 0.375 million
      More customers who actually choose a new carrier last quarter choose T-Mobile than any other carrier.

      It's a lot of work for someone to switch carriers and there are usually financial barriers like a contract or EIP to pay off or the need for a new phone as well. Investors are far more interested in a business' growth than its size.

      Delete
  14. Has anyone investigated to see if the 4G infastructure can or cannot handle all mobile units running 4g at the same time?

    If they can, then this is all about making more money, which is a good thing since in our American capatalistic system, it is about promoting businesses that are able to be more lucrative, albeit without harm to the public(as seen by all the anti-trust laws).

    And if the infastructure cannot, then this makes logistical sense.

    But, but, I just guess that people may be upset since Tmo gave so much and is taking it away. What if their data allotment had always been lower than what they give now and their prices were ALWAYS higher? Would people be upset then? If yes, then I am not sure why you would be upset with tmo over the other carrier, and if not, then that is what we have now, tmo is making their prices similar to the other carriers.

    If I told you that I will give you 8 months of free service and then at the end of the 8 months stoped the service as per my original intent, there would indeed be no outcry.

    This is all business, tmo is looking to make a buck, we are all looking to make a buck.

    We cannot be upset at people who go and legally and correctly, without public harm, conduct their business.

    But still people may get upset, even though something that is in no way within their rights to demand is taken away.

    So I ask this.

    Are we upset with tmo because they are being dishonest, being mean, being harmful to the public, or are we upset with tmo because now we need to pay more, even though that low price was never something that we ever had the ability to demand?

    Thank you for your time.

    ReplyDelete
  15. From PC Mag.

    ...spoke to T-Mobile CTO Neville Ray and CMO Andrew Sherrard today to get things clear.

    Is T-Mobile getting rid of all of its other plans?

    No. This was the most confusing part of this morning's announcement. T-Mobile's $50 2GB plan and $65 6GB plan will still exist, Sherrard said, although he reserved the right to yank them "over time" and "eventually." The only real immediate change is that the $70 T-Mobile One plan is replacing the previous $95 unlimited plan.

    "We'll still have the rest of the Simple Choice lineup, you can still go buy that $50 plan," Sherrard said.

    The Simple Choice plans will still be better deals for people who don't use a lot of data, especially because they have rollover data that accumulates from month to month. They'll also be better deals for people who tether their phone to a PC.

    S

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  16. Why would we need special app privelages when there is unlimited data???

    this has surely gone through millions of people's minds.

    Its basic that unlimited is a term that is used for marketing that means "within reasonable limits".

    Unlimited minutes is not a full month's use, so businesses will not find their home here.

    Unlimited texts are also not unlimited.

    There are carriers or companies that specialize in giving out business cell lines, these may indeed be unlimited.

    Maybe we can use google voice with the "unlimited data", that may give us the unlimited talk that we want. with google voice it might be about 28-30 GB per month of full talking. This amount is not too much over the 22-26 GB that the carriers consider proper before they slow down your high speed data.

    But I digress.

    Unlimited is indeed not unlimited.

    Nothing is unlimited. not the air, or the oceans, or our resources. data banks store as much as someone has built the facilities. Google has built custom storage sites for the TBs of videos that youtube consumes.

    So basically, if the carrier allows a certain service to not be counted towards our data allotment, then that is like(tell me if my analogy is correct) pre tax money, you get to use it, and also consider it as if you never made it.

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  17. Trying to limit video streaming to 480p or charge extra for unthrottled video is pointless. People will figure out a way to "download" video instead of "streaming" it. The video download will appear as data rather than video and avoid the throttle. On an unlimited plan you can just download as much video as you want. This could also be used as a way to get around the hotspot/tethering restriction by downloading the video and then transferring the file to another device including a PC.

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    1. Go check the research that some (university?) did with T-Mobile service. They use "deep packet inspection" to see what sort of data is being transferred. Even if you name the file "Not A Video.Zip", they can still tell the file is H.264 + AAC in an MP4 container, and will throttle it. Amazing.

      Delete
    2. Actually EFF did the research: https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2016/01/eff-confirms-t-mobiles-bingeon-optimization-just-throttling-applies

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    3. If T-Mobile is throttling file downloads, even if they are video files, T-Mobile is in violation of net neutrality laws.

      There's a big difference between zero-rating select data/video/music (Bing On and Music Freedom) sources and throttling a specific type of data. If T-Mobile is allowed to get away with this there'll be nothing stopping your home broadband provider from doing the same. Imagine if your home ISP throttled your connection every time you downloaded a video file.

      It looks like T-Mobile is trying to see how far they can push net neutrality laws and get away with it.

      Delete
  18. Has anyone actually used more than 25GB on one of T-Mobile's or MetroPCS' unlimited plans and figured out what being de-prioritized really does?

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    1. You're throlled period. But only in certain places, certain cells towers and at certain time where they have sensed a high demand from other people. Like forget it when in rush hours around high traffic locations

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    2. A lot of people have, and posted their speed test results. They were getting speeds in the range of 0.01-0.1mbps down. They make sure you know you're getting throttled.

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  19. This plan is the dumbest uncarrier ever. How did they go from the best uncarrier ever in January with BingeOn to this? Why anyone would voluntarily sign up for a plan that charges extra for tethering is beyond me. I had thought that the logical next uncarrier was eliminating the retarded treatment of tethering as anything other than using the data connection you're paying for, but instead they go the complete opposite direction and become even worse than the other carriers.

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  20. Deprioritization, throttling hotspot connections, charging more for 720p video and $3/GB are all deal breakers.

    For $70 plus taxes and fees, I expect a completely unrestricted, unthrottled connection that offers hotspot data at $1/GB.

    This is just a stunt to milk their cash cows, except they backed off when the cows threw a shit fit and threatened to stampede.

    Instead, they'll slowly slip the plan in while the cows are distracted, and by the time the cows realize what's happened they'll already be stuck with a different, more expensive plan.

    The irony is that for all the hate directed at the duopoly, it's Sprint and T-mo who are trying to avoid competing by just outright fucking over their customers.

    But hey, what do I care.

    I'm a member of the Cricket Fun Club, so I don't have to worry about T-mo or Sprint declaring war on the very revenue streams that sustain them.

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    Replies
    1. I would actually even consider Cricket with their annoying throttle and service interruptions before considering T-Mobile and Sprint.

      Delete
  21. Check this out Dennis Boost Mobile new plans:
    newsroom.boostmobile.com/press-release/sprint-launches-unlimited-freedom-two-lines-unlimited-talk-text-and-data-just-100–-all

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    1. I'll be curious about a MetroPCS response to this. Although, I won't give up my truly unlimited 4G LTE at Metro unless forced to.

      Delete
  22. They should call it the "none" plan because no one will use it. If Tmo wants to marked a 1.5 mbps unlimited plan, It needs to allow tethering, and be offered at $30 per month or less.

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  23. See I don't use any more than one gig a month so an unlimited plan to me is not enough to draw me to Sprint or T-mobile MVNO's

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  24. You're better off with Cricket $70. No hotspot, but at least you get to stream HD video. I Like the part about how customers can get HD video for an additional $25; thus, paying the same $95 a month that t mobile charges for unlimited service now.

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    Replies
    1. I have Boost's new equivalent plan that optimizes to 480p. Videos look just as good. To me, at least. Saving $10 a month is worth it and to still get hotspot as well.

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    2. It's not even the same because currently $95 also gets you 14GB of hotspot data. Under the new plan, you'll have to pay $30 for 15GB of hotspot. And don't forget the $5 auto-pay fee! Lol

      Delete
  25. Boost Mobile just announced new starter plans that include a $50 unlimited data with similar tmobile unlimited data restrictions and they also added a starter $30 1gb data to match metropcs $30 1gb plan

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  26. 'm not a fan of Sprint or Boost but Boost's new $50 unlimited LTE plan beats everything else out there. Unlike Cricket, its not throttled at 8Mbps. Unlike T-Mobile and Cricket, it includes 8GB of hotspot data (so does MetroPCS) Additional unlimited lines only cost $30 each. That's two unlimited lines for only $80 or three lines for $110 which is less than the price of just two lines on T-Mobile ($120 + postpaid taxes or $70 x 2 on prepaid (no 2nd line discount on prepaid) = $140) and the same price you would pay for only two lines on MetroPCS ($55 x 2 = $110) on a side note, now that all Boost plans includes free hotspot and 50 voice minutes of roaming, I don't see the point of the more expensive Sprint Prepaid brand. Also, all Boost plans now include unlimited music streaming (zero-rated music streaming) so I don't see the point of the Virgin Mobile brand either.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. (Typo corrections. Please replace my first post with this one minus this note)

      I'm not a fan of Sprint or Boost but Boost's new $50 unlimited LTE plan beats everything else out there. Unlike Cricket, its not throttled at 8Mbps. Unlike T-Mobile and Cricket, it includes 8GB of hotspot data (so does MetroPCS) Additional unlimited lines only cost $30 each. That's two unlimited lines for only $80 or three lines for $110 which is less than the price of just two lines on T-Mobile ($120 + postpaid taxes or $70 x 2 on prepaid (no 2nd line discount on prepaid) = $140) and the same price you would pay for only two lines on MetroPCS ($55 x 2 = $110) on a side note, now that all Boost plans include free hotspot and 50 voice minutes of roaming, I don't see the point of the more expensive Sprint Prepaid brand. Also, all Boost plans now include unlimited music streaming (zero-rated music streaming) so I don't see the point of the Virgin Mobile brand either.

      Delete
  27. T-Mobile and MetroPCS "de-prioritize" your "unlimited" data after 25GB. Boost does the same after 23GB. Does anyone know when/if Cricket de-prioritizes data on their unlimited plan?

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    Replies
    1. They don't deprioritize per se, because from the first bit they throttle you to 8mbps LTE/4mbps 4G.

      Delete
  28. Prepaid unlimited data plan comparison

    Cricket $65 with auto-pay. Family plan discounts available. AT&T network.
    All data is throttled at 8Mbps but video streaming is unthrottled. Offers better coverage than any other prepaid unlimited plan. No hotspot data. GSM BYOP supported.

    MetroPCS $60. $5 per line family plan discount available. T-Mobile network.
    Unthrottled data and video streaming (Data Maximizer video throttle available but only useful on hotspot data). 8GB of hotspot data included. GSM BYOP supported.

    Boost $50. Additional lines $30 each. Sprint network.
    Data is unthrottled but all video and music streaming is throttled. 8GB of hotspot data included. BYOP is not supported. Boost phones are aggressively priced.

    T-Mobile $70. No family plan available on prepaid.
    All video streaming is throttled. Offers the same coverage as MetroPCS. No high-speed hotspot data included. High-speed hotspot data costs an additional $15 for 5GB. GSM BYOP supported.

    Overall, T-Mobile's offering doesn't seem very competitive. Not really sure what they're trying to accomplish with this plan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 5 lines on a Cricket group plan cost $50 on average.

      5 lines on Boost cost about $34 each.

      With high prices and low coverage, Metro isn't even in the running.

      Delete
  29. The pricing others have posted when comparing these unlimited prepaid data plans are not correct. For example all Cricket plans include all fees and Boost does not. A $70 Cricket plan with the $5 deduction for auto pay is exactly $65 per month. The $50 Boost unlimted is $50 + $3-$6 for sales taxes

    ReplyDelete
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    1. MetroPCS also includes all taxes and fees in their plan prices.

      On the other hand Boost, T-Mobile Prepaid, AT&T GoPhone and Verizon Prepaid all charge taxes on top of their plan prices.

      Delete
  30. You have to pay $25 to get 720p or higher video?? You have to pay $15 to get a usable hotspot?? Why why ??
    With a network doesn't even work in restroom, what are they thinking??
    So surprising. Cricket wireless for a long long long time, lol

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And with much weaker coverage, in half of the US ("lower 48") you can't even use T-Mobile at all even if you stand outside the bathroom and use a tree... territory well covered by Cricket.

      Delete
  31. Let's not continue to bash tmobile. Tmobile has been great. There
    s always an end to free stuff. Tmobile is also in the business to make money. Yes this plan won't work for those who do not need unlimited and those who have only one phone. But it's a great plan for people with multiple phones and devices and want unlimited internet access on all the phones. And in this tmobile plan is unique. You want get it anywhere else. Sprint offering is not comparable. Here you can connect all your devices at fraction. The plan is revolutionary in its way. It won't work for all. But I'm sure they will tweak it. The main concept is out. Going unlimited for all devices. Myself I was on the fence earlier. An unlimited tablet plan for $20, that's a first. With most people now owning more than one device this concept is the future.

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    1. I would like that plan if T-Mobile was a reliable network in my neck of the woods so none of their "revolutionary" promotions matter to me.

      Delete
    2. "Yes this plan won't work for those who do not need unlimited and those who have only one phone. But it's a great plan for people with multiple phones and devices and want unlimited internet access on all the phones."

      If we aren't talking about multiple lines of service but devices, this plan is for people who have ONE phone and no other devices--not even a TV for unlimited tethering that came with Binge On. It's going to cost them another $30 to get ~the same amount of data they would get for tethering on the current UDP. And why pay $20 for unlimited tablet data when you can tether 14GB off a current unlimited plan for nothing extra?

      Delete
  32. Yeah, woods guy. All the un-carrier-ness won't matter if you can't even get one bar of signal.

    I applaud, however. T-Mobile's expanded, new efforts to put in towers where they have never had them before (instead of just upgrading existing 2g towers to LTE which ignores T-Mobile's worst problem: lack of geographic signal coverage)

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    Replies
    1. "Woods guy"
      Agree with you on everything except the guy part. I'm a 22 year old female. We also like our phone stuff, you know?

      Delete
    2. "Agree with you on everything except the guy part. I'm a 22 year old female. We also like our phone stuff, you know?"

      Really?

      In a world where women never look up from their phones, I never would've guessed women like phone stuff, too.

      Amazing.

      Delete
    3. Well next time try something other than "guy"... Unless you know exactly who you are talking to...

      Delete
  33. Just came across a good article breaking down the numbers based on people's choices with the new plan. Very analysis.

    http://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/t-mobile-one-vs-simple-choice/

    ReplyDelete
  34. So..in order to get full hd and usable hotspot you have to pay $110 a month? I wonder how many people will be leaving T mobile?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Many will leave T-Mobile if they want great coverage.

      Delete
    2. Like I did today.

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