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iPhone 7 and 7 Plus Coming to Boost Mobile, Virgin Mobile and MetroPCS

iPhone-7
Apple has began accepting pre-orders for both the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus, the two latest flagship smartphones the company has to offer. Since this early morning, people have been registering to pre-order either device through Apple's website or one of your preferred carrier. Prior to today's pre-order event, a number of postpaid carriers in the US have already announced some of their iPhone 7 offers; such as Sprint, Verizon, T-Mobile, Sprint, and US Cellular. Following this, their MVNO and prepaid counterparts have also announced availability of the latest Apple products.

The iPhone 7 sports a 4.7-inch IPS LCD display with a resolution of 750x1334 pixels while the iPhone 7 Plus has a 5.5-inch IPS LCD display with 1080x1920 resolution. Both devices run on 64-bit Quad-Core Apple A10 Fusion chipset with the latest iOS 10 software. The memory on the two devices are the same-- 32/128/256 GB with the RAM differing at 2GB for the iPhone 7 and 3GB for the iPhone 7 Plus. Both have the same camera megapixel configuration: 7-megapixel for the front camera and 12-megapixel for the back with 4K video recording. The larger iPhone 7 Plus, however, comes with dual camera on the back for better low-light images. New for this iPhone iteration is the IP67 certification on both devices for water and dust resistance. Apple has also gotten away with the 3.5mm headphone jack in lieu of lightning headphones. They have also added a Jet Black option instead of the usual color selection consisting of Black, Silver, Gold, and Rose Gold.

For individuals who are not interested in a contract subscription, there are other ways you can get the iPhone 7. The list includes Virgin Mobile, Boost Mobile (both Sprint MVNOs), and MetroPCS (T-Mobile MVNO). Both Virgin Mobile and Boost Mobile will accept pre-orders starting on Friday, September 23. Meanwhile, MetroPCS has not announced when they will start accepting pre-orders. There's also no mention on how much the price of the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus will be on either MVNOs. At full retail, however, the iPhone 7 costs $649 (32GB model), $749 (128GB model), and $849 (256GB model). The iPhone 7 Plus costs $769 (32GB model), $869 (128GB model), and $969 (256GB model).

Make sure to check on the website of your preferred carrier to get more updates on pricing and availability of either iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus.


Source: Sprint, MetroPCS

19 comments:

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  1. iPhone 7: The smartphone with courage! LOL.

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    1. The iPhone 8 might be a sales smash due to the decision to add in a standard audio output, currently missing on the iPhone 7. This will enable anyone to use the most common audio devices on the phone.

      Apple will pat itself on the back for its bold innovation, and fanboys will rejoice.

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    2. Lol...you are bad that was funny. I've had iPhones but I'm a versatile guy...I go back and forth.

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  2. Apple sales appear to be going flat so apparently will let the prepaid market have the same flagship phone choice? But will they do it with the next version of upgraded with enough innovation to create excitement?
    More seem to realizing they don't need to be up sold every year with a new model of slightly improved specs.

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  3. Basically the time to upgrade is when the phone is starting to show age like not keeping a charge. ;)

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    1. its a wasteful approach. I get the tradeoffs of removable batteries, but my dollars vote FOR removable batteries. I kept the original google G2 for long enough that the micro usb finally failed completely. Not worth repairing, but easy and cheap to buy a fresh battery and simple external wall charger and kept it in service for another 6 mos till I found a replacement. vote with your dollars.

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  4. This phone is lacking band 66 (T-Mo) so I guess for T-Mobile and AT&T LTE reception it will be the same as the 6S. The addition of the new features is not enough to draw me to it. I think i'll wait for the 7S when it comes out next year.

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    1. True, but as far as I know there are no phones that support band 66 and T-Mobile hasn't activated any of it's band 66 spectrum yet.

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    2. From Fiercewireless.com on that...

      "Prior to Apple’s iPhone 7 announcement, T-Mobile US said it expects to begin rolling out wireless services using its AWS-3 spectrum licenses as early as the end of this year, according to comments by company management to financial analysts at Jefferies"

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  5. So the new fadPhone finally dropped.

    Apple must be rolling in cuckbux.

    Still, why even bother making powerhouses anymore?

    All they'd need to do is discontinue OS upgrades for older devices, and then keep specs down to mid-range tier.

    The Cult of Apple would still eat the new devices up.

    That, and Apple would rake in a lot more dough (or at least save a ton on manufacturing costs) if they just stopped pretending people actually bought their phones for the hardware.

    I mean, what can this iPhone even do as a daily driver that a mid-range Android can't?

    You know, aside from broadcasting wealth, making it less safe for you to walk outside at night, and possibly getting you mugged/killed the same way strolling around in the wrong neighborhood with a diamond encrusted jacket would.

    Or is that the point?

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  6. I read on fierce wireless that the Sprint iPhone 7 will be capable of reaching speeds of up to 200mbps due to some new simultaneous three channel technology.
    If only Sprint had the right coverage now....

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    1. So what?

      Carriers HATE data usage, oftentimes throttling and capping it whenever you use what they consider "too much."

      Some services throttle certain things from the get go, like Cricket, Boost and Binge.

      Some even advertise uncapped and unthrottled data, but still throttle anyway once you hit 20 or so GB.

      The only thing those 200mbps speeds really matter for are large downloads like the kind of HD streaming via hotspotting that carriers can't stop screaming their heads off about.

      And the faster a phone's top speed, the sooner it hits those limits, and the more of a waste it is when carriers start whining about how unlimited data doesn't mean unlimited data because of some fine print embedded in a wall of legalese which nobody actually reads.

      Of course, that's before you account for the coverage itself, which might not top 50mbps where you live, eat and work.

      All those factors make anything above 42mbps HSPA+ a joke, since carriers constantly claim they don't have the bandwidth needed to make full speed LTE a reality for the average consumer.

      Anyway, if anyone thinks a phone's great because it wins a theoretical and largely pointless pissing contest, then it just goes to show how little the uninitiated know.

      If they weren't so blinded by the shiny, they'd realize what the mobile industry really thinks about people who burn through 90GB an hour at 200mbps.

      And no, that's not a typo.

      It's what just a single hour of 200mbps burns through, which means that no carrier in America will allow you to use this phone to its fullest potential for even an hour without your account getting a round of dirty looks at best and a suspension for "abuse" and "stealing data" at worst.

      With that being the case, that theoretical 200mbps is more of a detriment than a feature.

      I'd be a lot more interested in the carriers achieving average nationwide speeds of at least 100mbps, with hefty data buckets to match.

      Unless that happens, all the theoretical speed in the world won't make carriers offer the kind of service needed to make good use of it.

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    2. Wow, the OP Sarah W. was just stating a curious fact about the long awaited-not by me- iPhone 7. You went on to rant about whatever you ranted about. Did you have your daily Starbucks? Or is this your usual happy self? Talk about shooting the messenger man...lol

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    3. Yeah, all pretty silly. I've been with a several carriers and if any of them hated me using the data I paid for, they kept it well secret.

      I suppose deep down inside those who run Chinese buffets also want you to just eat a single egg roll, but so what.

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    4. Anonymous, that's not the way the telecoms or commmunication gurus think about carrier aggregation. You don't use more but less. It makes it easier for others on the network because you get what you need and then get off loading the network down. Plus no one would seriously use 90gbs a hour unless they're downloading torrents or trying to use their phone for CERN or some other scientific research which would be stupid because they'd probably want a gig per second rather than just 200 megs. Which would mean the use fiber optics most likely.

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  7. What "certain things" are throttled in Cricket from the get go? Other than the usual 8 or 9 Mbps down?

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    1. In Cricket's case, those certain things are "everything."

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    2. I get that. Chalk it up to poor wording by the earlier commenter.

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  8. I have a Virgin 6 and 6S. I sold the 6 back in Dec 2015 on Ebay to get the 6S. I am not getting the IPHONE 7. I am not impressed with the elimination of the headphone jack. This is new technology that will just make consumers buy more overpriced accessories. I plan to keep my 6S with Virgin for the next two years. Plus, whatever happened to wireless charging? That would have been cool.

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