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Sprint: Aiming to be a Top 2 Network in Two Years’ Time

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Marcelo Claure, the chief executive officer of Sprint, spoke at the 25th Goldman Sachs Communacopia conference held in New York today, and discussed an ongoing five-year plan that aims to make Sprint the number 1 or number 2 network in the United States by the end of 2017 or early 2018. Right now, the wireless carrier is already a couple of years into its five-year plan, which should not only make Sprint profitable again, but also bring significant improvements in terms of the quality of its network. So far, Claure has expressed confidence that the plan is going accordingly.

Claure also shared that important parts of the overall plan included cost-cutting efforts, strategic network deployment, and continued expansion of the mobile operator’s spectrum portfolio. While the company’s ongoing cost-cutting plans have taken $3.5 billion out of its operations since last year, the Sprint CEO has claimed that the wireless carrier is starting to show some real growth, while at the same time, achieving some critical improvements in network performance.

With regards to network performance enhancements, Claure credits densification as the key for Sprint, not only in improving the quality overall, but also in laying the foundation for 5G. Without divulging details, he also hinted that Sprint has taken full advantage of a combination of wireless and fiber backhaul in rolling out tens of thousands of small cells on public utility poles. Moreover, Claure stated that the company has also deployed macro cells, femto cells, and a mixture of various structures.

Claure believes that Sprint’s competitive advantage lies in how it is deploying its network. In this talk, he pointed out that while rival carriers are spending billions of dollars in boosting their network infrastructure, Sprint is taking a more tactical approach that is quicker and more cost-effective.


Source: RCRWireless

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39 comments:

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  1. Go Sprint..I'm rooting for you!

    ReplyDelete
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    1. I root for better memory usage, complete removal of bloatware, and other reasons.

      But not for Sprint!

      Delete
  2. I'm about to give Sprint up because where I live my Sprint phone would rather hang onto a crappy lte band than switch to an excellent one, about 95% of the time.

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  3. It all sounds like re-arranging deck chairs on the Titanic.

    Throw it in the trash.

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    1. Every time I see "throw it in the trash" comment, I throw it in the trash. It's getting old.

      Delete
    2. Thank you Anonymous @7:08pm!

      Delete
    3. I see the comment "Anonymous September 21, 2016 at 7:42 PM" and throw this too in the trash.

      Delete
  4. Marcelo is all talk and no action. Proof is in the real-world experience. A very large portion of Sprint's network is still 3G only. Sprint hasn't deployed any VoLTE at all. The core voice network is still CDMA which Verizon is phasing out very soon. The vast majority of their coverage comes from roaming agreements (Verizon, nTelos, USCC, etc.). They still have the worst support for devices that customer actually want. Their plans aren't much cheaper than competitors. Unlimited data is their only gimmick and you can't even use it outside of the city.

    Sprint will be lucky if they're solvent in 2 years, they owe BILLIONS over the next 10 years. What network spending is what creditors are asking right now because they want to be paid.

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    1. Agreed.

      Sprint needs to be competitive NOW, with expansive native VoLTE coverage and shuttered legacy 2G/3G networks.

      And with the move to pure LTE, they can become a sim-and-band based carrier that doesn't expect manufacturers to include a separate CDMA radio.

      After that, manufacturers of cheap unlocked multi-carrier GSM devices (like Blu) could incorporate Sprint's bands into their products and start advertising them as Sprint compatible.

      Of course, low prices and a lack of ESN restrictions are a must if they truly hope to steal customers away.

      But given their lack of money, resolve and urgency, it's far more likely that they'll eventually file for bankruptcy.

      It's actually amazing, since Verizon's been all but broadcasting the strategy for running a successful CDMA carrier.

      All Sprint ever had to do was...well, exactly what they were doing.

      Delete
    2. I wouldn't say they have the worst support for devices. They have most of the big phones people actually want. Verizon gets some exclusives that are then GSM only now looking at Motorola.

      The biggest problem I think is there's not a single SIM card from them that works on every phone. You have to do an ESN swap just to get it to work. Verizon doesn't have this issue why does Sprint?

      Delete

  5. the perpetual "five year plan." I saw this back in 2002 with "vision" and it's just the same old empty pledge. it'll never be the "NOW NETWORK," only the "SOMEDAY NETWORK." maybe. and the backwardness of alimentatiing customers otherwise to boot, and nasty locked down hardware they sell? jeez, the suspense of how long this will all last is exciting.

    Comment as:

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  6. I had zero coverage on Sprint while visiting Alaska earlier this year, but generally experience excellent data speeds and voice calls at home in the Northeast. I do notice the high variation as I travel through the tristate, but I have 4G on Sprint at least 97% of the time.

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    1. Like there is any other coverage in Alaska... Or gas stations, stores, bathrooms, etc. It is mostly wilderness with nothing around for hundreds of miles.

      Delete
  7. Sprint owns more spectrum than any carrier but they refuse to build it out. The FCC should impose a deadline or Sprint should forfeit their spectrum.

    Marcelo is misleading. Sprint has slashed network upgrades in a desperate effort for short term profits.

    In truth Sprint is a regional carrier and should not be allowed to deceive customers with advertising claiming they have a nationwide network.

    Sprint continues to mismanage their prepaid brands with high prices, poor customer service, inadequate data and insane device restrictions.

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    1. Why is Sprint still alive today? Do they offer something that the competition doesn't or what?

      Since they're nationwide coverage stinks compared to AT&T and Verizon, I'd never consider them.

      Delete
    2. "
      In truth Sprint is a regional carrier and should not be allowed to deceive customers with advertising claiming they have a nationwide network."

      T-Mobile is better, but not by a lot.

      I suppose technically a carrier could have a tower in Seattle, and one in Orlando, and call itself "nationwide". And if your Sprint plan has Verizon voice roaming, there's more of a claim of covering the nation at least in one way. But we really shouldn't be getting into government censoring anyone like this.

      Buy my own standard I guess I wouldn't call something "nationwide" if it has poor coverage in most states. Sprint definitely does not meet this standard. T-Mobile is getting better.

      Delete
    3. They offer the illusion of "choice" and "competition" (same plans, same prices as everyone else), it's yet another company for "utility deadbeats" to get a line of credit from, they help maintain the artificial scarcity of spectrum / keep prices up for other operators, etc.

      Delete
  8. "Sprint the number 1 or number 2 network in the United States by the end of 2017"

    Lol, just LOL!!!

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    1. Sprint is "Number 2" alright.

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    2. Sprint will be the number 1 or number 2 network by 2018 because Verizon or AT&T will buy them out and move Sprint customers onto a real mobile network. Honestly, I think Sprint knows it's over that's why they aren't even planning to roll out VoLTE while every other network is already rolling it out. This statement is just to mislead their investors. Sprint is done and no one will miss them.

      Delete
  9. Enter your comment...They'll be lucky to be number three again...Legere and Tmobile are kicking them all over the block, even Verizon and Att feel it and the last place network wants to be #1 or 2? I'm all for dreams but anything and everything connected to Sprint is always a nightmare...lol

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  10. Enter your comment...They'll be lucky to be number three again...Legere and Tmobile are kicking them all over the block, even Verizon and Att feel it and the last place network wants to be #1 or 2? I'm all for dreams but anything and everything connected to Sprint is always a nightmare...lol

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  11. Goals are good to have. That said, they're going to have a long way to go to catch up with T-Mobile. Even then Sprint still has to get out of its own way.

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  12. Tmobile will be obsorbed by comcast within next 2 years, Sprint is too big to be bought by anybody since they are owned by softbank now and softbank is rich due to alibaba money. Since tmobile has new owners they are actually changing, I know its hard for you people to see, but just look at how competitive there pricing has become, At our boost mobile stores we sell all the newest phones, iPhone 7 6s 6s plus etc... galaxy s7 s6 note 4 etc... Plus we now can use any unlocked iphone on our network. Also most sprint phone after galaxy s4 can be used on our network. PHones that can be used are s6 s5 s4 note 3 note 4 and now note 5 are allowed from sprint on boost mobile, And the whole coverage thing is a silly point, WE get free roaming on all other networks 50 minutes a month, And how often does america really travel, not much, 99% of the time we are all stuck in our day to day lives. With unlimited data coming in at $45 a month with auto bill pay. Use sprint coverage map and if you get good coverage where you live, you should really give sprint / boost a try again.

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    1. Don't be misleading... It's very doubtful that your CDMA phones roam voice on T-Mobile and AT&T which are both GSM.

      And you never mentioned data. This is 2016, not 1996... Data is important now. And Boost's poor native network means you only have data access in a small part of the country. Much wirse than other carriers: a bad fourth place.

      And if Sprint has data "where you live", you are still hosed if you leave the house.

      If data is important to your mobile experience, you won't choose Boost. Of course the company that has the worst coverage where Americans live, work, and play will call coverage "silly".

      But coverage is king: without it your unlimited plan can't be used at all. Americans are quite mobile. Boost will work for some shut-ins. The rest of us will need a real mobile network.

      Delete
    2. Sprint isn't the bottom of the barrel without reason.... sure they're fine for anyone in a metro area....

      Delete
  13. I plan on being rich and famous within the next 2 years too.

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  14. Mediatek is making chipsets that could soon be used on all 4 carriers. This means lots more budget devices, which could be good for Sprint or at least RingPlus lol:
    http://www.pcmag.com/news/347881/lg-mediatek-break-qualcomms-hold-on-sprint-with-lg-x-power

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  15. I thought he made this statement last year?! I guess hos plan must not be working according to plan?

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    1. It has as much validity as the covers of those old Popular Mechanics issues. You know, the ones proclaiming that everyone will have a personal helicopter. Or the skies of the future will be filled with new Zeppelins.

      Or Blackberry proclaiming that they will dominate again, as they keep cranking out ridiculous terrible phones that anyone looking at them for one minute would throw in the trash.

      If you believe this and similar hype, I will sell you my cuecat.

      That shill-speak from the Boost guy here actually made things seem worse. If Sprint is actually flush with money from SoftBank, and they are doing as badly as they are, they have no incentive at all to strive to improve. Their network will continue to shrink, and they will continue to alienate customers, and they will be bailed out.

      There is a use for Sprint, it's a Fisher Price Network. A toy. Not good for anything serious. That is how I treat my ringplus phone which is on the Sprint network.

      You would have to do as I used to do: when you travel with the Sprint phone as your daily driver, make sure to have an AT&T phone for emergencies. Because unlike the AT&T Go phone, the Sprint phone will only work here and there.

      Delete
    2. "make sure to have an AT&T phone for emergencies"

      Or you could just use a Cricket device as your daily driver, and spare yourself the trouble of carrying around a glorified brick.

      As a point of fact, I got better data speeds than an LTE Hydro Vibe on a skimpy, 3G-only Verizon Stardust.

      That's just how shitty Sprint's LTE coverage really is.

      As long as they depend on roaming for the majority of their coverage, they'll remain a literal non-presence in the prepaid market until the day they declare bankruptcy.

      Delete
  16. Mediatek's quality control is poor. Their processors are unreliable, slow and inefficient. Intel's departure leaves Qualcomm as the only serious processor manufacturer.

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    1. Do you have any quantifiable evidence to support your claims that Mediatek SOCs are unreliable and inefficient?

      As for slowness, Mediatek's current models generally outperform equivalently priced Qualcomm SOCs on CPU benchmarks like Geekbench 3 and AnTuTu.

      Delete
  17. I guess the way to be competitive is price and coverage. What happen they shut down 2G and 3G and operates LTE coverage only (it means voice call uses VoLTE). Also delete creepy policies!!

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    1. "Also delete creepy policies!!"

      We've reached the point where "creepy" is a vague, meaningless adjective that sheds no light on what someone actually means.

      Thanks for robbing the word of all meaning, millennials.

      I have no idea what creepy policies are, or how policies can be considered creepy except in the context of invasive privacy violations the likes of which all corporations now utilize.

      I mean, when you think about it, a carrier doesn't actually need to know your name.

      All they really need is a prepaid debit card number (for paying the bills) and the address of a PO Box so they can mail out your phone/sim/etc.

      In that sense, our identity and verification obsessed culture is what's truly creepy.

      Or does Sprint do something creepier than the rest, aside from shamelessly lying to investors?

      Delete
    2. Are you from Sprint?

      Delete
    3. Uh, not being "creepy" doesn't mean Sprint's "good".

      It just means kids these days fail at basic language understanding.

      Delete
  18. The only way this would be possible is if Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile merged.

    ReplyDelete
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