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T-Mobile: Less Than 1 Percent of Subscribers Deactivated Binge On

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According to Neville Ray, the senior vice president and chief technical officer of T-Mobile, less than eight-tenths of 1 percent of T-Mobile’s subscribers have turned off Binge On ever since the feature debuted in November of last year. Ray also took the opportunity to reveal that he has received calls from more than a dozen international wireless carriers, all inquiring about T-Mobile’s video content streaming service and how the company manages video consumption among its customers.

When the Binge On service first came out, it had generated some buzz in light of the fact that it does not affect the data allowances of T-Mobile customers, but it does bring down the quality of video streams to 480p quality (from 720p resolution or higher). Ray is also claiming that because Binge On optimizes the video resolution to a more manageable 480p, T-Mobile actually was able to decrease the overall volume of data on its network.

The top executive pointed out that the wireless carrier’s network data traffic has been reduced by 13 to 15 percent, which is an improvement over the 10 percent decrease that T-Mobile initially registered during Binge On’s debut around ten months ago. Without going into specifics, Ray was quick to stress the impact of the 13 to 15 percent reduction in network data traffic. As claimed by the executive, T-Mobile currently handles double the volume of video streams compared to its rival networks.

But with the recent launch of its new T-Mobile One unlimited data plans, some are wondering if T-Mobile is looking to eventually shift away from Binge On. The wireless carrier will obviously try to make T-Mobile One as the top priority from now on, and if new customers sign up for the new unlimited data plans, basically they will no longer be needing the Binge On feature anymore because the T-Mobile One plan would render all data (whether it be video content or not) toll-free.


Source: Fierce Wireless

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31 comments:

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  1. But even with T-Mobile One/One Plus video is degraded to 480p.

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    1. I feel that 480p is fine for phones. Netflix throttled AT&T and Verizon customers to 360p for a couple years and no one even noticed.

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    2. Jeff, try watching a sporting event and you'll quickly realize that 480p is NOT fine for phones.

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  2. That's why Binge On was defaulted for everyone, so the least amount of people opt-out of it. Of course they will spin it another way. But the goal was to save themselves bandwidth, and with the ONE to make more money too.

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    1. And it works out fine for both sides. The vast majority of customers think it's great. New T-Mobile customers keep rolling in from Larry, Moe, and Curly.

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    2. @Anonymous replier--when you say "the vast majority of customers think it's great," you're assuming the vast majority of customers understand what Binge On is, or even know how to turn it off.

      If the program was opt-in, do you really think 99% of the people would have turned it on? TMO didn't, that's why they initially made it opt-out and then took away the option with the ONE plan.

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  3. What T-Mobile didn't say is what percentage of people who left Binge-On enabled (the 99%) actually used the service. I am sure it is a lot less than 99%. There many on no-data plans with TMO who cannot turn off Binge On. So, is the 99% only those who can disable the service, or the total universe where it was deployed. Numbers can lie.

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  4. Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy reference ...

    99% do not go into the basement to read what is in a locked file cabinet in a room with "Beware of Leopard" on the door.

    ------

    "Binge-On" is a censorship scam of dubious legality. T-Mobile should not be proud of it.

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    1. That's a bit generous.

      I'm sure more than 1% would be stupid enough to forget they didn't even have the key, which would make the entire thing a fool's errand.

      With Binge On, you can still adjust video quality to a cozy 720p AND get zero rated data.

      It's a win-win, hoss.

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    2. "Binge-On" is a lose lose. T-Mobile punishes and rewards you for viewing data based on whether or not it likes the company providing it... An outlawed practice.

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    3. How do you "adjust video quality to a cozy 720p?" Binge On limits you to 480p...

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    4. Someone help me out. How is T-Mobile and binge on any different than a cable company and its basic cable package. Basic cable(or T-Mobile) offers specific channels(or streaming partners) for a set price. If you want to view channels(or streaming channels) different than what is included in the basic package(or included in binge on) you have to pay extra(or count data against your plan). Someone please explain the difference.

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    5. The cable TV analogy is entirely inappropriate. Compare T-Mobile "Binge-On" to cable internet, then it is pretty close.

      The law prohibits cell carriers from micromanaging what customers do with the data they have bought.


      Carriers sell data. It is a crime for them to instead sell specific web sites. As it should be: let the consumers choose the sites.

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    6. TQ--the cable package provider is not an ISP when providing TV service. T-Mobile is an ISP.

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    7. " T-Mobile is an ISP. "

      Correct. And as such it is not their business what you do with the data you purchase, as long as it is not illegal. That's the law, and a rather sound policy.

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  5. The problem with the TMO plan is that they have to sell it to people who pay as little as $30.

    In other words, they have to lower the price to $30 before the plan will become a viable replacement for your current one.

    The thing is, they don't have the titanium-plated, Nukem-brand cajones to pull the trigger on such a disruptive price cut.

    Because of that, it's really their own lack of testicular fortitude that's sabotaging TMO, otherwise they'd JUST DO IT and move all their customers over.

    And what would people whine about?

    That Tmo gave them unlimited talk, text and data for the same price or less?

    Yeah...no.

    That's about as likely as Tmo competitively pricing their TMO plan.

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  6. That's why I find the law stupid in this case. It may be an ISP, but we are only talking about the video portion. T-Mobile is not blocking access to to news or information. It is downgrading the video quality of videos, only if the consumer wants it. If a customer of this ISP doesnt wish to have this happen, they just turn it off. They are not forced to do anything. T-Mobile is not micromanaging a single thing that a customer does. They sell me 3 GB data, I use 3GB, then they offer me free video from any one of the video content providers who signed up to binge on. One of the most consumer friendly programs I can think of.

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    1. Wrong. TMO is giving you video from companies it likes for free, while it is fining you for watching video from companies it doesn't like, which happens to be the vast majority of video providers.

      It's extremely consumer hostile, and also of course illegal. They are definitely micromanaging and censoring. The law requires that all content providers, video or not, be on an equal footing. And so carriers are specifically prohibited from picking and choosing which content providers you are supposed to consume.

      The law isn't stupid, however that description might be apt for those who are ignorant of it and favor this massive censorship.

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    2. For it to be consumer friendly, it would provide all content, instead of just a few favored video providers, for free.

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    3. To be legal, they have to be indemnified by each video host so they won't be sued for committing acts of "net hostility". Unilateral throttling is the problem.

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  7. From what I understand, a company could ask to be added to binge on. It wasn't just TMOs faves. They are not fining you for a single thing, they are charging the normal way that all of the carriers do, but also adding free video content. If what they do with the non-binge on content is "fining me", then I can assume you consider all data from all other carriers as a fine, not a charge. Because the non-binge on content is charged the same way Verizon or at&t charges all content. Please explain how it is less consumer friendly than Verizon or at&t. I may be stupid, but atleast I can figure out out to comment with a name, and not as "anonymous".

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    1. Mr Dumas said "I love free data as much as the next guy, but it's about time everyone started being honest about how Binge On isn't (and never was) in line with FCC regulations, and how T-mo's knowingly been lying about it this entire time."

      T-Mobile has of course lied about this scam of dubious legality.

      You made very good points. Of course, it can be pointed that the result of letting T-Mobile break the law is a situation where carriers charge you different rates depending on the political content of web pages you visit, for anime vs westerns, for using WhatsApp instead of iMessage etc etc etc...

      All of it illegal, and like Binge-On, none of the cell carrier's business.

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  8. Claim: "From what I understand, a company could ask to be added to binge on. It wasn't just TMOs faves"

    Correction: Only a tiny number of the total number of content providers are allowed in "Binge-On". The process to apply is burdensome, lengthy, and capricious. Besides, since when is it right for a content provider to laboriously petition a common carrier to be carried in a proper fashion?

    Claim: "They are not fining you for a single thing"

    Correction: They are fining you specifically for consuming content they do not approve of. That's a lot of things.

    Claim: "then I can assume you consider all data from all other carriers as a fine, not a charge"

    Correction: Other carriers that follow the law treat data from all providers the same. No punishing/rewarding for choosing the right or wrong content.

    Claim: " Please explain how it is less consumer friendly than Verizon or at&t."

    Correction: Carriers that don't break the law let consumers choose what to do with your data.

    Pointless weaseling: "I may be stupid, but atleast I can figure out out to comment with a name, and not as "anonymous"."

    Comment: Anyone can call themselves TQ. You are no more or less anonymous than anyone.




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    1. Yes you are correct anyone can call themselves TQ, seeing as I didn't post the comment from "TQ" saying "please stop calling me stupid". You were unable to answer my question as to how it is less consumer friendly than aa&t and Verizon. You just said it's illegal, well it's the law we are arguing about so saying not consumer friendly because it's illegal....doesn't really explain anything. You still haven't explained how it is a fine to watch non-binge on content any more than its a fine to watch anything on Verizon. They charge those thing the same way the other companies do. You haven't really answered much....

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    2. It has been explained before. The law-abiding carriers leave the content choice to the user. No punishing and reward based on inconsistent/capricious standards (which all amount to whether or not the cell carrier likes the provider.

      With a friendly, consumer-focused, law-abiding carrier, the customer makes these choices. No ham-handed curation.

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  9. Please stop calling me stupid.

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  10. I'm kind of disappointed Dennis hasn't mentioned T-Mobile one and plus changes.

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    1. Are One and Plus available on prepaid now?

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    2. My bad Dennis, but as far as I can tell.

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  11. Wow, looks like the speech police are really doubling down on policing speech.

    Guess there's no point in commenting anymore.

    Long live the echo chamber, where "The 99%" think Binge On is some sort of drinking contest.

    Wait...it isn't?

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    1. I'm sorry but if you can't discuss issues without resorting to insults, profanity and name calling your comments will be deleted.

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