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Cricket Has Started Sending Warning Messages to Unauthorized Hotspot Users

Creature with Cricket  Boxes
It looks like AT&T's Cricket Wireless has started cracking down on unauthorized hotspot use. Several Cricket customers who user their SIMs in hotspot devices have reported on Howard Forums that they received warning emails or texts from Cricket accusing them of using "unauthorized" devices and asking that they stop. Here's the text of one of the emails;

"Cricket here. Our records indicate you are using an unauthorized device on our network. Our agreement with you states you can only use a basic phone or smartphone with our service plans. See cricketwireless.com/acceptable_use Please discontinue this activity. Call us at 1-800-274-2538 if you have any questions."

The warning doesn't say what will happen to users who continue to violate the hotspot ban. I suspect that Cricket, probably after a second warning, will either block users data or terminate their accounts.

So far, all but one of the Howard Forums users who reported getting warnings have been using stand alone mobile hotspots rather than phones. But one person who uses their phone as a hotspot also got the warning.  Another user who received the warning message is using a hotspot and SIM from business reseller 4G Antenna Shop (4GAS), which until recently was reselling Cricket service specifically for hotspot use!

Cricket's acceptable use policy prohibits the use of its SIMs in anything but a mobile phone and also prohibits using your phone as a hotspot unless you pay an extra $10/month for a hotspot add-on. The add-on is only available for some phones and is not available at all to customers on the $70/month unlimited plan. Cricket blocks hotspot from working without the add-on on Cricket and AT&T phones and many unlocked BYOP phones, including non-jailbroken iPhones.

For anyone wondering why operators care whether their customers use hotspot or not, the reason is economics. Carriers price their plans based on the assumption that some of their customers will not use all their high speed data every month. Hotspots are used to provide a data connection to PCs, set top boxes or smart TVs, all of which consume data at a faster rate than typical smartphone data use. Customers using more of their high speed data cuts into operator profits.

Cricket users have long been able to bypass the $10 hotspot surcharge by using their SIM in a MiFi or other hotspot device or in rooted or jailbroken phones or certain unmodified BYOP phones that allow hotspot use. Until now, Cricket seems to have been ignoring unauthorized hotspot use. I suspect that they were not enforcing the hotspot ban because it appears to violate the FCC's network neutrality order, which requires service providers to treat all legal uses of data equally. It's a virtual certainty that when Republicans get a majority on the FCC next year, the net neutrality rule will be repealed and that seems to have emboldened AT&T to start the crackdown now.

Source: Howard Forums, image Facebook

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101 comments:

Comment Page :
  1. Working harder! Make a fair world!

    ReplyDelete
  2. How many Gigs do you have to use until you get the warning 200, 400 #justasking

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Huh? I thought the terms of service and the article were about any usage, not some sort of level of acceptable usage this below an imaginary high number.

      Delete
  3. It's about time--I'm tired of paying for other peoples bad habits!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wait, you really think a significant number of customers are abusers?

      Are you expecting your rates to go down if these people stop/get booted/leave?

      Delete
    2. The "It's about time--I'm tired of paying for other peoples bad habits!" is a common troll line. I've seen it given with huge vehemence against those who pay for 2.5GB plans and actually use all 2.5GB.

      They consider it a "bad habit" to use what you pay for. Unless these same folks buy a 12-pack, drink one can. and throw the rest away, they are hypocrites.

      Delete
    3. "They consider it a "bad habit" to use what you pay for."

      You're projecting. The complaint was about hotspotters using data they *don't* pay for. Your reply would be legitimate if the previous poster wanted Cricket to throttle hotspot users who used more data than average, or something like that. Instead the poster is happy that Cricket is making noise about enforcing their actual terms of service.

      Delete
  4. Making America Great Again - for big businesses!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Suddenly, it doesn't sound great. :(

      :D

      Delete
    2. Just change the URL of pages and links to replace "www" with "m" and your computer or other tethered device downloads what amounts to a mobile device. You'd still be bending the rules, but you wouldn't consume more data and cut into their profits.

      Does anyone know a way to tell the browser to automatically use "m" for all clicked links?

      Delete
    3. If you want to see mobile formated pages in a desktop browser change the browsers user ahgent string to one from a mobile browser.

      See How to Change Your Browser’s User Agent Without Installing Any Extensions for instructions for Chrome, Firefox, UE, Edge and Safari.

      Delete
  5. Those mobile data hogs

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Those mobile data hogs"

      But they paid for it. Do you call those who buy a 12-pack instead of a single can "beer hogs" ?

      Delete
  6. There is no logic, other than the logic of trollishness, in calling those using data they paid for "hogs".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. haha illegal cricket data hogs

      Delete
    2. Well, if they are using data in a way that is contrary to the ToS they agree to month after month, have they really paid for 'it'? You may think so in a moral/net neutral sense, but I'm speaking legally where the ToS stand unchallenged.

      Delete
    3. United States law is more important than terms of service. And this part of the terms of service is currently illegal under US law.

      Delete
  7. Yes, they have paid for it. because data is data. They have paid for it. And a byte from tether is no different than a byte from Wikipedia or a bye from Netflix.


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Criminal or not it's theft and if you do it you're stealing from other honest customers. I doubt you care about that if you're the one stealing.

      Delete
    2. I don't see how you can call it theft, Cricket's hotspot prohibition is invalid under current FCC rules. Customers have the right to use their data for any legal purpose, including hotspot use. If hotspot use is overloading the AT&T network to the point that users are impacted that's AT&T's fault for overselling their capacity.

      Delete
    3. Per Dennis' comment "Cricket's hotspot prohibition is invalid under current FCC rules." those affected should file a complaint on the FCC website.

      Delete
    4. Anon758, AT&T/Cricket have laid out in their AUP restrictions on usage. As a customer, you have three options:

      1. Challenge the AUP in court/at the FCC.
      2. Make a stink about it enough for AT&T/Cricket to change their policy.
      3. Stop giving them your business and find a carrier more in line with your needs/philosophy.

      Delete
    5. The FCC rules only apply to C Block & those channels in the 700MHZ range so if you do file an FCC complaint make sure you know the rules before you waste your time and that of the FCC.

      Delete
    6. The net neutrality ruling applies to all internet data providers wired or wireless. There are additional restrictions on Verizon's 700 MHz Upper C block spectrum but they are irrelevant to AT&T.

      Delete
    7. "Criminal or not it's theft and if you do it you're stealing from other honest customers. I doubt you care about that if you're the one stealing."

      1) Time to crack open a dictionary. Nothing involved involves anything meeting the definition of "stealing" or "theft".

      2) All those being discussed are honest customers. However, none of this activity negatively impacts whatsoever the sub-group of honest customers you are referring to.

      Delete
    8. The one who refers to "Anon758 said:

      1. Challenge the AUP in court/at the FCC.
      2. Make a stink about it enough for AT&T/Cricket to change their policy.
      3. Stop giving them your business and find a carrier more in line with your needs/philosophy.

      And don't forget:

      4) Use the data any legal way you wish, in the plan you paid for (2.5 GB, 8 GB, unlimited, etc)

      Delete
  8. "haha illegal cricket data hogs"

    If I had a dime for every troll that called it criminal when someone violated a TOS, I might be able to afford a Verizon unlimited plan.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Do anybody know what is the best hotspot device to use with the cricket Sim ?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do not understand their logic for this move. They just started selling Directvnow at Cricket. How do they expect people to get it to their TV?

      Delete
    2. Any ATT hot spot will do,the att Gophone version at best buy for $50 or on ebay for less. the problem is people use it as their home internet(LMAO) using 200 to 400 gigs of data per month. It throws up a red flag to cricket because that number never receives or makes Any phone calls. Safest thing to use is a VERIZON or Tmobile smartphone with the hotspot feature. those work fine and you still use the phone. hope that helps. #teamprepaid #unlimiteddata #unlimitedhotspot

      Delete
  10. I'm writing this now from my tablet while using my smartphone as a hotspot. I will use most of my data this way every month and I don't care about Cricket's policy.

    Signed Verizon Prepaid Customer on the new $50 5GB plan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Verizon Prepaid customer, there is a new Verizon prepaid plan exclusively at walmart. $50/7G of data. $70/12G of data. only at walmart. i was there this past weekend. #teamprepaid

      Delete
    2. The last time Walmart ran a promotion for extra data, I brought a sim card and they refuse to give me the extra data because I was an existing customer. I'll wait for them to offer it for everybody.

      Delete
  11. Thanks for the warning Dennis. I was about to switch my family to Cricket. Although I wouldn't be using my device as a hotspot, I refuse to do business with a company that violates net neutrality. Don't restrict how we use our data.

    Many people feel as we do. I hope ATT is listening.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. AT&T: violates net neutrality.
      Verizon: violates net neutrality.
      T-Mobile: violates net neutrality.
      Sprint: probably violates net neutrality.

      Welcome to America.

      Delete
    2. Welcome to America. Thanks to T-Mobile's "camel's nose under the edge of the tent" quite-illegal censorship scam ("Binge-On"), soon we will be paying varying fees to carriers based on which web site we want to visit, which songs we want to listen to, and which videos we want to watch.


      ... all of this after you grossly overpay the carrier for data (considering that the US has some of the highest cell phone data rates in the world). And, of course, on top of the ordinary and actually expected fees paid to Netflix, New York Times online subscription, and Spotify.

      Trump should have called for jailing Legere, not Hillary.

      Delete
    3. "Trump should have called for jailing Legere, not Hillary."

      You know what's funny? Trump and Legere have had a tiff in the past: http://money.cnn.com/2015/04/12/technology/donald-trump-tmobile/

      Delete
  12. Does anyone know which MVNOs are least restrictive for hotspot users?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Among MVNOs, I think only Ting, Boom, RingPlus (only some plans) and US Mobile allow hotspot at no extra cost. But why limit yourself to MVNOs? Carrier brands T-Mobile, MetroPCS, GoPhone and Verizon Prepaid allow hotspot on most plans.

      Delete
    2. You could just pay Cricket's $10 hot spot fee and then there would be no restrictions other than the data plan limit.

      Delete
  13. If you pay for a byte it shouldn't matter if you transmit that over wifi or to an internal screen. Its just the march of the double charge again. Every company looks at their transit points as toll booths and so that attitude replicates through the financial system. How many times do you pay for the same data before it is considered unethical? Easy solution is to encrypt all your traffic. Then its all data rather than illegal surveillance.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nine: You should know the troll's M.O. by now. If you object to being illegally double-charged (for what you have already paid handsomely for) and are using the data you paid for in a legal fashion, as protected by law, you will be called an "ABUSER!"

      Delete
  14. I don't understand. If Cricket doesn't allow hotspot on their $70/month unlimited plan, how are people popping their sim into a hotspot device & getting 200 GB/month for home use????

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I guess because service doesn't shut off at the SIM level when the SIM goes inside a hotspot device, whose entire purpose is to put out a signal for devices to connect to.

      If you're generating a hotspot off a phone, at least on Android phones with a little bit of work you can make it look like your hotspot usage is on-device usage.

      And this makes me wonder HOW Cricket knows these people are using their unapproved plans for hotspot. Are they going off of just usage or other markers indicative of hotspot?

      Delete
    2. If you use a Verizon or T-Mobile phone with the Hot spot feature Cricket can't detect it for some reason. They can only block you from using the hotspot(on the $70 plan) on a Cricket device. #teamprepaid

      Delete
    3. Carriers can identify hotspot devices by IMEI. A database lookup by IMEI will positively identify a device by make and model.

      iOS lets carriers enable or disable the phone's hotspot remotely. That can be defeated by jailbreaking and installing a non-Apple approved hotspot app.

      Most recent Android phones have the ability to tell the operator if hotspot is being used. There are Android hotspot apps that attempt to hide hotspot use with varying success.

      Not all T-Mobile Android phones will hotspot out of the box on other networks. Ny T-Mobile LG G2 that would not hotspot on GoPhone until I applied a settings.db hack from XDA.

      Delete
  15. What I don't understand is why do people feel so entitled? The now generation I suppose, living in mommy's basement and using their cell for internet access 24 hours a day. No sense getting a job to pay for the data.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The entitlement pejorative quite often applies. But not here. This discussion is about people using their data in ways they are currently legally able to do. The data that they have actually paid for.

      The usual entitlement pejoratives do not apply since the data is actually paid for.

      Delete
  16. If they're "living in mommy's basement and using their cell for internet access," why do they need a mobile network capped at 8mbps? Why not just use WiFi?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's best not to apply logic to these troll ravings. Their tropes will blow away like dandelion seeds on the wind once you apply logic as you have just done.

      Delete
    2. How's the basement working for you? lol

      Delete
    3. So... anyone who uses data they paid for in a tether/hotspot fashion is a basement dweller?

      I'm sure Dennis, the blog host, might be amused to read this, as he uses tether. Of course, he is not one to give much credence to sub-basement dwelling trolls like you.

      Delete
  17. I hope that Cricket Wireless will limit the focus of enforcement this policy to unlimited accounts which is where the abuse really costs them ( out of control data hogs,campers etc).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fine, but the term "Data Hog" really doesn't apply to someone on an unlimited plan. Nor does "abuse", especially concerning this matter (consumers paying for something and using what they pay for)

      Besides, there is really no difference between a wise consumer watching 200GB of Youtube in a month on their registered Cricket phone or watching it on a Mifi tethtered smart TV through Cricket. It "costs" them the same.

      Now, tell me why Cricket should go after someone with an unlimited account who uses 200GB on their phone (of which 200 MB was through laptop tether) and not someone with an unlimited plan who uses just 15GB total, but all on a tethered Mifi?

      It's all data.

      And again, the definition of "Troll" surely must include those moralizers who blubber and wail and point at wise consumers who use what they pay for and shout "ABUSER!"

      Delete
    2. Unlimited does not mean unlimited abuse! Odds are those commenting are not even Cricket customers.

      Delete
    3. "Unlimited does not mean unlimited abuse!"

      No one has described anything like abuse in these comments.

      Delete
    4. Actually, unlimited means "ẅithout limits". If anyone is guilty of abuse, it's the operators for advertising unlimited data, which is something they are neither willing or capable of delivering.

      Delete
    5. Exactly, Dennis. It's really stupid to smear someone as an abuser or thief for doing nothing more than using the service they paid for.

      But I guess I can agree that unlimited does not mean unlimited abuse. Whatever abuse is. It must be pretty awful. I am just guessing. No one has described it on prepaid forums for ages.

      Delete
    6. The abuse is att harassing paying customers with these emails.

      Delete
    7. Maybe Cricket would have (already has?) a leg to stand on if they advertise their unlimited as unlimited ON-DEVICE data, like T-Mobile does (now,) with a device being defined as whatever they want (a phone, for example.) Then, anyone using the UDP on a device they shouldn't be as per Cricket's terms, would be in violation of the AUP.

      Delete
    8. On device? If that means no harassment of those who use the phone as a hot spot, count me in.

      Delete
  18. It's actually quite hilarious how a few of the posters here are trying to justify stealing and even more hilarious is the I paid for unlimited troll.
    I come here just to read the "unlimited wise consumer" whiners comments.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "t's actually quite hilarious how a few of the posters here are trying to justify stealing"

      Not a single comment (nor the parent post, of course) has attempted to justify stealing. Try again, and crack open a dictionary this time.

      It's quite hilarious to see those using the service they paid for get called "thieves".

      I guess these trolls got tired of whining about the "abusers" who use one-tenth of the data the RingPlus plans they paid for.

      Delete
    2. "even more hilarious is the I paid for unlimited troll."

      If someone paid for a plan labelled as unlimited, there is no way they can become a troll by using the data they paid for.

      Delete
    3. "My god people--get a job. I've never seen so many pi*s ants in one forum"

      You must be new to the Internet, young grasshopper...

      Delete
    4. Yeah just wait till this guy stumbles upon one of those 5000-comments-a-day forum posts about Trump's hair. He's in for a shock about how P-any-y the Internet can get.

      Delete
  19. I say it's pretty simple for Cricket. If people are using non approved hotspots and they agreed to those terms then terminate their accounts. DONE and DONE

    ReplyDelete
  20. Their TOS states no tethering. It's not rocket science. It's their call. You want their service, it's their rules.

    And, yes, people, there is a difference between running the same show on Netflix on a phone versus tethering and putting it on a Smart TV. A byte is not a byte here, it's apples to oranges. Streaming on a phone is optimised for mobile, tethering is not. We tested this at work. You use more data tethering and it congests the network more.

    I love all these PC people trying to justify going crazy on data and writing it off as net neutrality. If the carrier says no tethering, it's pretty simple.

    Go congest Sprint's network if you can get it to work for 10 minutes...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Is this apples vs oranges mobile data is not the same as tethering data documented anywhere credibly on the Internet that you can point us to?

      Delete
    2. "It's not rocket science. It's their call. You want their service, it's their rules. "

      It's not their call. Use of mobile data for tethering or hotspot is protected by the law.

      Delete
    3. It's all data. And the use of it is protected whether or not your phone is moving.

      Delete
    4. "Use of mobile data for tethering or hotspot is protected by the law."

      Which law?

      Delete
    5. FCC rules. including the net neutrality rule, are not laws, however companies that operate under FCC licenses, such as mobile operators, can be fined or even have their licenses revoked for violating them.

      Delete
    6. But Dennis, the Wheeler FCC has shown itself to be OK with wholesale impedance of service i.e. slowing all content providers/data consumption services equally. Music Freedom and Binge On are logistical violations, and they're even allowing these. So as long as a carrier blocks/allows hotspot for EVERYTHING, they're OK by the FCC.

      Delete
    7. Trump says he will limit the FCC to granting airwaves licenses. While I favor Net Neutrality, I do think that the FCC's intrusions into actual First Amendment issues needs to be curtailed.

      And the granting of station licenses based on skin color is purely destructive and purely racist. Surely this will end.

      http://www.nytimes.com/1994/06/30/business/fcc-to-reserve-licenses-in-affirmative-action-move.html

      Delete
  21. So the abuse here is violating Cricket's TOS/agreement/whatever that says no hotspotting/tethering allowed?

    @Dennis, do you use Cricket? Have you filed a FCC complaint about this?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So yes, the so-called abuse is not actually abuse at all. Those making claims of abuse in this blog are always crying wolf. On here, and in the ringplus forums.

      Delete
  22. Finally someone with some common sense:
    "Their TOS states no tethering. It's not rocket science. It's their call. You want their service, it's their rules."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ""Their TOS states no tethering. It's not rocket science. It's their call. You want their service, it's their rules."

      "Their rule" is in violation of current FCC rules. So, you want their service, go ahead and use it to the full legal extent. This includes tether/hotspot.

      Delete
  23. Ok, then I don't want their service or any other service from at$t.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Why is hotspot usage in USA a problem ? I mean you already have paid in most plans for your data. Even if mvno do not calculate with them not everybody would use it. In Europe I do not know any provider who do not allow to use tethering.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's one of those things, like the US carriers charging way too much for data (just compare other rates worldwide) and getting away with it.

      It's rather certain, as discussed in other posts, that the new Presidential administration will look the other way even more when it comes to matters like carriers' colluding/price gouging, Net Neutrality lawbreaking, refusing to unlock or let phone numbers go, and other matters.

      Delete
    2. Because wired internet in USA is slow, expensive, and increasingly unavailable. Obama has wasted money on the ACA and solar energy programs but has refused to require Verizon and ATT to upgrade their infrastructure; all the while giving net neutrality only lip service. We have yet to see if Trump will make things better or worse.

      Delete
  25. Always amusing watching posters actually engage with obvious trolls. Good show! My opinion: tethering has been a built in android function from the beginning. Carrirs started charging for it because they could, but i never thought that was fair. How you use your data is your business alone. If theres a problem with people using too much unlimited data, cap the data. Simple. If a carrier feels the "unlimited" label is more valuable for marketing, well, thats their gamble. Im aginst paying extra to turn a built in android function back on after a carrier has disabled it, just the same as im aginst sim locks, bootloader locks, root locks, and proprietary software. But everyone is entitled to their own opinions!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "How you use your data is your business alone."

      I point my finger at you and bellow "ABUSER!""

      Delete
  26. Let's be civil rather than bellow. If two customers visit a buffet restaurant one eats two plates the other eats five. They both got what they paid for.

    A cell company shouldn't be allowed to market their plans as unlimited if they aren't.

    Those claiming TOS violations ignore the fact many Cricket custumers joined before the tethering restrictions went into place.
    New customers shouldn't be expected to wade through tens of thousands of legalese to get cell service. It's unreasonable to expect and the courts shouldn't enforce it

    ReplyDelete
  27. Would use of a VPN permit tethering?

    ReplyDelete
  28. My question is why am I receiving this message when I purchased my at&t jet pack I took it to cricket to have it activated and only use 115 GB a month if it was a problem or not in the acceptable use policy why did they activate it and program it for me.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I'm in the process of trying to switch to Verizon's newer plan. Basically it is like 20 or 22GB of data, a hotspot with home support, and a couple of cell phones for I think around $171 or so with tax, or at least that is the theory. In practice my new phones and such were shipped in yesterday and are currently unavailable for purchase due to an invoicing issue. I'm not sure I believe that. Hopefully they are in tomorrow though.

    I'm still not sure if I should not have just stayed with cricket for the cell phones and used T-Mobile for the hotspot. It would have been no contract, though I might have needed something like a weBoost external amplifier and even then it was uncertain. Simply put out where the access is needed in this case, Verizon and AT&T towers are the safe bets.

    DSL would have been nice, or anything like that, but AT&T never expanded any of its networks, not even a little bit.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, Verizon's the best. but you need to pay more.

      Cricket is a compromise, not as good, but I find it acceptable as I don't want to pay triple what I pay now in order to get somewhat better Verizon coverage along with hotspot rights.

      "I'm still not sure if I should not have just stayed with cricket for the cell phones and used T-Mobile for the hotspot"

      I have Cricket for the cell phones, and RingPlus for the hot spot. I paid very little for 1GB a month, tether allowed on RP. Sprint coverage is pretty bad, but T-Mobile is only a little better.

      "DSL would have been nice, or anything like that, but AT&T never expanded any of its networks, not even a little bit."

      IT seems like for decades I have been getting AT&T DSL ads in the mail, but they won't run the DSL service to me. A big waste of ad dollars. AT&T also advertises regular "DirecTV", but that is also a waste. I live in an area that gets some rainfall every year, so satellite TV is a no-go.

      Delete
  30. I've had Cricket first awhile nowith and have been paying for unlimited data for around 6 months. I never went over 3gb a month. Now I'm using 250gb a month on Cricket with my phone. I pay for it,i use my data how I please. And it's not stealing if you pay for it. Also Cricket data speed is capped at 9mb. So it's not that great anyway

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "And it's not stealing if you pay for it."

      That's wise. The use of the word "stealing" and "theft" in discussions of modern tech issues (and especially copyright) more often than not happen entirely without meaning. There's no way anything can be called stealing data from Cricket unless someone does something like not pay at all and hack to get 2GB a month, or pay for 5GB and do something to get 15GB.

      Now, would you mind telling me how you rack up so much data? Not that there is anything wrong with it: you have paid for as much data as you can use (maximum 10mbps every second for the entire month). I have the same plan. and so far seem to hover around 50GB !

      Delete
  31. Okay so i just got a line suspended for hotspot usage on cricket. I racked up close to 1TB before they shut it off. I was going to cancel the line anyways. I used to travel a lot for my job and had to work in pretty remote areas with no wifi available.
    But what I want everyone to remember is that while aguing over the definition of unlimited and datahog and if its illegal or not and You people who are saying that you're paying for my usage need to remember that cricket and anyother carrier will only raise rates anyway even if people like me use a lot of data. If everyone used a little data or a lot, they dont care. Prices for services will either stay the dame for a shot while then they go up. Its just a fact. The only way they drop prices is if there is a price war between carrier. And they dont drop prics they just add more shit you dont neef to an already overpriced package. Trust me i overpaid for verizon for yearrrrs. So i used a Tb. Against a TOS. Not illeagaly. No cops were called. No lawsuit brought against me. Just suspended service. GET OVER IT!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Exactly!

      No one is paying for your data other than you. and you are using no more than what you pay for.

      Of course it is not a crime, but countless trolls will insist that any violation of a TOS is a criminal offense.

      An argument which of course means that any doofus in a company's legal department with pretentions of having a law degree can sit down and crank out legislation and post it on the Terms section of a web site....

      "So i used a Tb"

      A terabyte is a mere fraction of what you would have used if you had used what you had paid for fully: data use every second of every month at the maximum data rate of the provider.

      Delete
  32. Also, I am a happy Cricket user, but not a fanboy. And I am a realist.

    The hotspot policy "sucks". Banning hotspot makes as much sense as banning video, or Wikipedia pages. And it is... or was.... actually illegal to ban such usage.

    But you can't fight city hall. As boneheaded as their policy is, I can't do anything about it. And as much as I wish Cricket would "allow" even 5 GB of hotspot/tether a month, they don't.

    I could hotspot if I wanted on Cricket. But I won't. Not because doing so is immoral or a crime or theft or I would be a "Data Hog"... it is none of these things because none of those is possible from using tether or hotspot.

    But simply because I don't Cricket to cancel my account.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Perhaps modifying something within the browser to replace "www" with "m" for all clicked links would save the day? Now your browser is downloading what would amount to a mobile device.

    ReplyDelete
  34. I hate cricket they always trying to find a way to get some money they charge for every damn thing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hmmm. I had Cricket for a couple of years. I never got charged anything other than my monthly fee. Nothing. Not even an activation charge, or for the sim.

      What WERE you doing?

      Delete
  35. they can push their mifi agenda all they want cricket "at&t" is not getting more money out of me..ill just get a phone strictly for tether and 8 gigs a month at 30$ a month will work for my laptop use...i mean show me a mifi plan that lets you use 8 gigs a month for 30 bucks....>.> ....<.< didnt think so....i am also in country with the only alternative being satellite internet giving me like 12 or so gigs for 60 bucks a month plus equipment cost......so no thanks and if at&t doesnt want us using data off our phone run some damn dsl lines out to my house you cheap punks...dueces

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