Home - , , , - As FCC Greenlights First LTE-U Devices, Verizon and T-Mobile Get Ready To Debut LTE-U Offerings

As FCC Greenlights First LTE-U Devices, Verizon and T-Mobile Get Ready To Debut LTE-U Offerings

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Ajit Pai, Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), has recently announced that the agency has now granted approval to devices that tap into the LTE-U spectrum. This move should help in easing network congestion, specifically by letting devices gain access to the unlicensed parts of the 5 GHz frequency band, which has considerably less traffic.

According to a statement released by the FCC, while the LTE-U devices being certified have completely met the requirements set by the Commission, they do not, however, need to comply with the coexistence plan (LTE-U and Wi-Fi) that is yet to be approved by the agency. As noted by TechCrunch, the certified LTE-U devices include base stations from Nokia and Ericsson that have already been rolled out in the field.

With the FCC’s announcement, major US wireless carriers T-Mobile and Verizon are eager to capitalize. T-Mobile has already released a statement, stating that it is already looking to start deploying LTE-U coverage in its LTE network by spring of this year. Once launched, the carrier’s LTE-U offering should allow its subscribers to take full advantage of 20 MHz of unlicensed spectrum on the 5 GHz band.

As for Verizon Wireless, a spokesperson has stated that the mobile operator will be conducting an initial deployment of LTE-U devices and equipment also this spring. According to Verizon, the introduction of LTE-U will allow its customers to enjoy access to data at faster connection speeds.

Like T-Mobile, Verizon is one of the earlier supporters of LTE-U. As a matter of fact, Verizon joined forces with Alcatel-Lucent, Ericsson, Qualcomm, and Samsung in order to form the LTE-U Forum back in 2014. The objective of the forum was to establish standards on how to let LTE-U coexist with Wi-Fi and other wireless tech.

Source: Fierce Wireless

15 comments:

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  1. If we see that 2.1 GHz wreaks havok with building penetration won't upping it to 5 GHz just almost completelty disallow building penetration?

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    1. I expect LTE-U to be mainly used to increase capacity and speed in urban areas using dense concentrations of small cells on light poles and in large public spaces like malls and sports stadiums. Also possibly with personal cellspots for home use in rural areas. If the transmitter is on a light pole outside your apartment or in your house it will penetrate just fine.

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  2. Wouldn't having a cellular transmitter outside your apartment give you cancer?

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    1. The power levels of small cells are lower. There are rules defining safe distances and maximum power levels.

      Small cells on power poles are already widely deployed in urban areas.

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    2. "Wouldn't having a cellular transmitter outside your apartment give you cancer?"

      Ah, is it junk science day?

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  3. @Dennis
    By urban areas do you mean black areas?

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    1. No, what kind of racist nonsense is that.

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    2. I wondered, so I checked. "Urban" meaning "black" is part of the standard dictionary.

      However, the question is indeed "nonsense", as Dennis was referring very clearly to the crowded nature of urban areas (related the other definition) and not to ethnicity.

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  4. packet collisions with WiFi though to make for longer data latency and audio dropouts or distortion on VoLTE calls?

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    1. No, it will just kill your wifi

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    2. Kill WiFi by means of overpowering it?

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  5. Is the VOLTE-U 5 gjz that much cheaper to set up than tradiditional 850 mhz towers?

    Or is it that once they need to set up towers anyways they would rather set up the towers that offer much higher speed while being very careful to place enough of them and to position them correctly so that the clients will still be able to have acceptable coverage?

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    1. Of course it is 5g o 5MHz is what Wi-Fi uses.

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    2. I don't know if LTE-U deployment is cheaper or not. The LTE-U spectrum is free, licensed spectrum is expensive, but you need many more 5Ghz towers to cover the same area compared with low band spectrum.

      The main appeal of LTE-U is that it's spectrum that's available immediately to add capacity and speed in heavily populated areas where currently deployed spectrum is congested.

      Virtually all the available licensed spectrum in populated areas is already in use, and its capacity is maxed out for some or all carriers in densely populated places like Manhattan or any NFL stadium during a game. LTE-U can add capacity there.

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  6. I think rural small towns can enjoy this also, if they have overhead power line post to supply the rural community energy. This open door for carriers like T-Mobile who does not have a large print in the rural areas and provide the area with coverage. Good for the highways also.

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