Home - , , - New Data Deprioritization Threshold Announced for T-Mobile Prepaid and MetroPCS

New Data Deprioritization Threshold Announced for T-Mobile Prepaid and MetroPCS

t-mobile-data-deprioritization
Just a few months ago, T-Mobile announced that it would be increasing its deprioritization threshold from 28GB to 30GB. Today, the carrier has informed the public that they will be raising its threshold once more.

According to the press release they published earlier, the new deprioritization threshold will be 32GB. What this means is that customers who consume over this new data threshold within a single billing cycle will experience data usage prioritization lower than the carrier's customers throughout the billing cycle.

In layman's terms, what this translates to is that the data speed will be significantly slowed down, in areas where network is congested. But if you would step away from the area with a congested network into one that has less congestion, your data would return to its normal speed. This can also happen when the network congestion in the area you are in becomes less saturated.

Even with T-Mobile's new deprioritization threshold, it still comes higher compared with the other major carriers in the country. As of this writing, Sprint's threshold is at 23GB; AT&T and Verizon have a threshold of 22GB.

The increase in T-Mobile's deprioritization threshold applies to unlimited data plans on both T-Mobile Prepaid and its MetroPCS prepaid brand.


Source: TMONews

32 comments:

Comment Page :
  1. I am a T-Mobile postpaid customer and have not had any problems with the data depriortization.

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    1. I am a new T-Mobile postpaid customer. In my first billing period, I did about 34 gigabytes of data. I did not notice any slow-down once I cruised past 30.

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    2. Addendum: my non-throttled *cough* "deprioritised' TMO data was always around 8 Mbps or so. Slower than Cricket in my area (except for having a much faster ping)

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  2. Whatever threshold they raise it to, multiplied by 0Mbps will always be 0Mbps! It's what ran me off from TMUS. Much love and respect, however, to Legere for bringing King Verizon to its knees.

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    1. You just came to two completely different conclusions.

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    2. This characterization of T-Mobile is literally both old and tired. If you chose to try and utilize T-Mobile in an area where they have no coverage, that's a decision you made. T-Mobile didn't force you to purchase their service.

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    3. It's still relevant. Verizon still gives service to a significant​ly larger portion of the US where people live, work, and play than T-Mobile does.

      T-Mobile coverage, which does not meet the needs of most people, is a very current issue and it's not an "old and tired" one.

      It's a problem when even now there is a huge part of the nation where if you try and utilise T-Mobile, you get no service at all.

      No amount of rah-rah magenta fanboy enthusiasm can change this fact. However T-Mobile has a plan to become a network with good coverage. This is supposed to happen in a few years, even if it's not a current reality.

      You are counting your chickens before they are hatched.

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    4. No, to be fair, T-Mobile's maps tell a false tale. I can prove this as well. Areas where there is "coverage" is either still on 2G or deprioritized on partner roaming, if no coverage at all. Been through parts of the Midwest and T-Mobile is garbage, except Chicago and St. Louis...until you walk into a building. T-Mobile HAS gotten better, but it is still a FAR cry from playing outside a minor-league ballpark. Still not ready for The Show.

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    5. Careful, Corp. Such nuanced and informed comments will get you labelled an "anti-T-Mobile troll".

      As for Chicago, I was there recently and was surprised that T-Mobile could muster only a wan (not WAN) two or three bars.
      --------
      As for the Rah Rah fanboy saying that Legere has brought King Verizon to his knees, when you look at real business performance instead of lame metaphors, Red Goliath is still clubbing the mouthy off-purple David to the ground quarter after quarter after quarter...

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    6. The T-Mobile coverage maps are in full view of anyone that wants to see them. If the coverage doesn't work for you, don't use it. But it does work for enough people that it is a viable business. If it doesn't work for you personally, that doesn't mean it can't work for anyone else. Even saying it doesn't work for most people is an exaggeration.

      Yes they have a smaller native coverage footprint. No one is denying that. This is common knowledge for anyone that looks at their coverage map. That doesn't mean that it isn't capable of being useful for a lot of people.

      In conclusion, this perpetual fight that seems to always happen on this site about who has what coverage is kind of moot. Just use what works for you. It may not work for somebody else.

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    7. "Even saying it doesn't work for most people is an exaggeration."

      It's not an exaggeration at all when you look at the most reliable indicator of what carrier works for customers: what carrier they choose.

      People choose the carriers with extensive coverage twice as much as they choose the second-tier carriers.

      It's easy to see why: the large areas of the US still poorly covered or ignored by T-Mobile still have tens upon tens of millions living in or going there and needing cell coverage.

      Only two carriers at this time meet the needs of the vast majority. I have every confidence that, with its recent spectrum purchase, T-Mobile will join their ranks. But they aren't quite there yet.


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    8. For the last three years in a row, T-Mobile has gained the most new customers of any of the four major carriers. More customers are actively choosing T-Mobile than AT&T, Verizon or Sprint.

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    9. I would prefer not to speculate on the motives for anyone choosing one carrier over another. Coverage where you need it is certainly a factor, but so is price, customer service, whatever deals they might be able to take advantage of, and many other things I can't think of off the top of my head right now.

      My point: we don't know for certain why someone chooses a particular carrier.

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    10. "People choose the carriers with extensive coverage twice as much as they choose the second-tier carriers."
      This is not true, as Dennis points out. People who stay with Vzw and AT&T every month without comparing other major carriers are not even "choosing" to do nothing. They are just operating on inertia (for a variety of reasons). If they actually compared and chose the best overall carrier to meet their needs, a lot of them would go elsewhere.

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    11. Dennis and the "inertia" guy: "Active" is a dubious and vague qualification. But when you look at real numbers and real customer choice, customers still choose Verizon and ATT each twice as much as they choose T-Mobile.

      After all, everyone has a choice.

      The gap has narrowed only a little.

      Things will really shake up once TMO gets good coverage ... But we aren't there yet.

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  3. We use T-Mobile as our sole home internet connection and have never experienced any deprioritization (that we could tell). We probably stream for one or two hours per day, with a Roku tethered to the T-Mobile phone. We have no complaints.

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    1. That is fine while it works, but TMobile could throttle you at any time. Our cable home internet, on the other hand, works very fast all the time and the total cost with two limited (but plenty) data cell phone plans is similar to the cost of two unlimited data cell phone plans.

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    2. I guess we've been on a two year lucky streak. We're grandfathered into an unlimited plan that costs less than $40/mo. It's not only cheaper than the local mom and pop cable company, but it's faster, too. We'll keep riding the wave until something changes.

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    3. "That is fine while it works, but TMobile could throttle you at any time"

      Watch out for the throttle-nazi's who will jump on you for calling the sort of throttling at happens after a certain megabyte limit "throttling" instead of "deprioritising".

      Assuming they aren't ripping each other apart over the definition of MVNO.

      Seems there are lives that need getting.

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    4. How do you use it, tethering from a phone?

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    5. People need to stop using grandfathered plans as a point of discussion. They don't do the rest of us any good and your cost example is only valid for a single phone.

      Most cable internet providers are significantly faster than the typical prepaid MVNO, and have significantly less latency.

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    6. "People need to stop using grandfathered plans as a point of discussion"

      I found Gramps's comments to be more worthwhile than all the usual trolls.

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  4. They are play with numbers.

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    1. ...but with numbers like this, it makes the other carriers look to be just playing us.

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  5. Total wireless$10 data add on cards at Walmart, local one anyways now say 1.5 gigs of data for $10, swore it used to be 3 gigs for $10?
    Zach

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    Replies
    1. Shady Slim strikes again!

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    2. It used to be $10 for 1.5GB a long time ago. Then they changed it to $10 for 3GB. It sounds like your Walmart is still selling some really old cards.

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    3. Thanks, it was even a new store, weird!

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  6. Sprint's network is more congested than T-Mobile's. Comparing unlimited plans from Boost and MetroPCS, people are more likely to be affected by Boost's 23GB threshold than whatever threshold MetroPCS has.

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  7. Hard to believe you wrote a column on this topic, increase from 30 to 32.
    Why didn't you inform readers about the new T-Mobile Digits plan that is arriving on May 31?
    This is a significant development that the other carriers will copy eventually.

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  8. Im sorry, I don't see tmobile's service improvements in the areas I frequent since I left in 2013. Still way behind ma bell and V. Many people I know cannot even communicate from our workplace unless standing in certain areas. Not meaning to be a troll, but facts are facts.

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