Home - , - Wirefly's 2017 Internet Speed Rankings Show T-Mobile is the Fastest Mobile Carrier in the U.S.

Wirefly's 2017 Internet Speed Rankings Show T-Mobile is the Fastest Mobile Carrier in the U.S.

wirefly-mobile-carrier-overall-speed
On Monday, Wirefly unveiled the results of the 2017 Internet Speed Rankings research they compiled together with SourceForge, a leading name when it comes to open source software repository on the web.

The results of the research were obtained from users throughout the country who ran the Wirefly Speed Test on their own smartphone. Wirefly then compiled these results to see which major carrier earned a credible title this year.

When it came to the speed of U.S. carriers, the result showed this:



The result showed that T-Mobile led the other three carriers at a speed of 21.06 Mbps. Verizon came close at a speed of 20.91 Mbps, followed by AT&T at 16.33 Mbps, and finally, Sprint at 14.82 Mbps.

When it came to the fastest mobile download speed, the carriers showed these results:


  • T-Mobile - 22.18 Mbps
  • Verizon Wireless - 21.45 Mbps
  • AT&T - 17.00 Mbps
  • Sprint - 15.76 Mbps

Data from the Wirefly Speed Test showed that T-Mobile has the fastest mobile download speeds as compared to the other major carriers in the country. Again, Verizon Wireless came close at 21.45 Mbps with AT&T and Sprint trailing behind at 17 Mbps and 15.76 Mbps, respectively. 

But when it came to the fastest mobile upload speeds by carrier, this is where things get interesting. The data showed the following result: 

  • Verizon Wireless - 16.06 Mbps
  • T-Mobile - 11.06 Mbps
  • AT&T - 10.23 Mbps
  • Sprint - 6.35 Mbps

Unlike the other two results wherein T-Mobile led the competition and Verizon was only shy of less than 1 Mbps, the tables have turned. Verizon led the other three carriers as the one with the fastest mobile upload speeds of 16.06 Mbps. T-Mobile trailed right behind it but was not close enough to steal the spot at 11.06 Mbps. AT&T remains on third at 10.23 Mbps, and Sprint remains dead last at 6.35 Mbps. 

The Wirefly data also shows that the average mobile download speed in the U.S. is at 19.76 Mbps. The average mobile upload speed is at 12.44 Mbps. 


Source: PhoneDog


Tags: ,

29 comments:

Comment Page :
  1. I am more worried about coverage than speed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Agree, and I am on a Sprint MVNO;the 'slowest' and the 2nd smallest coverage footprint. The only thing that matters is that works for me, where I live, work, and play (vacation);at the best price point for me.

      Can anyone explain what one gains in 'usability' by moving from Sprint's speed to Tmobile's speed?

      Delete
    2. Agreed. Legere is a blowhard. He needs to cover the United States like ATT and Verizon before he touts speed rankings. To be objective, I just left T-Mobile for ATT, and I feel that I am getting more for my money.

      Delete
    3. "Agree, and I am on a Sprint MVNO;the 'slowest' and the 2nd smallest coverage footprint. The only thing that matters is that works for me, where I live, work, and play (vacation);at the best price point for me.

      Can anyone explain what one gains in 'usability' by moving from Sprint's speed to Tmobile's speed"

      You will be able to use your phone in a lot more places. Sprint's network is actually a distant 4th in size. It is bigger than US Cellular, though!

      Delete
  2. Ha! Wonder how much legere paid to have his brand at the top? I regularly see Sprint speeds of at LEAST 17 Mbps down, and 10 up. Of course, my tower is not heavily used which shows how congestion can slow things down. And like the 0 Mbps guy says, slow is better than no service!!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Doesn't matter, as their coverage stinks. That's like Sprint touting speed but they only cover a few large metro's good.

    When Tea Mobile can actually provide coverage, I'll worry about their speeds.

    ReplyDelete
  4. At&t seems like the only one who gets a pass at any weakness in coverage/speed, it gets old, people whine about Verizon who by the way forced at&t to improve coverage and speed, yet they're "evil" for recouping their investment, society is so dumb.

    ReplyDelete
  5. These coverage and speed discussions are interesting, but IMHO it mostly comes down to what works best in terms of data speed and latency in your own home.

    ReplyDelete
  6. T-Mobile has speed
    Verizon has both speed and coverage
    AT&T has near-Verizon coverage with GSM flexibility
    Sprint has nothing, nothing at all

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "T-Mobile has speed
      Verizon has both speed and coverage
      AT&T has near-Verizon coverage with GSM flexibility
      Sprint has nothing, nothing at all"

      You make a good point about "GSM flexibility" Verizon's use of CDMA technology, which is honestly stone-age in the world of mobile, really drags them down.

      Sprint isn't completely without anything, though. They DO have the most dishonest advertisements on TV, with that smirking guy claiming that Sprint is 99% as good as Verizon. That's something to count for them! "We're Number One!"

      Delete
  7. Does anyone knows what is the supposed speed for T-Mobile 3G HSPA?? I am on Ultra Mobile unlimited 3G plan, however I only get EDGE 2G speed on my IPhone 5S which is useless for everything but email.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This happened to me on T-Mobile postpaid tablet plan and needed to upgrade tablet to 4g LTE capable.
      T-Mobile has been converting 3g/4g 1900 frequency to 4G LTE leaving just 2g and 4g LTE. (ATT eliminated 2g in Jan leaving 3g/4g and 4g LTE.)
      I do not know how T-Mobile MNVOs are handing their 3g data plans with this conversion. My guess is that you need to upgrade to 4g LTE equipment or change to non T-Mobile MNVO.
      Check with MNVO. See article here at prepaidphonenews about need to upgrade phone and conversion in 31 cities on home page.

      Delete
    2. I'm not an iPhone user myself but I'm pretty sure the iPhone 5S supports LTE. So you probably don't need a new phone. As long as your phone can connect to LTE, you'll get the maximum data speed your plan offers. Ultra's 3G service doesn't actually limit your connection to T-Mobile's 3G network. They just throttle your data speed to whatever they decide to call "3G". You're still connecting over the LTE network, provided that your phone can connect to LTE. As long as you're in an area with LTE coverage, it doesn't matter what's happened to the 3G network because your phone is connected to the LTE network regardless of your data speed.

      Delete
    3. T-Mobile does not offer data over 2G(EDGE) anymore, Just on HSPA+/LTE, so if you are getting 2G speed on an IPhone 5S, you are probably being throttled down to dial up speed by Ultra. Its a smart move, so they can advertise "UNLIMITED" something and actually giving you nothing.

      Delete
    4. T-Mobile data, in most markets, is available on LTE only.2G and HSPA is for voice and text only. By 2020 there will be no more 2G or HSPA, only LTE and VOLTE. So if Ultra's LTE speed is dial up, you are being "shafted" pardon my French.

      Delete
    5. It was AT&T, not T-Mobile that shut down its 2G network. T-Mobile still offers 2G over all of its 1900 Mhz network footprint. I connected to T-Mobile EDGE in the San Francisco BART subway today.

      Delete
    6. HSPA and HSPA+ data is still available throughout the T-Mobile Network except in 700 MHz LTE markets and few 1900 MHz only markets where only LTE and 2G are available. T-Mobile has not anounced when it will shutdown 2G and 3G.

      Delete
  8. As someone who might need to move about on a moment's notice, I'd still go with Verizon or AT&T for their coverage and reliability in Real America™.

    But if you're a ghetto rat or city slicker who eats, prays and loves the concrete jungle, then T-mobile will usually have coverage wherever you go.

    It's a lifestyle choice, not a race, and speed is secondary to where you'll be using your phone.

    ReplyDelete
  9. T-Mobile: Fast LTE speed in some area, but yet poor coverage indoor and some place + expensive.
    Verizon: Nice LTE speed, good coverage and expensive.
    AT&T: Nice LTE speed, good coverage and they play with LTE speed + expensive.
    Sprint: makes ornament your phone.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Verizon's results are artificially low because they have so much rural coverage where there is no financial incentive to offer faster service."

      Actually, averaging in all geographic points fairly and objectively (including places where Verizon is slow) means that the results are accurate, and not "artificially low".

      Delete
    2. I'd wager they didn't include all the places T-mobile doesn't even have coverage (but others do), so it's not exactly objective.

      Delete
  10. Verizon's results are artificially low because they have so much rural coverage where there is no financial incentive to offer faster service. If you tested Verizon only in urban areas where T-Mobile has coverage, Verizon blows T-Mobile away. T-Mobile has no rural coverage to slow their average down.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's exactly correct. Tea Mobile is useless outside of a large metro/submetro area. Just a mile away in any direction and you can forget it. Doesn't matter which magic band or unicorn pixie dust old LeGere throws around - their network stinks just like Sprint. Verizon has the largest network and it's not even close.

      Delete
    2. I'm outside of a huge Metro area, and T-Mobile covers fine for me thanks to the massive Band 12 expansion. And when it doesn't cover me, I have roaming onto AT&T.

      Nationwide, T-Mobile has 2 or 3 times as much coverage as Sprint does, and this is true in my own experience (with T-Mobile being much faster than Sprint too).

      "Verizon has the largest network and it's not even close."

      That statement, like claiming that the T-Mobile network is like Sprint's, simply isn't true. At this time. AT&T's network size is very close to Verizon's.

      Verizon, of course, has the disadvantage of being stuck on the outdated CDMA network technology... STILL... and the company has brutal, draconian locking policies. The locking policy and CDMA are indeed a disincentive to those who want the coverage Verizon offers.

      Delete
  11. I am in a "rural" area with no wired broadband. Since 2016, all four carriers supply LTE and can be accessed via a tower that relies on microwave back-haul. Based on my experience, primary LTE bands are: Verizon 13?, ATT 2, TMO 4, and Sprint 26. Coverage pecking order is Verizon>ATT>TMO>Spint. Speed and latency pecking order is TMO>ATT>Verizon>Sprint. Affordability pecking order is Sprint>ATT>TMO>Verizon. Not here to make judgement, just trying to increase the database. I would appreciate if other "rural" customers could supply their LTE data experience.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It sounds like you're talking about postpaid.

      On prepaid, speed and coverage are subject to a variety of different factors depending on the carrier, and it's hard to discern an objective comparison if you don't know exactly what specific factors are at play.

      And because conducting a truly objective Trac Test (aka one phone, three sims) is a total hassle, and it's not something you can just look up, that's why anecdotal generalizations are used instead.

      Anyway, based on people's experiences, the commonly accepted pecking order will remain Red > Blue >>> Magenta >>> Yellow, at least until T-mobile finishes their 600mhz buildout to alleviate B12 congestion.

      How many > (from 0 to 2) they shift over to the "Sprint Gap" will ultimately depend on how many dead and congested zones they liven up.

      Only if they have usable extended coverage (of at least 5mbps) on their native network will they get bumped up to 5 degrees above Sprint (and one away from AT&T), at which point they'll have finally attained prepaid relevance.

      Until then, they're not even worth considering unless you carry a backup Trac just in case.

      Most people won't, which is still T-mobile's most immediate problem.


      Delete
    2. IMHO those who rely on wireless as their ISP, regardless of postpaid or prepaid, are in the best position to provide objective information. I encourage others to contribute their experience both objective and otherwise. Gradients are subject to many factors so I limited myself to a single >.

      Delete
    3. Prepaid uses the native network only and this is a prepaid blog, so postpaid and its roaming benefits are wholly irrelevant.

      Delete
Comment Page :


Comments must be approved before they will appear. The following types of comments will not be approved:
- Off topic, comments should be related to the contents of the post.
- Name calling and insults directed at other commenters.
- Racist, sexist, ableist etc. comments.
- Language you shouldn't use in front of other people's children.