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Developing: Cricket May be Starting to Crack Down on Free Hotspot Use


A couple of Cricket customers posted on Reddit that they received texts from Cricket yesterday stating that they had used their phone as a hotspot without paying Cricket's $10 hotspot fee. The texts warned the customers that if their "prohibited" hotspot use continued, their service would be suspended on December 20 and cancelled on Jan 5.

Cricket has always blocked no extra cost hotspot use at the device level on iPhones and most Android devices.  Resourceful users have found ways around the hotspot block by jailbreaking iPhones and installing a Cydia hotspot app, making system modifications or installing tether apps on Android devices, which often requires rooting,  or finding unlocked specific Android phones that Cricket hasn't figured out how to block. Now it looks like Cricket is about to crack down on users who found a way to hotspot in spite of Cricket's blocking.

We don't know what criteria Cricket is using to flag hotspot use. They may be going after all prohibited hotspot use. But it's also possible that they are only after customers use hotspot and also use a lot of data. If you hotspot on Cricket, please leave an anonymous comment indicating whether you got one of these warning texts from Cricket,as well as which plan you are on and how much data you use in a typical month. That will help other users determine if they can get away with light tethering or if even a little hotspot will get them in trouble with Cricket.

I've always felt that operators charging extra to use the data you already paid for with was unfair. Discriminating against or charging extra to use certain applications is also a clear violation of the Net Neutrality principle that holds that all data traffic be treated equally. Current FCC rules require providers to practice Net Neutrality. However the FCC has never really enforced Net Neutrality and is poised to repeal the Net Neutrality rule entirely on December 15. It looks like Cricket isn't wasting any time taking advantage of the demise of Net Neutrality.

If you are using your phone as a hotspot it looks like you have three options, pay Cricket's $10 fee, switch to a different operator that doesn't charge extra or block hotspot use or figure out a way to hide your tethering from Cricket.

For many customers, paying extra for hotspot is not even possible as the option is only available to customers on Cricket's most expensive $55 and $60 plans and only with iPhones and specific Cricket Android phones. The $10 fee also only allows 8 GB of hotspot use per month.

Carriers that don't block or charge extra for hotspot include AT&T Prepaid ($45 plan only), Boom Mobile (iPhones only), PureTalkUSA (only iPhones officially supported) Boost Mobile (specific phones, 8 GB cap on $50 unlimited plan), MintSIM, MetroPCS (except $50 plan, 10 GB cap on $60 unlimited plan), Tello, T-Mobile Prepaid, Verizon Prepaid ($40, $50 and $60 plans only), US Mobile and Ting. This is not an exhaustive list. Some carrier branded Android phones may also require modification to get hotspot working.

Hiding hotspot use is complicated as carriers have many ways of detecting it. Two techniques that carriers have been reported to use are checking the user agent strings that apps and browsers send with every request and looking at the Packet Time To Live (TTL) parameter. Both TTL and User Agent vary between phones, PC's and set-top boxes.

I've never found the need to hide hotspot and don't know much about the process. If you want to try you need to do your own research and experimentation. Some things to look at are tether apps like the Cydia TetherMe app for jailbroken iPhones and  PDANet+ and WiFi Tether Router (root required) for Android claim to be able to hide hotspot use. Using a anonymous VPN and changing the TTL are two techniques that have worked for users to hide hotspot on various operators. I don't use Cricket and don't know if it's possible to completely hide hotspot from them.

Source and image: Reddit

131 comments:

Comment Page :
  1. So, if a user establish a VPN access from their phone, and tether behind the VPN, carriers should never be able to peek into the data packet. Does that make sense?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Almost anything makes sense if you're a thief.

      Delete
    2. No one here is discussing theft. It's clear you commented on the wrong post. Or maybe wrong forum even.

      Delete
    3. "Almost anything makes sense if you're a thief."

      The only thief around here is the one who apparently stole your dictionary. From reading what you type, it appears you are in sore need of one. Should we do a Kickstarter to get you money for one?

      Without it, you are probably the guy who will blame thieves when the milk goes bad in your fridge.

      Delete
    4. OMG! What is the difference between using data with the Youtube app on the phone in 1080p vs. with the Youtube desktop app on a Mac in 1080p? The real thief is the greedy telco.

      Delete
    5. Mac data bytes have 9 bits. The extra bit not found on 8-bit phone data bytes makes a big difference. It's very expensive to provide data with 9-bit bytes. That is why telcos are justified in charging a lot extra for hotspot data.

      Delete
    6. I hope you're being facetious. A byte is 8 bits on any binary based system.

      Delete
    7. "Almost anything makes sense if you're a thief."

      Almost any flaming of a consumer makes sense if you're a corporate apologist.

      Delete
    8. Easy for you to say. You are probably so guilty, keeping buckets of stolen megabytes in your basement. Shame on you!

      Delete
    9. Just had my $60 unlimited line suspended today. Was using a data modem ; customer service said that device violates ToS - ie, apparently only certain devices can be used on Cricket.

      Delete
  2. And then there's Big Slim, who's been sitting in the corner with a smug, shit-eating grin plastered all over his face.

    If you still want the good stuff, you'll eventually have to join The Family.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Never.

      Not one cent from me, family, friends, accounts I admin. will ever go to Slime.

      Delete
  3. I used to understand this policy, but it just seems silly on anything below an unlimited LTE plan, I understand it on unlimited LTE plans though, interestingly other at&t mvnos don't seem to mind, even TracFone/at&t .

    ReplyDelete
  4. Cricket's trying to get rid of the few trouble makers, can't blame them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those trouble makers don't care, problem is quite often the people that obey the rules end up paying higher fees because of the abusers. I say just cut them off completely.

      Delete
    2. "Cricket's trying to get rid of the few trouble makers, can't blame them"

      No one has mentioned any trouble makers until you.

      Delete
  5. Dennis what cell provider do you use? Do you use a VPN?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I use FreedomPop and T-Mobile Prepaid. I have an Android VPN but I only use it on public WiFi, I haven't used it while hotspoting.

      Delete
  6. just dump cricket and go on at&t prepaid if you want to stay on an att service. no workarounds needed. cricket is definitely now only for fools. keep illegally doing hotspot tethering on cricket and you deserve to be found out and cut off.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tethering is not illegal. It violates Cricket's terms but that is not illegal, although it gives Cricket the right to terminate your service.

      Delete
    2. Correct. Tethering is not illegal, nor is it "troublemaking". After all, the data has already been paid for...

      Some people love to say things without thinking a lot about them.

      Delete
    3. If somebody is breaking the rules (TOS) it's not unreasonable to call them a troublemaker. Talking loudly during the movie in a theater is not illegal, but they can kick you out for making trouble. Even if you paid for a ticket.

      Delete
    4. "If somebody is breaking the rules (TOS) it's not unreasonable to call them a troublemaker"

      This only makes sense if the violation of the TOS causes other people problems -- running torrents that saturate the local tower or something like that. An example:

      I'm on Cricket. Yesterday I wanted to read a PDF that was online. My phone screen was too small, so I set up a hotspot and downloaded the PDF on my laptop. My other option was downloading it on the phone then transferring it to the laptop via USB. In either case I'd use exactly the same amount of bandwidth, meaning that my hotspot use affected precisely no one. (Except that it made my life slightly easier, in that the hotspot was easier than fishing around in my bag for my USB cable, so it affected me positively.) Does this make me a troublemaker?

      Delete
    5. oh geez. it's "illegal" under the terms & conditions. but so what. the worst that can happen is you get kicked off cricket with your self-entitled feelings all hurt that your imagined right to tethering under cricket is something you can forever get away with. so sad. too bad. cricket holds all the cards here if you do what is not allowed if you are on cricket. just because you can do it, that doesn't mean you won't get caught. so, port out of cricket asap and go to another provider that actually allows tethering without paying extra. what is horrifying here is you are practically advocating that people break their contracts with cricket to "illegally" tether on cricket without paying extra. but whatever. that's just a typical ornery phone techhead's need to push beyond the limits to cheat the system to get away with getting something without paying the required fee to stay "legal" under cricket.

      just hope cricket doesn't do something stupid like tie up your number by refusing your porting out. not likely. but you never know. anyways get out now.

      oh yeah, net neutrality is myth. particularly now soon to be rubber stamped by the fcc under trump. this extra fee for tethering at cricket was ahead of the game with the tethering fee and this is just a hint of more to come. trump's fcc is stumping on net neutrality and cricket is taking the hint by going after tethering cheaters. so, if you want more on cricket, then pay more. we should all be used to this now by paying more and more for wanting more data. no net neutrality means cricket declares open season on hunting down tethering cheaters.

      Delete
    6. "If somebody is breaking the rules (TOS) it's not unreasonable to call them a troublemaker."

      It's very unreasonable, since there is no connection between using the data you paid for and "troublemaking".

      TOS terms have nothing to do with this.

      Delete
    7. "Does this make me a troublemaker?"

      Of course not. Those who make accusations of "troublemaking" or"theft" have given no regard to the definitions of the words or their applicability.

      Be there they will call those who wisely use the data they paid for "rioters" and "burglars".. that wouldn't make any less sense than the words blurted out already.

      Delete
    8. "...declares open season on hunting down tethering cheaters"

      This will be like a snipe hunt. No one has identified any cheaters or cheating here yet.

      And there is no one "self-entitled". Bring entitled to legal use if data you paid for is not unreasonable. There's no way around it: if you have paid for it, it is due to you.


      "oh geez. it's illegal under the terms & conditions."

      Is it too much to ask for knowledge of the English language here? See what Dennis B. said about illegality and "terms and conditions".

      Ok, here you go, and read closely:
      ----
      A) If an activity is illegal, it is probably against terms-of-service.

      B) if it is against TOS, it is in no way or sense "illegal" UNLESS the activity breaks the law (see "A" above). In fact, most activities found as prohibited in TOS lists are quite legal. This of course includes the use of data you already paid for to read Cicrro online, watching gardening videos, or using this data in a hotspot. Regardless of TOS banning any of this.

      C) Lather, rinse, repeat until you understand. Consult dictionary as necessary. Or call a lawyer.

      "Oh geez" indeed.

      Delete
    9. "what is horrifying here is you are practically advocating that people break their contracts with cricket to "illegally" tether on cricket without paying extra."

      Hmmm? Where are the comments advocating anything illegal ? I looked and there are none. Maybe they are in your own mind ? Or Dennis deleted them ?

      Delete
    10. Can you tell by reading all these replies who is likely the one breaking Crickets rules? " xxxxxx " Always the one that says they are right and everyone else is wrong. Cricket is cracking down and some here are likely the reason.

      Delete
    11. The only ones "wrong" are those making untrue claims that legal data use is somehow illegal or "theft".

      Don't like tethering? Don't do it. Problem solved 100 percent.

      Delete
  7. When I had an iPhone, I would watch many GB on an installed native Netflix app, and simply connect my TV to the phone with a $30 Apple cable (not sure what they called it), which mirrored whatever was playing on my iPhone to the TV. Since I was basically just using another app, Cricket didn't know the difference or didn't care.

    Now that I have switched to Android, I don't know how to do this. Is there a similar cable or other method to mirror whatever is playing thru an app on your phone to your TV?

    Then you could do the heavy streaming thru various apps (eg Netflix, Amazon Prime, Youtube,etc. perfectly legal, and, who knows? a little bit of unauthorized tethering on the side for websites.

    I suspect that Cricket's crackdown is not a morality issue as much as it is a practical effort to limit excessive bandwidth use, kind of akin to their efforts to migrate everyone off of the 8mbps Unlimited plans to the 3mbps (1 1/2mbps video streaming) Unlimited 2 plans.

    BTW, a neighbor got a similar warning note. They called Cricket, and were told, basically, "Don't worry about it." It will be interesting to see if they follow thru on their threat to suspend, and then terminate.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "I suspect that Cricket's crackdown is not a morality issue as much as it is a practical effort to limit excessive bandwidth use"

      The word "excessive" doesn't apply here, either. If a plan is advertised as "unlimited", no amount of data can possibly be excessive.

      Delete
    2. From PPN headlines two days ago: "Updated: Cricket Announces 4 Lines of Unlimited for $100, Starting Tomorrow."

      See that? Unlimited. Words DO mean things. "Unlimited" has a broad scope: from 0 data used to infinity. Any amount of data between those two ends is covered, and is thus not "excessive".

      -----------------

      Now that was have dismissed the inapplicable word "excessive", on to your question. Have you tried basic 'casting? Like Miracast or Chromecast, and the one Samsung has? That is how I send content from my Android phones to the TV.

      IF you don't have a Chromecast-compatible TV or actual Chromecast dongle, I've seen them as low as $20, and that is probably lower than any special cable from Apple!

      Delete
    3. "Anon. @8:04pm"--
      "Excessive" as in exceeding the capacity of their oversold network."

      Delete
    4. "Excessive as in exceeding the capacity of their oversold network."

      Perhaps the only thing excessive is the company overselling?? There really is nothing excessive about a customer paying for and using a service at its advertised capacity, which does specifically say Unlimited.

      Delete
    5. Someone needs to SUE Cricket and all the other companies for false advertisement.

      Delete
    6. Customers can't sue because they agreed to arbitrate disputes. Governments could sue if they thought they can prove false advertising. Courts defined who can sue over false advertising and what constitutes false advertising. Following the Straight Talk case, almost all carriers changed their advertising to avoid these suits. So it's a long shot for private lawyers to sue. Government lawyers don't care because they are using your tax dollars, and some hope for fame to help them run for higher office. They might take a chance. When they lose, they will just claim that "I fought for you!"

      Delete
  8. Unlimited and over the past 4 months ive used 50+ gb and never received a message, 30gb usually being hotspot, one month i used 200gb and still have not got msg ive used 30gb since the 24 and only to the 2nd of the month

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I say horsesh#t, but that's just me.

      Delete
    2. Insane usage... where did you use 200GB?

      Delete
    3. I use that much, does not seem insane. Using more than 1TB is what I would describe as insane.

      Delete
    4. Watching ESPN and other sports stations on your phone for 7 hours a day average equates to 1/2TB or 500GB of data. A baseball game is close to three hours of streaming

      Delete
    5. I give you a pat on the back for using a terabyte of data in one month. Well done!

      But I certainly would never call that excessive, or cheating, or troublemaking, or theft. After all, one terabyte is an extremely tiny part of the infinite data amount that an UNLMITED PLAN specifically promises.

      If you sell me Infinity, by God that is what I am owed specifically. It's certainly not my fault that you advertise something Unlimited.

      Delete
  9. Anon 12/2 @ 6 PM
    Great question!
    I do not want casting "over the air" whether thru wifi or bluetooth.

    Many others silently reading would likely want this information too.

    What cable &/or cable/app combo would allow us to plug our phone into a TV to mirror what is watched on our phone like YouTube without using Chromecast dongles for "over the air" transfer mirroring?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think that not wanting to do this through Wi-Fi or bluetooth is an unreasonable restriction. Are you paranoid about RF radiation cooking your body or something?

      What's so bad about doing it this way, seriously?

      Delete
    2. Yes, exactly. That's what I need--no wifi. Bluetooth from the phone would be OK.

      Delete
    3. You might be better in the long run conquering the phobia than just getting a cable. Just sayin'

      Delete
    4. The cable based standards for sending an HDMI signal from a phone to a TV are MHL and SlimPort. Unfortunately, not many phones support either. A few that do include:

      MHL: Samsung Galaxy Note 4 and Galaxy S3, S4 and S5 See MHL® – Devices for more. You also need an MHL adapter or cable and there are at least two incompatible versions of MHL so you need to be sure you can the version that works with your phone.

      Slimport: Samsung Galaxy S8, LG G4, G5, V20. See SlimPort supported devices. You need a Slimport adapter or cable.

      If the reason you are avoiding WiFi based solutions is to keep from using your phone as a hotspot because of Cricket crackdown, you should consider Miracast. It creates a WiFi Direct ad hoc WiFi connection between the phone and a Miracast capable TV or dongle. Miracast is built into Android 4.2 and later. Using Miracast is not considered tethering. See Miracast: Everything to know about mirroring Android - CNET for more information.

      Delete
    5. Someone recommended (if you bought ChromeCast)
      The Allcast app (use the pro version)
      This youtube video showed it working on 4k TV
      http : // www(.)youtube(.)com /watch?v=t0nG3XHyeuI

      Delete
  10. I believe the ones that are getting those messages are using third party apps for tethering. Some unlocked phones support hotspot on Cricket no matter what. I had an unlocked Galaxy S8 Plus which I used on Cricket's unlimited plan and it worked great. I didn't use it that much so it wasn't an issue for me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What version of Android were you using on your Galaxy S8 Plus?

      Delete
  11. GoSmart Mobile, Consumer Cellular, and Truphone also allow tethering.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For a couple of weeks anyway, ALL carriers allow tethering ability, even if they give you the false statement of telling you that it is not.


      That is what the current law of net neutrality means.

      Regardless of what the terms of service say, it is within the legally protected rights of users to use the data that they paid for in any way seen fit... and actually legal.

      Delete
  12. Thank you, Ajit Pai.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Dennis, typo in headline:
    "Hotspt"

    ReplyDelete
  14. Cricket has been making tons of negative changes over the last few weeks. I wonder if this was all in anticipation of a Sprint/Tmobile merger or NN repeal. Best thing to do at this point is to dump Cricket.

    ReplyDelete
  15. FREEDOM OF THE PRESS, BRAH!

    AT&T CAN CENSOR AND LIMIT THEIR SERVICE HOWEVER THEY WANT!

    IF YOU DON'T LIKE IT, JUST GO MAKE YOUR OWN WEALTHY MULTI-BILLION DOLLAR MOBILE ISP!

    Seriously though, the freedoms that allow Dennis to censor comments agsinst the will of his patrons are the same freedoms that allow AT&T to arbitrarily limit how their own virtual printing press is used.

    Suck it, Dennis Defense League.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I am rooted using a VPN and got the same message with less than 3 GB of tethering.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Dennis @ 12/3, 3pm: GREAT info, thanx! MHL was a dead end with my phone and TV, but it looks like Miracast will be perfect. More anon... Will report.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Same B.S., different day, same people.

    Once again, their ToS states no unpaid tethering. Their paid tethering has a cap. Do you know why? Because people are doing insane things and running their entire array of nerd garbage off their phones.

    I've said this a thousand times here and on other forms: MOST STUFF YOU DO ON MOBILE IS OPTIMIZED FOR MOBILE. Period. Streaming video on most anything else will automatically use more data than on your phone directly. We tested and proved this two years ago when I was still in the business. We tried Netflix, Hulu, Youtube, plus videos inbedded in sites like Facebook...all the same.

    Idiots who tether and run torrents and all this other garbage ruined it for people who don't. Period.

    I can say this because I've been on the other side of a counter and witnessed all kinds of crazy nonsense, stories for years. I've seen data counters in TBs, had a fool show me his 4K videos he livestreams from his phone attached to a drone sent to his channel nobody watches, I could go on and on.

    Entitlement is disgusting, it is all in your head. I have no love for any of the carriers, but I also have no love for people who think they can do whatever they please.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Clearly another version of the "consumers are thieves troll". Much of what you say is simply untrue.

      Quite predictably, you rage against the entitlement of those who pay for something and then expect to be compensated with whatever they paid for. Out of a really strange belief that people should pay for a service and really not use it at all.

      It's clear that you are interested in your own imaginary ravings instead of the facts. The use of the term "nerd garbage" is just further proof of this. If you don't like how some use of the data that they paid for, just don't do it yourself. Problem entirely solved.

      You also mention the TOS, ignoring the fact that any legal use of data purchased takes precedence over the "terms of service" under current law.

      The fact remains, that if a service is advertised as unlimited, any use of a quantity of data between 0 and infinity is supported and paid for.

      And no one is "spoiling" anything by using no more than the amount of data which they paid for it. Your attempt to lay a guilt trip on those who have done nothing wrong entirely fails.

      Though I have never done this myself, a pat on the back on those who have used terabytes of data during a month on unlimited data plans through tethering. Well done!

      Delete
    2. The only "B.S." I see is from someone yet again smearing cell service consumers for daring to use what they paid for, CorpJP.

      Despite your angry biases getting in the way of facts, current law protects the rights of consumers to use the data that they paid for for "nerd garbage", 10 hour Youtube Hyponotoad videos, or downloading PDFs of scans of 1960s agricultural futures records from the Chicago Board of Trade.

      Even though you call those who don't meet your nosy criteria of approved use of the data they paid for "idiots".

      As long as the usage fits within actual law, it's really no business what anyone uses the data they pay for on.

      Your rant about certain types of users using more data than others is entirely subjective, and it is like your anger let you type and submit too fast without even considering your words.

      Those who use the data they pay for in tether sometimes (not always like you imply) use more data than other users. You vent your inconsistent anti-consumer hate, even though it doesn't matter in a plan that sells unlimited data.

      But where is the rage and consumer-hate, CorpJP at those who "spoil" stuff for others watching a few Youtube videos a month, compared to those who look at a few text web pages a month on their data plan?

      After all, those Youtube watchers consume thousands of times as much data as those who merely look at a few web pages!!! Thieves, Thieves!

      It shows how ridiculous it is to bellow with moral outrage in such an inconsistent manner against some data usage and not others. When it is all well within what is paid for, if it is on an unlimited plan.

      (Somehow I imagine you hissing and spitting in a Gollum voice when complain about consumers using what they paid for)

      Delete
    3. Breathe slowly, CorpJP...
      "Same B.S., different day, same people.

      Once again, their ToS states no unpaid tethering"

      That first sentence fits you, CorpJP.

      The TOS has nothing to do with imagined theft,cheating, or claiming entitlement to something someone does not already have.

      The customer has paid for the data, so it is theirs to do whatever they want with. As long as it is legal.

      Sure,it violates TOS sometimes, but it's just a cat and mouse game. Those who get "caught" have lost the game for this round. It is no more immoral to have been "caught" tethering than to have lost a game of checkers.

      Not only that, it's not your business. It doesn't affect you at all. You don't see me obsessing and moralizing over how you use your data, do you? Maybe one say you will be old and wise.

      New years resolution suggestion: live and let live, and don't get your blood pressure up over how others use this data. Relax....

      Relax, CorpJP. Relax...

      Delete
  19. It's not something many people will notice, just like when they added the Network Congestion measures earlier this year. I use around 200-300GB of data through hotspot tethering every month and I have yet to notice slowdowns for using more than 22gb, not have I received this message about "illegal" hotspot activity. I highly doubt Cricket actually pays much attention to this stuff, I think they send these messages out randomly to kind of bluff their way to "making" a "better" network. Cricket is mostly likely going to dissolve or be merged with ATT Prepaid sometime next year anyway, around February or March. Which coincides with the final date for Cricket Rewards.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "I use around 200-300GB of data through hotspot tethering every month"

      You are using nothing beyond the service that you paid for. Well done !

      Delete
  20. 5 or 6gb a month is all anyone would ever really need. Any more than that, and you are a sort of data-hog, taking more than your fair share. Making it hard for everyone else.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Enough for you, maybe. Not everyone uses the same amount. Just as there are varied lifestyles there are varied data users.

      Delete
  21. 5 or 6gb a month is all anyone would ever really need. Any more than that, and you are a sort of data-hog, taking more than your fair share. Making it hard for everyone else.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I wonder if they have contacted people using PdaNet+ in the hide tethering mode ?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Been using pdanet for 2 years without the hide tether mode and I didn't get the message from cricket. Granted, I'm not using TBs, but have successfully used 3-4GB. Before pdanet included the feature to block windows updates, I'd catch it trying to DL those as well...missed it once, and DL 3Gb update at one session. :-(

      Delete
    2. Thanks for letting us know about that loophole. We will get that fixed. Signed Cricket

      Delete
    3. Wrong, you ain't no Cricket.

      Delete
  23. Filthy nasty data-thieveses

    *Gollum* *Gollum*

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm no thief. If I get throttled to slow speed after my HS is used up, what's that to you? I'm the one that suffers, not the network. It already gave me my allotment. Gosh, you need a real definition of thief!

      Delete
    2. Remember your CorpJP: you are a cheat if you use your data differently from how he would.

      Delete
  24. Love the anti-troll trolls hiding behind anon user names running their mouthes as much as they run up useless data livestreaming their cats with Go-Pros on in their mom's basement but still can't comp the facts.

    Fact: Cricket gives you unlimited, throttled, soft-capped MOBILE data. "Mobile Data" being data used directly on that specific device, not sent to it then shared with other devices. Cricket OFFERS HARD-CAPPED TETHER DATA. HARD CAPPED...TETHER...DATA...to do as you wish with, but per their ToS, you must pay for.

    It's not rocket science, but I get it if you're outside the box of comprehension.

    And to be clear, I never called anyone a thief, but if you practice what you preach, you are CHEATING THE SYSTEM per THEIR ToS.

    Chew on it for a while.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. CorpJP, Show me where I can sign up for a "tether plan" through cricket? If they don't offer something specifically, how can I pay for it specifically? The American way is to figure out how to do more with what we are given.

      Delete
    2. Mobile broadband capacity has finite limits. It's limited by the amount of licensed spectrum available as well as by infrastructure (towers, backhaul, internet gateway servers).

      Mobile networks can and do get overloaded. The carriers have the ability to control and prevent network congestion with data caps and de-prioritization thresholds.

      What I object to is carriers telling me how to use the data I buy from them. Data is like a utility, similar in characteristics to other utilities like water and electricity.

      The water and electric utilities charge me based on how much I use, not on what I use my water or power for. Cricket blocking or charging extra for hotspot is like the water utility telling me I can't use my water for bathing, only for drinking; or my electric utility saying I have to pay $10 extra to use the electricity I am already paying for to operate power tools.

      If I purchase 5 GB of high speed data from Cricket for $40, why should they be able to dictate what I use that 5 GB for. I bought it that data, I, not Cricket should own it.

      Delete
    3. " The American way is to figure out how to do more with what we are given."

      Considering all the dishonest claims around here about people demanding free stuff,perhaps the better wording might be "with what we have purchased".

      Because all of the hotspot and tether data being discussed has been paid for with real money.

      And it is riculous to call those who expect to receive what they purchased as being "me me me" selfish.

      I think CorpJP and all the hater/whiner trolls so t be happy until we reach a situation where no consumer who purchases services ever uses these services.

      We saw the whining hate before when they blamed the demise of RingPlus on those customees who used data in the amount of the monthly plans they purchased.

      Delete
    4. Dennis, in other words you aren't a thief if you pay your water bill and then make ice cubes with the water you paid for?

      Delete
  25. It appears all about me, me more me. Give me free tethering, give me unthrottled unlimited data. We have become a society of give me more for free and who cares about the rules. Everyone gets a participation trophy and contributes nothing. I really think Cricket just needs to cancel the abusers for breaking the TOS rules--simple and done!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ". I really think Cricket just needs to cancel the abusers for breaking the TOS rules--simple and done!"

      Yet, no one has mentioned any abuse yet. And "give me more for free" isn't even relevant: all the hotspot users have paid for the data already, and not a single one has complained about having to do so.

      You havebt do r a good job of reading the comments here.

      Delete
    2. "Yet, no one has mentioned any abuse yet"

      Hotspot misuse was mentioned in the article above. Users had not paid the $10 hot spot usage fee. Oversight, I doubt that I'd call that misuse. Just cancel them and be done with it.

      "You havebt do r a good job of reading the comments here"

      I've read the comments including approx 20 from you arguing with everyone. Check your spelling please.

      Delete
    3. Again, no misuse has been mentioned. It's not misuse since the data used in the hotspot was paid for, and no laws were broken. You need to think about what you type before click the blue "publish" button.

      And sorry, I am only arguing with liars. Those who claim abuse, misuse, theft, and cheating while knowing full well none of that occurs.

      Delete
    4. I agree with the OP. The tos is part of your user agreement that you accept when you use the service. Ignorance if the nature of this 'contract' is no excuse to violate it. If you're caught, don't blame the carrier. It's your fault. Man up. You agreed, then broke your agreement.

      Delete
  26. I think we are talking about two separate items here - tethering & hotpot. Hotspot is specifically against Tos, tethering on a limited HS data plan appears OK. Tos only state in Acceptable use policy, prohibited data use: ...(h) is resold either alone or as part of any other good or service; (i) tethers a Device to any other device (such as a computer, smartphone, other phones, eBook or eReader, media player, laptop, notebook, tablet, mobile hotspots, gaming consoles, or other devices with similar functions) in any manner, including, without limitation, through use of connection kits, applications, devices or accessories (using wired or wireless technology) UNLESS YOU HAVE SUBSCRIBED TO a Service plan with a limited high-speed data allowance and a FEATURE OFFERED SPECIFICALLY FOR TETHERING;

    ReplyDelete
  27. Dennis @ 10:06 AM - agreed, why should they be able to dictate how I use my data bucket?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Why should they dictate ? Because CorpJP subscribes to the junk science that binary bits aren't simply binary... they are actually shaded with a range of variation.

      Delete
  28. Ok, here is a useful new link:

    https://m.androidcentral.com/how-get-free-mobile-hotspot-your-android-phone

    "How to get free mobile hotspot for your Android phone."

    To some, this is "burglary tools". To the rest of us, those know what they're talking about, it's just an article on how people can make better use of the data that they have purchased. No more and no less. Like articles on optimizing speaker output for those who use streaming services, or tips on how to play downloaded games.

    ReplyDelete
  29. By the way, Dennis, has any crackdown on hotspot use ever held up in court?

    I have actually seen printed terms of service on published calendars. That prohibit people from buying these calendars and cutting up the pages that have copyrighted TV characters and using them in crafts and selling the crafts.

    I talked to someone who did this with crafts, and he said that any challenge by the calendar Publishers has been shot down. And the Crafters have full rights to do whatever they want with the calendars regardless of the terms of service. After all, they already bought them.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Yes, Cricket will most definitely suspend your account for using Hotspot without paying. Happened today to my husband. My phone wasn't affected, even though we're on the same account. He uses waaaaay more data than me though. When he called a few weeks ago, the lady said not to worry about it.. But it happened anyway.

    ReplyDelete
  31. "Hotspot misuse was mentioned in the article above. Users had not paid the $10 hot spot usage fee. Oversight, I doubt that I'd call that misuse. Just cancel them and be done with it.".

    It's better to simply find a way to mask that the use is "hotspot" and just keep on going....

    ReplyDelete
  32. I am a cricket customer on an "unlimited" plan. I have a rooted Android phone I tethered from daily. I am an avid gamer who unfortunately lives in a rural area where there are no options for Internet besides satellite, which has a ping of around 8000ms which is useless for gaming. I turned to tethering to game and watch videos. I have used anywhere from 30-250GB of data a month. Most data being game updates. I had done so for about a year until I received the warning from cricket. I persisted and they suspended my account. I called them and they turned my line back on but claimed they would cancel my account if I tethered again. This leaves me with mediocre phone service, no alternatives for Internet and gaming equipment that are essentially paperweights now. I understand that some use this technique to bypass getting home Internet service, but some of us have literally no viable alternative. So now I suppose my only option for Internet is to move. Truly unfortunate.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good luck finding a way around this. It's a shame they won't let you use the data you paid for.

      Delete
    2. That's impossible in most cases, bub.

      Cricket only takes payment for hotspot on a fraction on the devices on which it is possible to use hotspot. They refuse money on most devices, and I am sure that includes whatever device the above "avid gamer" streaming guy is using.

      Besides, the data has already been paid for. Any extra $10 is double-payment. Like paying the water bill, and then sending the utility company extra money just because you turn some of the water into ice cubes.

      Delete
    3. Ok never mind. Just move.

      Delete
  33. Move?? Sorry, data grinch. Far easier for him to do the research and find a way to use tether and not be detected than to move... Which is no more "theft" or "immoral" than making ice. He's already paying for the data, and it is abundantly available where he lives. No need to move.

    Avid Gamer: have you searched on XDA? Or tried a very good VPN?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 250gb / month is ‘unreasonable use’ and like tethering violates his user agreement. He can keep cheating but shouldn’t whine when they shut him down. Better to move or kick the habit then.

      Delete
    2. "Acceptable Data Uses
      Cricket's data services are intended to be used with a Device for the following permitted activities: ….. (e) using applications and content without excessively contributing to network congestion. You agree that Cricket may engage in any reasonable network management practice and that you will use Cricket's data services only for these Acceptable Data Uses.

      Prohibited Data Uses
      Cricket's data services are not intended to be used in any manner which has any of the following effects and such use is prohibited if in Cricket's sole discretion it: ….. (b) hinders other customers' access to the wireless network; (c) compromises network security or capacity; (d) excessively and disproportionately contributes to network congestion; (e) adversely impacts network service levels or legitimate data flows; (f) degrades network performance; … (i) tethers a Device to any other device (such as a computer, smartphone, other phones, eBook or eReader, media player, laptop, notebook, tablet, mobile hotspots, gaming consoles, or other devices with similar functions) in any manner, including, without limitation, through use of connection kits, applications, devices or accessories (using wired or wireless technology) unless you have subscribed to a Service plan with a limited high-speed data allowance and a feature offered specifically for tethering; (j) requires a specific Service plan or feature for that particular use and you have not subscribed to the required Service plan or feature; or (k) is excessive or unreasonable.
       
      Examples of Prohibited Data Uses
      Cricket's data services may not be used in any manner that has the effect of excessively and disproportionately contributing to network congestion, hindering other customers' access to the network, or degrading network performance by maintaining a sustained or continuous wireless data service connection or active wireless Internet connection.

      Cricket's data services may not be used with high bandwidth applications or, services and content not optimized to work with Cricket's wireless data services that disproportionately and excessively contribute to network congestion.

      In addition to any other actions Cricket may take for violations of this AUP, if in our sole discretion we reasonably believe that you are using Cricket's data services in any manner that is prohibited by this AUP, which Cricket may determine by reviewing your account's data usage, the Devices or devices used on your account, or in any other manner we determine appropriate, then we may without advance notice, and at our option, take any or all of the following actions: (a) reduce your data throughput speeds; (b) restrict, interrupt or terminate any data session; (c) suspend, cancel or terminate your data services; (d) terminate your account; (e) move you to a more appropriate service plan with increased data or high speed data access allowances; and/or (f) decline to renew your wireless service."

      Delete
    3. "250gb / month is ‘unreasonable use'"

      Just because you said it doesn't make it true. If the plan is advertised as unlimited data, 250GB is very reasonable as it falls within the advertised quantity limit.

      If he is indeed paying for unlimited, there is no way he is cheating.

      Words do have meanings.

      Delete
    4. 250 GB is reasonable. I usually need between 150 and 250 of tether a month. People need data just like they need electricity. Cricket is on the wrong side of history on this issue and should not be hiding behind their TOS words.

      Delete
    5. "250 GB is reasonable."

      If you paid for it, use it. Good for you!

      We have lots of data grinches who are quick to accuse anyone who uses more data than they do of being a thief.

      Delete
    6. Cricket Wireless defined and qualified 'unlimited' by including descriptions of acceptable and prohibited use in the tos. Denying that 'avid gamer' agreed to the tos when he/she used Cricket service doesn't negate the fact that he/she did.

      'avid gamer' agreed in acceptingthe dos that Cricket Wireless can determine at its 'sole discretion' whether 'avid gamer's' use is prohibited. Cricket Wireless did that, so all denials are irrelevant unless used to convince Cricket they made a mistake.

      Yes, words have consequences. If 'avid gamer' exists and their story is true, the account is on a Cricket Wireless watch list. Continued prohibited activity, such as using 250GB/month while tethering on rural towers will eventually result in a penalty such as account cancellation. No doubt the rural neighbors will enjoy faster access after that, the whole purpose of the tos. Protect the expectations of fast service for 110M+ users of the $multi-billion AT&T-owned network by restricting or eliminating the prohibited activities of a relatively tiny number of customers - Those who engaged in prohibited use despite what they agreed when they accepted the dos by using Cricket service.

      'gamer' doesn't have to move yet, but maybe they should think about packing. Or drive to the nearest McD, iHop or Starbucks to take some bandwidth.

      Delete
    7. "Cricket Wireless defined and qualified 'unlimited' by..."

      Cricket Wireless is not the OED. They can't just define words Willy nilly.

      Delete
    8. "No doubt the rural neighbors will enjoy faster access after that"

      They won't notice a difference.

      Delete
    9. "Cricket Wireless is not the OED. They can't just define words Willy nilly."

      The only definitions that matters legally are the definitions in the contract, the Cricket Wireless service agreement. 'gamer' will learn that if they go to arbitration (and pay the arbitrator when they lose). 'gamer' won't get a sympathetic jury that feels sorry for them because the tos were tl;dr.

      Delete
    10. "They won't notice a difference."

      Translation: Cheating is OK if nobody notices. Slippery slope.

      Delete
    11. Sorry, the translation doesn't work since no cheating is involved. Only "relatively high data usage" is involved.

      Perhaps some of us can make a new years' resolution not to whine that it is a crime any time anyone uses more data than we do... Along with a resolution not to needlessly bash Sprint all the time.

      Delete
    12. Avid Gamer simply needs to use a VPN or other alteration. He has paid for the data, and is therefore no cheater or thief. After this, it is his business what he does with the data, as long as it doesn't break actual laws.

      If Cricket arrogantly presumes a right to micro-manage how Avid uses the data he bought, perhaps Cricket owes him a refund. Because it is then like he bought nothing.

      Delete
    13. Tethering and hot spot use on Cricket unlimited plans is prohibited use, cheating.
      'gamer' did not pay for any prohibited data uses listed above. Doing those things is cheating.
      Cricket alone gets to decide whether 'gamer' is cheating, and they did. If 'gamer' doesn't agree, they can ask an arbitrator to decide. And pay more when they lose.

      Cheating 'smarter' is still cheating. When Cricket sees the continued high data use pattern and cancels the account, it's not their fault for enforcing the contract. Man up; no whining.

      Delete
    14. "Tethering and hot spot use on Cricket unlimited plans is prohibited use, cheating."

      It's the first but not the second.

      Delete
  34. Here is something on XDA for the "avid gamer" to check out:

    https://forum.xda-developers.com/g4-play/how-to/guide-hide-usb-tethering-usage-linux-t3556782

    There is hope. Again, good luck.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Laughing at the TrollsDecember 26, 2017 at 10:11 AM

    Person 1: "I used 28 gb of data last month.'

    Person 2: "I used only 27 gb of data. No one needs to use as much as you! You are a data guzzler and a THIEF!"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous December 26, 2017 at 10:08 AM is "Person 2"

      Delete
  36. The FTC should ban all 'Unlimited' plans or enforce a definition that says people can use as much mobile data as they want, any way they want. This will put an end to all the nonsense, and virtually everybody will get faster mobile data.
    Most carriers and hotspot ISPs will just cancel their unlimited plans. The rest will raise prices to a profitable level and/or set low throttles, like 1.5 Mbps for one price, and 6 Mbps for a much higher price. Say around $80/month and $175/month. The only way Clear could charge $35 and $50 for these services was by having small areas of WiMax 4G with a lot of unused network capacity. And we know what happened to Karma. We won't see those low prices for a long time, maybe with mature 5G.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your either-or solves a problem that does not exist.

      Delete
    2. I would rather have faster data. Let the data hogs pay their fair share of mobile network capacity used. gamer addicts will move to where they can have unlimited wired broadband, where they belong.

      Delete
    3. If the FTC bans unlimited plans, they need to establish a reasonable price for data and strictly regulate the carriers. Any carrier that "cheats" and charges higher prices should punished with high fines. For instance, 1.5 Mbps service should be billed at 10 cents per GB, 3 Mbps service should be billed at 30 cents per GB, and fast possible service should be billed at 50 cents per GB. Customer should be able to tether without additional fee.

      Delete
    4. Price controls don’t work. That’s what we had with ma bell and for 30 years we had only one wall phone and one desk phone, both black. Long distance cost $1/minute to call across country. And Nixon’s gas price controls caused long lines and odd-even day buying controls based of your license number.
      With your proposed prices Network modernization would come to a halt. You could talk and text, that’s it. It would take us back to 1984. Of course it’s a perfect example of gov overreach just like net neutrality. The fcc should have just sanctioned actual content blocking and throttling by Comcast and other bad actors.

      Delete
    5. I know price controls do not work. But, in a world without NN, I do not see a better option.

      Delete
    6. I think leaving it alone is better. The only problem is one percieved in the imagination of some customers who obsess over how other customers use their data.

      Delete
    7. "Price controls don’t work. That’s what we had with ma bell and for 30 years we had only one wall phone and one desk phone, both black. Long distance cost $1/minute to call across country"

      I generally agree with you on this. However there are other realities that kept things the way they were which were much more important than price controls in the situation. Such as technology.

      You seem to imply that the price controls kept us away from the era of competitive smartphones for 30 years. But the fact is the technology and the Networks just weren't there and there was no capability of inventing or creating them at that time.

      The Ma Bell Monopoly wasn't keeping a 1960s Steve Jobs from introducing an amazing iPhone around the time of the Apollo moon landing. No way.

      Delete
    8. When you control the price of something at a low level, companies produce and/or import less of it. That's why people are starving in Venezuela. Not enough food and a company breaks the law and it is seized if it charges more than the controlled prices.

      Bell could only make a small, single-digit profit as a percentage of costs. All rate changes had to be approved by the government. If Bell lowered their costs, their profit went down. Little incentive and few profits to invest in the new technology that we saw invented soon after competition was introduced in 1982 (or 4?) when Reagan signed the law that deregulated telecom and broke up Bell.

      People complain so much about Unlimited plan restrictions and definitions, but when someone suggests taking them away they complain about that too. I guess the cheating on user agreements will continue as long as companies offer unlimited plans. People cheated on gas lines during rationing too. They bought extra cars with odd or even plate numbers so they could buy limited, rationed gas every day. And in NYC people bought old taxis so they could buy gas every day.
      There will always be cheaters.

      Delete
    9. That's fine and dandy, but what you describe with the user agreements for cell carriers doesn't count as cheating at all. It simply doesn't meet the definition, And is this a meaningless pejorative that actually skirts with violating the rules that Dennis has for this blog. Just a meaningless insult.

      The users are paying for the data. And is the case with Cricket, for the vast majority of the phones Cricket refuses to accept tether payments anyway.

      Delete
    10. Engaging in prohibited data use as described in the tos is cheating.
      Rationalize all you want.

      Delete
    11. Saying something over and over that has no basis doesn't make it true:

      "Engaging in prohibited data use as described in the tos is cheating.
      Rationalize all you want"

      Nothing to rationalize: the avid gamer has already paid for his data.

      Delete
  37. They already do pay their fair share.

    I'm fine with them using mobile. It doesn't affect me... Or you.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Price controls don't work because those setting them, legislators and bureaucrats, simply aren't qualified to set these values. So they just pull some numbers from thin air and decree them from on high with often catastrophic results.

    Like with New York rent control, and minimum wage. Tampering with the latter always forces employers to fire thousands of low-wage workers, and is a major driving force toward replacing workers with automation and also offshoring jobs. No employer has extra money laying around to pay someone who is actually earning $7 an hour $12 an hour instead. They simply don't have money to throw away like this.

    Price controls on American cellular data would have significant unforeseen outcomes ... Such as because the government is now preventing companies from charging a fair rate for data, they end up sticking to the price controlled rates, but when it comes to the end of the month, they charge you a $35 "billing fee" just to take care of your monthly bill.

    Or they forcibly bundle an artificially low price data plan with a very high-priced minutes of talk and text plan. $0.70 per talk minute for domestic calls, here we come!

    No one is in the business of giving stuff away. If the price controls mandate that, the companies will find another way to make money.

    ReplyDelete
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