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T-Mobile Expands 600MHz Coverage to 586 Cities in Total

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T-Mobile recently received positive feedback on its customer satisfaction in 2017. Apart from this, the carrier has another update to share to its customers who are patiently waiting.

On its website, T-Mobile announced that its 600MHz coverage is now available in 586 cities. The list of cities include the likes of Omaha, Nebraska; Jacksonville, Pennsylvania; Y-O Ranch, Wyoming; and Greenview, California. If you are wondering whether or not your city is included in the full list, you can click here to check.

Now if your location is included in the list of cities and you wish to make the most out of the 600MHz coverage, T-Mo wants to help you out. As announced, the carrier plans to launch over 12 new 600MHz-capable devices this year.

Although T-Mobile did not name what these specific devices were, the carrier promised that there will be a variety of these models with some that would be budget-friendly and some flagship models. As of this writing, T-Mobile sells two 600MHz-capable devices: the Samsung Galaxy S8 Active and the LG V30.

The third bit of news that T-Mo shared today is that it has decided to close the agreement to buy the remaining interest of Iowa Wireless from Aureon. If you can still recall, this deal was first announced on September 26th and has finally been closed yesterday, January 2nd.

Now that T-Mo has acquired Iowa Wireless, T-Mobile's LTE coverage in Iowa and western Illinois can be expanded. Pretty soon, these customers can get access to the different benefits offered by T-Mo. 


Source: Tmo News

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55 comments:

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  1. You forgot to copy the best part from the Tmo News article:

    "T-Mobile says that its 4G LTE network now covers 322 million people."
    That's as much as or more than Verizon or AT&T.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's the square miles.

      Saying a mobile network covers so many people is meaningless since most of them don't stay put.

      And T-Mobile is rapidly increasing square miles.

      Delete
    2. Square miles where people go is what really matters. Trees and rocks don’t use cellphones.

      Delete
    3. And you will find very little of the territory of the lower 48 where no people go.

      T-Mobile plans to cover every corner.

      Delete
    4. Let's see if the "trees and rocks" guy can find us a county in the lower 48 where there are no people at all living there or visiting.

      I expect crickets.

      Delete
    5. "Square miles where people go is what really matters."

      Have you driven those square miles or do you just fly over them?

      Delete
  2. Once millennials population outnumber all other older generation, T-Mobile will become the largest Wireless carrier in the US since Gen X, Baby boomer etc. consider network quality over price when choosing a carrier.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Baby boomer etc. consider network quality over price when choosing a carrier"

      Ohh.. that means the older ones will go T-Mobile also.

      Delete
    2. Not really since T-mobile has great coverage but their network quality is not as good as Verizon (indoor).

      Delete
    3. For all those expecting T-Mobile's prices to stay the same once the 600 MHz goes live (and coverage matches if not eclipses Verizon's,) you're in for a rude awakening.

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    4. Baby boomers and older as you describe them grew up with only a slim line dial phone with a 15 foot cord and a party line hanging on their wall so even only poor or partial coverage is just icing on the cake. Millennials & Gen-X'ers really have no clue how one can survive without Facebook and Snapchat.

      Delete
    5. "Baby boomers and older as you describe them grew up with only a slim line dial phone with a 15 foot cord and a party line hanging on their wall so even only poor or partial coverage is just icing on the cake"

      You attempt to smear anyone older than a Gen-X as some sort of luddite. Well, you will be shocked at the amount of money we stuck-in-the-past old fogies are spending on modern audio equipment, phones, and electronics.

      Oh. and we aren't all driving 1978 Buicks either. In fact, none of us are. And none of us are stuck in an 8-track mindset and consider digital audio as just "icing on the cake".

      Get with it, whippersnapper!

      Delete
    6. I think you better read again "whippersnapper" I don't think the person was berating older people but the entitled younger. Read, absorb & then respond.

      Delete
    7. It is exceptionally ill-informed to characterize Baby Boomers in the same light as the generations who lived in the 20th century who grew up without television, or electricity in every room. The *parents* of Baby Boomers were advanced enough to go to the Moon and back more than once. Baby Boomers lives have been digital from jump; not everything, of course, but all things digital had their origins in military technology of the 1940's. It is unfair and ignorant to characterize a whole generation based on the handful who don't understand "the computras" and "the cell phones."

      Delete
  3. We just got t mobile in Salem Indiana and the service is so much better than big red.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. T Mobile is German, of course its the best

      Delete
    2. T-Mobile US is HQed in the US state of Washington. Let's stay off the foreign ownership angle as it would be veeerrry hard to explain the cluster that is Sprint.

      Delete
    3. T Mobile is not German. Their major stock holder is in Germany but that's the extent of your rumor.

      Delete
    4. "T Mobile is not German. Their major stock holder is in Germany but that's the extent of your rumor."

      T-Mobile is indeed German. It is the brand name used by the mobile communications subsidiaries of the German telecommunications company Deutsche Telekom AG.

      Delete
    5. I bet (sarcasm). Doesn't big red operate on 700mhz or whatever which is why everyone says they are the best? I'll be amazed if tmo's 660 can outperform that, unless they plan on adding towers to fill in the gaps.

      Delete
    6. Adding towers to fill gaps is exactly what T-Mobile says they are going to do. They won nationwide 600 Mhz spectrum in the last FCC auction and have announced that they will use it to greatly expand their network footprint. The new 600 Mhz locations announced yesterday have already resulted in a modest increase in coverage.

      There's a new toggle on the T-Mobile's coverage map at www.t-mobile.com/coverage/coverage-map that lets you show and hide 600 Mhz coverage. You have to zoom in a few steps to notice the difference. A couple of places where you can see it clearly are around Park Falls WI and just east of Redding CA.

      Delete
    7. This is fantastic, what a quick build out to this level! I thought it would be more like 2019.

      Dennis, thanks for that note about the coverage map. But it seems that the press release and map don't align well. The PDF lists Ironwood Michigan as covered, but the map only shows an area north of Ironwood along Lake Superior when you flip 600MHz on. Anyway, I'll have to get a phone with 600MHz

      Delete
    8. T-Mobile US operates in the US so of course it has its HQ in the US but it takes its orders from its German parent company. It is not like Sprint. T-Mobile is owned by a German telecommunications company. And like many German companies they actually care about the products and services they provide. Unlike AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, Comcast and most American owned companies that don't care about the quality of the services they provide, don't care about customer satisfaction, don't care about their reputation, don't care about making their products the best they can be. All our companies care about is maximizing profit at all costs with no concern or respect for their customers. Bring in more competition from Germany and other countries that actually have pride in their products and respect for their customers and our American mega corporations won't know how to hold on to their customers because they never even thought about showing them some respect.

      Delete
    9. All four carriers are public companies. They are owned by their shareholders. The majority of the shares of both T-Mobile and Sprint are owned by non-US telecom companies.
      Deutsche Telecom owns 64.5% of T-Mobile USA shares.
      Japan's SoftBank owns 83% of Sprint shares.

      Delete
    10. "All our companies care about is maximizing profit at all costs with no concern or respect for their customers."

      This is true of corporations the world over. The only difference here is that some, such as German ones, have fooled you into thinking that they are all sunshine and puppies and world peace.

      It is similar with politicians. Like politicians, all corporations are in it for self-serving reasons and make "Looking Out for Number 1" the main thing.

      The only difference between different politicians, or between different corporations, is in how much they can fool people into thinking they are on the people's side.

      Delete
  4. This tech-challenged, uninformed reader (but one who likes to learn) has a question: what is 600 MHz coverage, and why / how is it a benefit? Would appreciate any information that any of you could share... thank you very much.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a newly available sect of radio frequencies, recently/soon to be vacated by legacy UHF stations. T-Mobile has the right to use this to expand to cover the rest of America (because it still has a huge coverage gap even after its earlier expansion using 700 mhz frequences)

      Others have rights to these frequencies as well, but T-Mobile is making the biggest use.

      ------------------

      It means that in a year or two, a modern T-Mobile phone that you will buy will cover as well as Verizon and AT&T.

      Delete
    2. @Anonymous January 4, 2018 at 8:16 AM,
      Thank you very much for your reply and the excellent explanation! This lifelong learner (albeit quite a bit behind the tech curve) really appreciates it. Thanks again!

      Delete
    3. You are welcome. I meant "set" not "sect" in my description. T-Mobile is not a religion....Well, not for most, anyway.

      The other important thing to remember is that only two models support it so far.

      Delete
  5. Who really wants to be a early adopter, when ANY $30 ATT prepaid phone will get full coverage, and ATT MVNOs aren't any more expensive than TMo? It'll be something once fully rolled out, if prices stay competitive, but with any luck ATT & Verizon will have 5G networks in place veggie TMo finishes 600Mhz LTE.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cricket's not bad, true, but I went with T-Mobile because it has a great international roaming package included... while Cricket only has international roaming to two other countries.

      Delete
    2. T-Mobile's great international roaming package is not available to prepaid customers, unfortunately.

      Delete
    3. Excellent point.

      I admit I mix up prepaid and postpaid a lot more now, especially since the big contract postpaid plans are giving way to month by month payment options.

      Delete
    4. Seems that to me but I like having choices.

      Delete
    5. I agree on the choices, but for me the main difference between prepaid and postpaid now amounts to nothing more than whether you pay at the beginning of the month or the end of the month.

      Then after that there is the less cut-and-dried situation of postpaid allowing more premium features and prepaid costing less but being at the back of the bus when it comes to priority and other matters.

      Delete
    6. I get tired of Anons that make grand claims about carrier X, Y or Z being "full coverage". In my experience that is highly variable based on location, cell phone, etc. If you are from a particular state, maybe AT&T is generally best. Other states it might be Verizon.

      For two personal examples: (1) my old landline is currently on a two year old AT&T flip phone. It will ring indoors, but if you try to answer it, the call drops. (2) my home town has had fantastic Verizon coverage for 15 years. Last year, they dropped a tower, now it is hit or miss whether a call will work.

      I was very leery of moving to TMO last year (on a Teltik $23 plan). But I get a pretty good signal indoors using a 700MHz Band 12 signal. And Teltik does include international coverage on their plan, which worked out great for me last summer in the eastern UP of MI. Fantastic high speed connection off Canadian towers across the North Channel.

      Delete
    7. Nothing to get "tired of". When a carrier covers 95% of the lower 48 territory, it's not a stretch to call it "full coverage" and it will meet the needs of everyone... everyone except the small proportion that lives in or goes to that small bit of uncovered territory.

      Good coast-to-coast coverage means a lot... That you won't need 3 phones and carriers just to cross the country, and chances are the one phone you have will work 4 counties over. AT&T and Verizon so far have been the only ones to provide this. Their customer totals attest to their success at doing this.

      Delete
    8. No carrier covers "95% of the lower 48 territory." Verizon only claims 2.4M square miles, or less than 77%.
      Nobody has a requirement to have one cellphone that "covers 95% (or 77%) of the lower 48 territory," so this is a strawman argument. People are smart enough to decide which coverage works best for them without the preaching that "bigger is always better."
      All the major carriers offer widespread roaming coverage to help their customers connect in areas off the native network. People don't need to be told they also need lots of data roaming coverage (to watch video, I guess) so they have to pick one of the two most expensive networks.
      T-Mobile has doubled its subscribers over the past 5 years, picking up more than 1M new customers/quarter for the past 18 quarters in a row (primarily from Verizon and AT&T). The T-Mobile network is so much better now that it would meet the needs of a large percentage of Verizon and AT&T subscribers, and offer better overall value.
      The duopoly now has to compete by offering Unlimited Plans and lowering prices. They know they cannot rely on the old 'superior network' argument like they did before (yes, even with all the robo-posts).
      Millions of customers are reading coverage maps for themselves and switching away from AT&T and Verizon to get better value, not just a lower price. This will continue.

      Delete
    9. "People are smart enough to decide which coverage works best for them without the preaching that "bigger is always better."

      It is because they are smart that they know bigger IS better, or in other words, a carrier that "just works" is better. This is why year after year, even though T-Mobile is starting to close the gap, 4 times as many people choose the two good nationwide networks, Verizon and AT&T, over T-Mobile, and the smallest of the Big 4 suffers for being so small.

      "All the major carriers offer widespread roaming coverage to help their customers connect in areas off the native network"

      But it doesn't help much, and is only worth a footnote. Roaming varies from no data to very little data at all, and the minutes/texts allotments on roaming are often quite grudging. All of it to the point where you really need to look mainly at native coverage. Roaming doesn't really make up for having a bad network.

      "Millions of customers are reading coverage maps for themselves and switching away from AT&T and Verizon to get better value, not just a lower price. This will continue"

      It will continue at a relatively slow rate, and really take off once T-Mobile gets good national coverage by 2020. Until then, people can just get Verizon and AT&T without worrying about coverage maps.

      "They know they cannot rely on the old 'superior network' argument like they did before ."

      Hold your horses: the T-Mobile network is still way behind. For the next couple of years, Verizon and AT&T can confidently advertise on the "superior network" idea. Once T-Mobile completes the 600mhz rollout, there will be 3 superior networks. But that is not the way it is today.

      Delete
    10. "4 times as many people choose the two good nationwide networks, Verizon and AT&T, over T-Mobile,"

      Verizon and AT&T users are mostly "choosing" to do nothing. Coverage is only one reason, not THE reason as you imply. A small percentage of subscribers actually switch from any network, despite low ratings for Verizon and AT&T 'value' in customer satisfaction surveys. The hassle of switching, perceived need to buy new phones, their lack of information about improvement in other networks, inertia of busy lives and yes, the mis-information advertised about other networks by Verizon and AT&T are barriers to switching. The dam is leaking steadily, though, and these leaks accelerate, not stay "slow rate" as friends and neighbors report good experiences after switching. I'm sure Vzw and AT&T don't consider losing millions of subscribers every year to T-Mobile is a small problem, because they were forced to compete on price and offer Unlimited plans. They will continue to advertise 'superior network' to stem leaks because they HAVE TO, but it's less and less true, and not longer enough.

      "it (roaming) doesn't help much, and is only worth a footnote. Roaming varies from no data to very little data at all, and the minutes/texts allotments on roaming are often quite grudging. .. you really need to look mainly at native coverage. Roaming doesn't really make up for having a bad network."

      Denying that roaming "helps much" is folly. Roaming agreements have made T-Mobile and Sprint relevant as nationwide carriers for years. Roaming restrictions on postpaid voice and text are minimal; they don't affect the vast majority of potential switchers. T-Mobile prepaid users also get very generous voice and text roaming. Roaming data restrictions affect video users and heavy surfers. People who don't need to do this in roaming areas shouldn't be lectured to pick Verizon and AT&T; they can think for themselves.
      Bad network? The T-Mobile network doesn't fit that description.

      Delete
    11. I'm looking what customers are actually choosing, instead of what you wish customers were doing instead. And coverage has the most Major Impact on customer choice. Because if the phone doesn't work it's useless.

      Maybe it wasn't right to call T-Mobile a bad network. But it is still only two thirds as good as the two bigger ones.

      If the current rates it will take T-Mobile 30 years to catch up with AT&T or Verizon. But once T-Mobile has great coverage (which it does not right now) there will be nothing stopping at from catching up.

      You seem to be wishing and Imagining the TMobile were better than it is now. That's your inner fanboy talking. That's nothing but wishing on your part. Just be patient, in a couple of years it should be as good as you think it is right now.

      Delete
    12. Roaming isn't very good. There are major restrictions, and it's nowhere near as good as native coverage. Of course this is why the two big networks are Far and Away the most successful. They have good coverage in most of the country instead of way too much of the coverage being significantly inferior crippled roaming coverage.

      It does no good to pretend and imagine that roaming is any better than it is.

      Delete
  6. I wonder if they have yet activated 600mhz coverage in other cities where they have 600mhz licenses for but existing coverage (700mhz,1900mhz). They sure could use it to fill the holes in my town.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. http://maps.spectrumgateway.com/t-mobile-600-mhz-band-71-deployment.html

      Delete
    2. Thanks- No 600mhz active in my area yet and their existing coverage is like swiss cheese for me. Verizon #1, ATT #2


      "AnonymousJanuary 4, 2018 at 11:23 AM

      http://maps.spectrumgateway.com/t-mobile-600-mhz-band-71-deployment.html "

      Delete
    3. "Thanks- No 600mhz active in my area yet and their existing coverage is like swiss cheese for me. Verizon #1, ATT #2"

      Yes, this is why the vast majority are still saying no to T-Mobile. But if you check a year from now, it should be a LOT better.

      Delete
  7. This 600 mhz coverage in almost 600 cities and expanding. What Band is this? Why are the only phones that cover it the S8 Active and LG V30?
    Not even the Note 8 or iPhone X has these bands? Why? Is everyone preparing for the 5G network instead?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ut's Band 71 and the reason more phones don't support is that it didn't exist anywhere until a couple of months ago. If band 71 is like other new bands when they launched (bands 66, 12, 29 and 30) it will be a couple of years before it's widely supported by new phone releases.

      Delete
    2. Band 71, first fielded in August 17 will be supported faster than other bands. T-Mobile is releasing 12 devices this year. Qualcomm announced RF chipsets in October that will let phone manufacturers support Band 71 in low cost to high-end phones, which will all be available this year.

      "Qualcomm's new chips are known as the "RF front end," and they're amplifiers and tuners designed to connect a physical antenna to a phone's modem. But the key is that they let devices with 700MHz antennas, which are common, connect to the 600MHz network. Qualcomm is announcing components that work with processors all the way from the bottom-of-the-line, feature-phone Snapdragon 205 to the premium Snapdragon 835.
      "This basically allows an OEM to reuse their existing 700MHz antenna, but, with antenna tuning, allow it to pick up 600MHz signals," said Sherif Hanna, Staff Manager of Product Marketing for 4G and 5G at Qualcomm.
      S: PC Magazine 10/16/17

      Delete
  8. Those who keep claiming that "overage doesn't matter" are usually shilling for second-string networks that most customers have rejected due to the inadequate coverage.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It really depends on an individual's needs. It's just like someone who pays for unlimited data when they use half a gig except that one month in the summer when they travel. Paying for perceived better coverage is kind of pointless if you rarely travel outside your home area.

      A Google Voice or other OTT plan can mitigate that occasional travel time by utilizing motel/coffee shop/library etc Wi-Fi.

      Or, I used to buy prefunded SIMs from eBay for our summer travels.

      For a couple years I had no monthly text/call plan and used GV on Wi-Fi. Fit my needs at the time and coverage played zero role.

      Delete
    2. "Paying for perceived better coverage...."

      There's nothing "perceived": there are some huge coverage differences across the range of the top 5 carriers. Regardless of there being some who never leave their homes... there are indeed large numbers on ankle-monitoring systems... this proportion of the overall population is quite small. And they are better suited to keep landlines than get mobile phones.

      As for the rest, the vast majority get cell service from one of the two carriers with good nationwide coverage. Soon there will be three, but not yet.

      Delete
    3. So everyone needs nationwide coverage. Everyone needs exactly what you prescribe or they are better off with land lines?

      Is it possible for you to imagine there is a wide spectrum of users out there - beyond the end of your nose, - that have vastly differing needs for cell? And location is vital in the consideration. Honestly, in my home town T-Mobile band 12 is best, AT&T is second, Verizon is third and Sprint is a distant fourth. Why would I sign with A or V when T has best coverage and signal for 95% of my days? Makes no sense unless you are you.

      Delete
  9. Mr. Bournique,
    Is only 600mhz available at these cell sites or have they also added 1900mhz too?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When I toggle 600 Mhz on and off on the T-Mobile coverage map it looks like T-Mobile is:
      1) adding 600 Mhz to existing towers, extending the towers' range.
      2) Building new 600 Mhz only towers in places T-Mobile didn't have any service at all.

      Delete
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