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Report: Huawei Devices No Longer Available at Best Buy

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Uh-oh! It looks like Huawei will have an even tougher time trying to enter the US market.

Back in January, reports flooded in that both AT&T and Verizon decided to pull out of deals to carry the smartphones offered by the Chinese company. This decision was made from the pressure that the US government put on the two companies.

Recently, new reports have emerged that Best Buy has joined the ship and has ended the partnership it inked with Huawei. Seeing this was Huawei's only chance at entering the US market, this is a big blow to the company.

The report shows that Best Buy's decision could be because of the same pressure they received from the government. According to reports, the giant retail chain has stopped making new smartphone orders from Huawei. In the next few weeks, it is expected to stop selling these products altogether.

As of this writing, it is unclear whether or not the Huawei Honor line will be affected by this decision too. Right now, customers can still get their hands on a Huawei device via Amazon, Newegg, and B&H.

No comment has been made from spokespeople from either Best Buy and Huawei.



Source: AndroidPolice

21 comments:

Comment Page :
  1. But I wanna trade in my Huawei Nexus 6P for a new Galaxy ('-')

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  2. Too bad for Best Buy

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    1. Worse for Huawei, who needs a Best Buy more than Best Buy needs a Huawei.

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  3. Witch hunt by the US govt. Snowden showed us it was the NSC who was spying on us. There’s absolutely no proof the phones which are sold all over the world does any spying. Unless we are stupid enough to not detect it. I’m buying one because they’re good phones for the price.

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    1. Maybe NSC / USA govt. doesn't like Huawei because backdoor is owned by China and not by them.

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    2. I pretty much agree with the OP. I have a ZTE ZMAX Pro and it is a good phone for the money.

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  4. I'm keeping my Huaweis. I can't imagine my life is that much out of the ordinary and exciting enough for anyone to bother spying on me. :)

    If spying is really an issue, what keeps the US Government from banning these companies from selling products in the US - period?

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  5. Literally all phones are made overseas, so all phones present a potential cybersecurity problem simply by virtue of the supply chain being vulnerable at every level rather than just the corporate one.

    It's also not about sticking it to China either, as the only real losers are consumers who now have less choice and competition without any real gains.

    Don't get me wrong, the WTO and NAFTA were huge mistakes that functioned primarily as a "win MORE" condition for the already affluent.

    But the biggest trade and cybersecurity problems are more a consequence of the post-60s economic dogma that facilited mass outsourcing of essential information technology rather than Huawei selling some stuff in Best Buy.

    They're just a company doing business in other parts of the world akin to the traveling merchants of old, while the real culprits behind America's economic and security woes (globalists) continue to get away with it.

    Anyway, the point is that it's not justifiable to scapegoat Huawei of you're not also going to go full protectionism and revitalize the American economy to make up for potential higher prices as a result of decreased competition.

    Either you go all in or you do absolutely nothing, because half-assing will just make Americans both poorer AND unable to avoid material goods.

    Or maybe that's the point, since it seems our highly incompetent aristocratic class can only feel joy by inflicted massive suffering unto large swaths of the country.

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    1. I guess there's an argument to be made that if it's the supply chain of an American (or allied nation) company that's compromised, the US government can still enforce some degree of accountability whereas if it's an entirely "hostile" operation like Huawei, the indictments would be worth less than the paper they're printed on.

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  6. my huawei phones were certified by the FCC. if the government really wanted to stop people buying these phones, they would make the FCC stop certifying huawei phones. that's not happening. but really what they do is put political pressure on companies to stop selling the phones. it's all about stopping chinese phone and telecom companies from making money in the U.S. by taking big chunks of the market from US companies like Apple and tanking the stock prices of american companies because people will want to buy better cheaper chinese phones certified for use with the right LTE bands for the US. but you just watch what comes next with tarrifs on chinese network equipment and chinese phones. expect to pay as much as $10-$50 more as an extra tariff tax on chinese brandname phones. the current trump government sees china as a strategic economic competitor, and so there is this big game now to stop chinese companies by scaring people into thinking chinese companies are spying, by putting political pressure on at&t and verizion and now bestbuy to not sell huawei phones. my fear is that tariffs are next. watch for the new tariffs list of hundreds of products to come out and look for the phones that are likely to show up on the list. the government will cry spying and technology transfer theft. this is all an ongoing tit-for-tat game. for instance, if china let google and facebook in, this could possibly be less of a problem (although still a problem). so the thinking goes if china ban our online companies like google and facebook, then we'll eventually (when particularly now we have trump in the WH) ban or scare people or put political pressure to stop or least greatly diminish sales of china-made hardware in the US. although may not be able to legally stop the phones (geez the FCC is certifying huawei and zte phones), then put obstacles in the way like scare tactics, and accusations of spying, and putting political pressure on companies to not sell the phones. put obstacles in the way to discourage sales of these products in the US. tariffs could be next where you are paying more for phones. if more expensive or too scary, most people will buy something else. this is a hardball fullcourt-press economics market game being played.

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    1. It's only political theater.

      If the goal was to seriously protect US companies and workers, Huawei wouldn't be the only chinese company getting shafted.

      We'd also use their currency manipulation, dumping, abysmal human rights record, abuse of labor and refusal to fully open/privatize their markets as a reason to re-evaluate their WTO status and have ourselves and our allies ban them from western markets.

      And when the only way to get value out of having resources in china would be an unregulated and incredibly niche black market that was constantly under siege by the feds (i.e. silk road) there simply wouldn't be a big enough economy of scale to justify not moving to a more US friendly location.

      That's what real economic hardball would look like, treasonous investor class be damned.

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  7. This is disappointing news.

    So will Best Buy stop selling the Cricket Wireless branded Huawei Elate ?

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    1. You can still buy The Cricket Wireless branded Huawei Elate @ Best Buy this week for the FULL PRICE OF $64.99 WITHOUT $30 refill card & activation bundle. They'll cost extra.
      LOL!

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    2. Bruh, the website's still selling it.

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    3. Like story says
      "According to reports, the giant retail chain has stopped making new smartphone orders from Huawei. In the next few weeks, it is expected to stop selling these products altogether."

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    4. @Anon755, is the Cricket Huawei a "smartphone from Huawei" or Cricket, though? I suspect its the latter, so I think the phone will continue to be sold as per BB's agreements with Cricket.

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    5. Since AT&T who owns Cricket is not going to sell Huawei phones, I expect there won't be any further Cricket Huawei phones made/sold either.

      I'm not planning to stop using my Huaweis anytime soon :)

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    6. @Anon1238, good point about AT&T's decision. I'm hoping there's some autonomy as far as Cricket goes, or a carriage agreement (amount of time, number of units, etc) between Cricket and Huawei that the former's going to have to honor, or simply a realization on Cricket's part that they need players in the mid to low-range market. I hope Huawei had good lawyers in face of bad leverage because we NEED more variety in the marketplace. Just two OSes is bad enough.

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  8. No more Huawei phone orders by AT&T or Cricket. After the retail chain supply from At&t runs out you’ll have to buy unlocked phones from another source. Good riddance. ZTE will be next.

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    1. Plenty of online Huawei sources mentioned in the main article. Does Best Buy still sell ZTE phones - I wonder.

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  9. “Threats to national security posed by certain communications equipment providers are a matter of bipartisan concern,” FCC Chairman Pai said yesterday. “Hidden ‘back doors’ to our networks in routers, switches — and virtually any other type of telecommunications equipment — can provide an avenue for hostile governments to inject viruses, launch denial-of-service attacks, steal data, and more.”

    Pai plans for the FCC to vote next month on a rule that would bar U.S. companies from using a federal subsidy program to purchase equipment from companies entangled with foreign intelligence agencies (like Huawei and ZTE). The proposed rule is being considered in light of congressional concern that AT&T and Verizon might purchase phones or other hardware from Huawei, a company that the U.S. intelligence community believes is in cooperation with Chinese spies.

    “I believe that the FCC has the responsibility to ensure that this money is not spent on equipment or services that pose a threat to national security,” Pai said.

    S: Washington Examiner

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