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Apple: In Deep Water with Latest iOS 11.3 Update Issue

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Uh-oh! Apple is, once again, in big trouble. The culprit in this new issue is its latest iOS 11.3 update.

Released at the end of March, Apple's latest iOS 11.3 software update produced a problem to device owners. Instead of improving the software experience of Apple users, the iOS 11.3 update seemed to be a nightmare.

Before the issue was discovered, the iOS 11.3 update was believed to be an important update that was intended to give iPhone and iPad users more control over their devices and have more transparency. Unfortunately, the latest update botched the touch functionality of iPhone 8 devices that have already had a screen replacement handled by a third-party operator.

Reported by Motherboard, the latest iOS update displays the home screen but does not respond to touch input.

The issue seems to be a large scale problem as many third-party repair businesses have complained about the software. Injured Gadgets CEO, Aakshay Kripalani, has even complained about this issue causing his company over 2,000 reshipments. Now it seems like Apple is deliberately doing this so that customers don't have an option to go to a third-party repair shop.

So how is it possible for the display to get affected by a software update? Isn't the display part of the iPhone's hardware?

As explained by iOutlet repair owner, Michael Oberdick, each iPhone display comes with a small microchip that powers it from within. Oberdick claims Apple is able to detect any third-party replacement displays through this microchip.

To back up Oberdick's theory, Apple has listed this down on the release notes of its iOS 11.3 update. Since iOS 11.3 was released to fix the broken touchscreen functionality caused by iOS 11.0.2 on third-party iPhone 6S displays, it looks like the new update has affected more devices than before.

The release notes of iOS 11.3 reads:

"Addresses an issue where touch input was unresponsive on some iPhone 6S displays because they were not serviced with genuine Apple parts."

This proved that Apple was capable of detecting third-party screen replacements.

In the last six months, repairs have been done to fix broken iPhone 8 screens without any problem. There was, however, something in the update that killed the functionality of touch on the devices. And although third-party suppliers could work out the issue, it meant re-opening the device and upgrading its chip.

There is so much pressure on device owners to have their broken iPhones be fixed at official Apple Stores and use expensive official Apple parts. Hopefully, Apple releases an iOS 11.3.1 update to fix these broken displays real soon. Otherwise, it could lead to a series of issues with Apple's whole business strategy (remember the battery throttling case?) that led to a host of government investigations throughout the world.

And yes, the "Right to Repair" legislation needs to be approved the soonest time possible.


Source: Motherboard

33 comments:

Comment Page :
  1. Apple knows their users will keep on buying their products no matter what, so Apple has no incentive to change their behavior.

    ReplyDelete
  2. SpanishInquisitionApril 11, 2018 at 3:43 AM

    Business Insider printed an article about a recent Piper Jaffray "Teens Survey" asking over 6,000 teenagers (avg 16 years old) across 40 states about their smartphone preference.

    Of those who owned a phone (they may have left that stat out) 82% said they owned an iPhone. Only 11% were Team Android.

    84% of teens said their next phone would be an iPhone.

    That's pretty good news for Apple, but I didn't dive into the number crunching to see how the percentages may have been manipulated. That would make an interesting article.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Why are teens being surveyed? Wait until mommy and daddy stop paying for phones and then ask them what their next phone is going to be, when they themselves have to pay for it.

      Delete
    2. Probably an Apple product. The SE can be had for free (MetroPCS) or very inexpensively (<$150). Apple have been targeting the education market for decades for just this reason.

      Delete
    3. Teens don't seem to like Android much at all. And more are buying Apple; last Fall's survey showed 78% owned iPhones, vs. 82% in the latest survey.
      Also, 20% of the surveyed teens owned an Apple Watch, more than double the 10% in the Fall 2016 survey.
      Clearly Apple is doing a much better job of attracting young cellphone owners.

      Delete
  3. So, unless you have an iPhone 8 with a counterfeit replacement screen, there is no problem with 11.3? Good to know, thanks!

    I wonder how many of the people who paid for a screen replacement or bought a "refirbished" phone expected to get a counterfeit screen instead of genuine Apple part? Thank god Apple is protecting the consumer by using the measures described in this article. Do Samsung and other Android phone manufacturers provide this kind of protection?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So you are going on the record supporting an anti-competitive practice? Because as Dennis has pointed out below, if someone wanted to get a non-"counterfeit" screen as per your definition, the only place they can do that is...Apple.

      Delete
    2. Samsung sells replacement screens to any retailer/consumer. Same with LG. So with those manufactures, you won't be able to find a 'counterfeit' screen if you purchase the phone from a reputable retailer/repair facility.

      Delete
    3. Samsung voids your warranty if you install an aftermarket screen.
      Apple does not void the warranty on a pre-iPhone 8 with aftermarket screen.

      Delete
    4. @Anon418, unless Samsung can show it was that aftermarket screen that caused the problem you're invoking the warranty over, it's illegal. And the burden of proving the relationship is on them.

      Delete
  4. Apple - enemy of the consumer & a free market. Largest contributor to lobbyists paid to oppose right to repair legislate in USA state legislatures.

    ReplyDelete
  5. You are missing the big picture. Apple should block the installation of cheap screens that could degrade the user experience.
    I buy used iPhones. I don't want one with a cheap replacement screen, and I don't want to fight with sellers over this issue.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 3rd party repair shops have no choice but to use non-Apple screens. Apple won't sell their replacement screens to you or to 3rd party shops.

      Delete
    2. So if anyone doesn't subscribe to your way of thinking they are just out of luck eh? "Apple experience" my arse... just a way to shake down the sheeple.

      Dale

      Delete
    3. Apple's blocking of cheap screens is an excellent anti-theft practice.
      Thieves and their customers are not going to take the stolen phone to an Apple store or an Authorized third-party repair center to get the screen replaced.

      No one has to use the Apple Store. An Authorized third-party shop will fix the iPhone right, with an Apple screen.

      Delete
    4. @Anon113, did you even read Dennis' comment up above, at least the first sentence of it?

      "3rd party repair shops have no choice but to use non-Apple screens."

      Delete
    5. Dennis fails to mention there are many third-party shops authorized by Apple to repair iPhones. With Apple parts, tools, Apple-trained techs and repair manuals.

      Delete
    6. True. I just checked the Apple support tool. I have 12 third-party companies within 37 miles of my zip code that can replace an iPhone screen. Plus several apple stores. I don’t need more places, especially if they aren’t qualified to do a proper repair.

      Delete
    7. Dennis doesn't need to mention third-party shops authorized by Apple to repair iPhones if they don't repair screens, which is what this comment tree is about...

      Delete
    8. All third-party shops authorized by Apple to repair iPhones ARE authorized to repair or replace screens.

      I agree that Dennis doesn't need to mention the fact that people have a choice of third-party Apple-authorized iPhone repair sources today. Perhaps it just wasn't convenient when advocating right-to-repair legislation.

      Delete
  6. Looks like Error 53 v2.0

    ReplyDelete
  7. "REEEEEEEE I'M TOO MUCH OF A BASIC TO LEAVE BIG APPLE NO MATTER HOW MANY SHINERS HE GIVES ME BECAUSE I'M IN LOVE WITH HIS STATUS"

    That's your choice and nobody else's.

    Either love Big Apple or leave him, but don't pretend he'll turn over a new leaf if you get the feds on his ass.

    He'll either come to hate you and treat you even worse, or he'll become a shadow of his former self and you'll dump him for the next company that treats you like crap.

    Honestly though, right to repair isn't even needed when you alrwady have the right to just get an Android instead.

    "REEEEEE BUT ANSROID ISN'T STYLISH, EXCITING OR WORSHIPPED"

    Nope. It's an empowering and reliable OS that'll make Goog- I mean "you" the master of your own mobile destiny, which is why (studies have shown) women prefer to be at the mercy of the Big Apple while men cozy up to their ride or die droids.

    It's both a fact and a multi-faceted anecdote, one that shouldn't surprise anyone.

    Now if you'll excuse me, my droids and I have a dinner date with a fine piece of sirloin.

    "REEEEEE I CAN ONLY AFFORD ONE IPHONE AND CAN'T EVEN COVER THE COST TO FIX IT, OR EVEN TAKE ITS BUSTED SCREEN OUT TO A FANCY DINNER"

    #iSheepleProblems

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You deserve a Samsung S7 or S7 Edge for this rant.

      Just one thing: you practically have to destroy it to repair it.

      Delete
    2. Since when do you practically have to destroy a Samsung S7 Edge in order to be able to repair it? Plenty of people have replaced displays and batteries without turning their phones into a pile of rubbish. When the battery in mine becomes marginal I wouldn't give a second thought to opening it up and repairing it.

      Dale

      Delete
    3. I use both iOS and Android. iPhone is my reliable, safe, secure, encrypted daily driver. It is a pleasure to use, everything works exceptionally well and I enjoy it greatly. Android feels half baked and clunky in comparison. I still use a dual SIM Android phone every day because Apple does not offer a dual SIM phone and there is some specific functionality that I utilize on Android that is not available on iOS, such as automation (macros) and OTG USB connection. For everyday tasks I cannot use Android -- there are just too many issues and annoyances. Audiobooks don't play right, internet radio apps don't pause during phone calls, conference call apps don't work properly, etc., etc. My iPhone always works right, I love it. Android is certainly usable in a pinch, but I would not want to use it for my primary phone.

      Delete
    4. It takes up to 2 hours to replace the screen on the S7 Edge. You need a heat gun and special tools if you don't want to break it. Replacing the USB port would require the display to be removed, which would likely result in its destruction per iFixit. Also, replacing the glass without destroying the display may be impossible, they say.

      The Galaxy S7 Edge got a repairability score of 3 out of 10 (10=easiest). Same grade the Galaxy S6 Edge earned.

      Delete
  8. Incredible, Apple won't sell screens to 3rd party facilities then tries to block the aftermarket screens install too. How do the fanboys put up with this blatant anti-competitive? This is just another reason to stay with 'Open Android.'

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's probably a matter of economics. Rich Apple owners won't mind having to go to the Apple store for repairs since they can afford it. Too bad for those who can't afford genuine Apple store I guess.

      Delete
    2. It's good to know that Apple does not sell genuine parts to non-authorized repair shops or end users. I really don't like counterfeit parts. I once bought an aftermarket transmission filter at autozone and after spending two hours on my back under my car it just would not fit -- it was missing a cutout at the right place. I was furious. No more aftermarket parts for me. The savings are just not worth it.

      Delete
    3. I agree. I tried to go low price once when I had an iPhone with a cracked screen. Mailed it to Chicago. Got a discount for replacing battery at the same time. The shop installed a used battery and a cheap screen that did not repel fingerprints. They insulted me when I complained ("You can't read - my ad did not say new OEM Apple parts"). Never again. I'm not going to take a chance with a low-bid shop that might break something in my phone rushing to make more money, even if they use genuine parts.
      I have a good Apple-authorized shop nearby that charges reasonable prices and will do several iPhone repairs while I wait. There are many other good phone repair shops that would do a good job if right-to-repair laws were passed. But many people will buy low-price like I once did and get ripped off. It's not worth the risk, just to make all independent shops and their lobbyists richer. And of course, Apple will be blamed and sued when the improperly fixed iPhones don't work right. When that happens, they will make only sealed, throw-away iPhones with components soldered in place. And iPhone owners will pay more, not less.

      Delete
  9. Disabling 3rd party screens could be necessary in order to prevent possible security breaches. Even disassembly should be considered a security breach unless authorized.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You have to move the Home button/sensor over to any replacement screen, since it's matched to the phone. At least this repair is fairly easy once you heat/soften the glue that makes the iPhone 7 waterproof. This phone rates a 7 out of 10 for repairability from iFixit.

      Delete
  10. More and more evidences, Apple has Planned obsolescence in mind, that is bad ethics and pratice once greedy get over.

    ReplyDelete
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