Home - , , - Cricket Expands Hotspot Data Add-On Without Changing Price

Cricket Expands Hotspot Data Add-On Without Changing Price

cricket-wireless-hotspot-add-on-increased
Cricket Wireless, an AT&T-owned prepaid brand, has made some changes to its 4G LTE hotspot data add-on. Instead of the original 8GB hotspot data that it offered, the add-on now includes 10GB of high-speed data.

The best thing about this new change is that the price of the add-on remains at $10 per month.

This LTE hotspot data add-on can be purchased for use with any of Cricket Wireless' hotspot compatible plans. Right now, the prepaid brand offers two options under this and they come in this pricing structure:


  • $55 per month - comes with unlimited talk, text and 3Mbps data (video streaming is 1.5Mbps)
  • $60 per month - comes with unlimited talk, text, and 8Mbps data 

These two plans already come with unlimited texting to 38 countries, as well as free text, talk and data roaming while traveling in Canada or Mexico. Data deprioritization occurs when over 22GB of data has been consumed before the billing cycle is over. The add-on hotspot data decreases its speed to 2G once the 10GB high speed allotment has been consumed. 

It's important to remember that mobile hotspot is not available on all devices. Only select phones include it. 


Source: BestMVNO

Tags: , ,

34 comments:

Comment Page :
  1. Still throttled, doesn't matter

    ReplyDelete
  2. Good news. Tmobile One55 is a great plan. 2 lines unlimited for a customer aged 55 for $70. Includes hotspot and over 100 countries of data and calling.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Postpaid...

      Delete
    2. Tmobile One55 is an ageist plan offering. Plus, postpaid.

      Delete
    3. You must be confused. Ageist plans aren't banned here, only ageist comments.
      Besides, the Tmo 55+ plan is only half-ageist, unlike Sprint's.
      If you talk real nice to one of your senior elders, they might let you have the second line. You could help pay them back for feeding, clothing, educating you, and letting you live in the basement all those extra years (and raiding the frig.).
      Just remember, you'll be a senior one day if you stay alive. Then you can enjoy your own ageist plan. You will have earned it. Tmo and Sprint know you'll probably use less/month, so the discount is no big deal for them.

      Delete
    4. "Good news. Tmobile One55 is a great plan."

      Except the T-Mobile network is only two-thirds as good as the network Cricket is on.

      Which means it's a lot more likely you will be able to use your hotspot on Cricket than on T-Mobile

      Delete
    5. Faulty math, if you even used math. T-Mobile covers >2.2M sq miles now. Verizon says they cover 2.4M, and their network is bigger than AT&T's.
      Nobody wants a 'speed-crippled' network if they don't have to have one. They're certainly not going to pay MORE for it, and then pay even MORE for hotspot. Especially when they don't need extra coverage.

      Delete
    6. "Especially when they don't need extra coverage."

      The meme of people not really needing good coverage, and even calling decent coverage "Extra" is only found from networks that are way behind, and their fanboy defenders. The networks that DO have good coverage just provide it, and you won't get them evading by saying people don't need good coverage.

      Delete
    7. "Verizon says they cover 2.4M, and their network is bigger than AT&T's."

      Try again. The numbers you are quoting refer only to LTE. Not the entire network. It looks like you are cooking things to make your case.

      Delete
    8. @Anonymous May 26, 2018 at 11:54 AM What's your source for "T-Mobile covers >2.2M sq miles now". Based on eyeballing T_mobile native coverage maps that doesn't seem possible.

      Delete
    9. If ever there was a "phony war" in mobility, this is it.

      Carriers wage advertising wars over who has the "most coverage" or "most LTE" coverage, implying that "most coverage" is or ought to be for consumers the critical reason to choose one carrier or the other.

      The reason it's all phony: the vast majority of mobile subscribers, most of the time, use their cell phones mainly in one relatively small area around their home or possibly two areas, around home and work, and the route between them. Most of the time, a "mobile" user is one who moves within a relatively small area.

      Even "mobile professionals" rarely travel extensively, frequently, and randomly all over the country or even over a large region.

      Dennis' advice is still the best: Consider your needs, consult coverage maps in those areas, ask friends, neighbors and co-workers about their experience and then pick the best plan to meet your needs.

      S: Network World

      Delete
    10. My home & work is on the "road" (waterway "roads" & ocean really). Most signal coverage (not data speed) is important and saves me money in the end (don't have to use satellite).

      I don't think I'm an odd man out example. Signal in more places still matters to a lot if people.

      Delete
    11. "I don't think I'm an odd man out example. Signal in more places still matters to a lot if people."

      You aren't the odd man out: in fact, having good coverage overrides all other concerns for the overwhelming majority of cell customers.

      This is why customers for the two carriers now with good national coverage total twice the customer totals for all other (poor coverage) carriers combined.

      People just want their phones to work. There is no "extra coverage."

      Delete
  3. Eh, I'd rather get truly unlimited on my phone.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And which carrier is offering that?

      Delete
    2. How is this not truly unlimited?

      Delete
    3. @Here or There: throttled speeds

      (I am anon625)

      Delete
    4. Unlimited 3 Mbps or 8 Mbps is still unlimited. I'm not following your reasoning.

      Delete
    5. "And which carrier is offering that?"

      Knowing Boost, you can go into a Boost store front and the 20-something clerk there will promise you that Boost has infinite coverage with infinite bandwidth and infinite speed.

      Delete
  4. Select phones as in only a very small handful of the newest handsets. Most cricket branded phones sold no longer support it. Having to upgrade your existing Cricket phone just to be compatible with hotpot is ludicrous.

    ReplyDelete
  5. If you want unltd hotspot on Cricket just get the $60 plan on an unlocked phone

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That doesn't work on all unlocked phones. Motorola phones, for example, will try to get permission from the carrier before allowing you to use the built in hotspot.

      Delete
  6. If you must be on cricket and trying to stream movies,then screen mirror the phone to tv, roku, fire stick and some blueray players. Uses wifi-direct. No need for a router.
    The following phones on cricket support screen mirroring:
    Alcatel Idol 3, Idol 4. They call it wifi display;
    HTC Desire 555;
    Galaxy Halo (J7);
    I suspect the Huawei Elate does also.
    Save the $10 (hotspot), watch on the big screen from the sofa. Enjoy unlimited data. Who needs cable or big isp?

    ReplyDelete
  7. if you do want to use LTE only, Verizonhas 2.34 million square miles of LTE network coverage. AT&T has nearly 600,000 square miles less LTE coverage than Verizon, T-Mobile has nearly 1 million square miles less than Verizon, and Sprint has nearly 1.5 million square miles less than Verizon.

    Even by the metric you have chosen Verizon is significantly larger than any of it's competitors.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nobody needs an Anonymous blogger to tell them what coverage they need.

      Delete
    2. The numbers you copied from Verizon are almost 2 years old.
      Just like the old, misleading Verizon commercial that used old T-Mobile coverage.
      "It looks like YOU are cooking things to make your case."

      Delete
    3. Do you have a source for current square mile coverage numbers for any US carrier?

      Delete
    4. This is hard to find, since carriers report coverage in POPS. EG, both Verizon and T-Mobile say they cover 322M POPS now, and T-Mobile says they will have 325M covered by end 2018.
      Verizon's latest website claim is that they cover 2.4M square miles. A Verizon VP stated in March that they cover 400,000 more square miles than AT&T, as reported on March 18 here:
      https://www.phonearena.com/news/Verizon-cites-square-miles-coverage-vs-AT-T-FirstNet-respondents-network_id103177
      I don't really trust Verizon's coverage comparisons based on past claims that were debunked, but I haven't found a rebuttal from AT&T yet. Their coverage will expand greatly as they deploy FirstNet Band 14, and new tower/small cell locations could be shared for commercial use.
      The last report I saw from T-Mobile was 2M square miles, months ago. I think it was from their CTO. Will look for that when I have time.

      Delete
  8. Dennis, the 2.4 million square mile figure given for Verizon for all coverage is actually the figure for just LTE....

    That's the only number there that seems to correspond to reality. But even then the statistic is attached to the wrong label. I'm guessing that the person who made the comment was making up the rest of the numbers as they were typing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is the made-up number that started the click-bait game: "Except the T-Mobile network is only two-thirds as good as the network Cricket is on."
      No qualification, source or basis for that claim, so it worked and game on ;-)

      Delete
    2. "2.4 million square mile figure given for Verizon for all coverage is actually the figure for just LTE...."
      Why do you say that? The current Verizon webpage (linked to this site) just says 'coverage.' The March comparison to AT&T (400K square mile difference) just compared 'coverage.'
      Regardless, Verizon says they have deployed LTE across virtually their entire network. The latest 4Q 2017 OpenSignal nation-wide test of 6 Billion connections found an LTE signal 92.7% of the time (vs 93.1% for Tmo) .

      Delete
    3. "This is the made-up number that started the click-bait game: "Except the T-Mobile network is only two-thirds as good as the network Cricket is on."

      This is actually the most concrete of all the statements being thrown around. There is still a significant coverage gap between the T-Mobile network and the AT&T network.

      I also think you have no idea what c
      "clickbait" means. None of the claims being made here actually has a click link associated with it. Go ahead I dare you to click to your heart's content all over the place...

      If any of the claims of coverage here have caused you to go to any dubious websites containing ads, it is through your own incredibly clumsy use of a browser, and not anything any of us commenters have done.

      Delete
  9. "Nobody needs an Anonymous blogger to tell them what coverage they need."

    Which perfectly fits you telling everyone that they should settle for poor coverage.

    ReplyDelete
  10. "Nobody needs an Anonymous blogger to tell them what coverage they need."

    No, but based on the figures accurately reflected by the commenter at May 26, 2018 at 4:11 PM, people overwhelmingly make the choice to go with the carriers with good coverage instead of with the carriers with poor coverage. Because no matter how much you claim otherwise, people actually need good coverage. And good coverage is fundamental, not "extra".

    ReplyDelete
Comment Page :


All comments must be approved before they will appear. The following types of comments will not be approved: off topic comments, insults or personal attacks directed at other commenters, bigotry, hate, sexism and profanity.