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T-Mobile Recommended to Stop Using 'Best Unlimited Network' Tagline on Ads

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After numerous instances of giving itself the title of 'Best Unlimited Network', it looks like T-Mobile may no longer be allowed to use it.

Earlier today, the National Advertising Division (NAD) recommend the wireless carrier to stop using this accolade in its advertising campaigns. The recommendation comes after the regulatory body reviewed a complaint filed by AT&T.

In its recommendation, the division explained that while carriers are free to promote the benefits that its customers can get, they should be able to back up their claims; especially if it's a comparative one.

The purpose for doing so is that they avoid misleading their customers. This also helps maintain a level playing field among all providers.

Under its 'Best Unlimited Network' campaign, T-Mo uses the six network awards it won from OpenSignal back in August 2017. OpenSignal presented T-Mobile with this prestigious award based on Ookla's Q3 2017 data that pointed to T-Mobile as having the fastest LTE download and upload speeds. This allowed the carrier to argue that its superior latency and 4G availability was the best choice for users of unlimited high-speed data.

Unfortunately, AT&T was unhappy with the results of the tests gathered by OpenSignal and Ookla. The carrier pointed out that these tests were "a poor fit for the challenged claim."

Using AT&T's complaint, the NAD reviewed the results of the test and discovered that T-Mo's evidence is not suitable with the claim made by the 'Best Unlimited Network'. The regulatory board believed that the wireless carrier did not provide substantial evidence that they offered a better network for talk or text services, and high-speed data. They also believed that the unlimited plan features offered by the carrier were elements of their plan and not the network. As a result, the advertising regulatory board has decided not to support the 'Best Unlimited Network' claim made by T-Mobile.

In response to the NAD's decision, T-Mo argued that its customers valued them for having the fastest data speeds over other attributes. But again, the NAD believes there is no evidence to support the claim made by the wireless network.

Even though the recommendation made by the NAD is not binding, T-Mobile is planning to appeal the decision to the National Advertising Review Board.

To be clear, this is not the first time the wireless network did not get any support from NAD. Last fall, regulators from the board recommended that T-Mobile stop claiming it had the fastest 4G LTE network. This recommendation comes after the NAD received a complaint from Verizon. At that time, the carrier agreed to comply with the decision.

Read the full recommendation here.



Source: TmoNews

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7 comments:

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  1. Wouldn't touch em with a 10 foot pole...............

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  2. I had att,cricket,verizon and metropcs. And let me say here in Michigan Tmobile/Metropcs is far superior in speeds.....m

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  3. sounds like NAD has many lobbyists supporting att and verizon... a shame bc in my daily experience compared to my friends and family TMobile really is the fastest

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    1. If "fastest" is what T-Mobile means, they should say that; obviously, there's a word for it. But "best" can be reasonably construed to indicate "coverage, speed and reliability," and there T-Mobile is NOT the "best."

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  4. No, signal, no cry.

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  5. Switched to T-mobile and I don't regret it. Love the best unlimited network!!

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  6. Maybe they should try "Best Unlimited Network in the Cities", cause in rural areas it sucks...

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