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Verizon Prepaid Expands International Travel Pass to 18 Caribbean Destinations

Caribbean Islands Map
Verizon Prepaid has expanded it's Travel Pass international roaming program to the Caribbean island countries of Anguilla, Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba, Barbados, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent & Grenadines, Turks & Caicos and to the US territories of Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. Until now, Travel Pass was only available in Canada and Mexico.

The prepaid Travel Pass, which Verizon launched in February, lets Verizon Prepaid monthly plan users make unlimited calls and texts to the US and to the country you are in while roaming internationally in the Travel Pass counties. You also get data but I'm not sure how much. Verizon's Prepaid International Plans page says you get data "Based on your monthly plan allowance." But the Prepaid TravelPass FAQs page says you are limited to 512 MB of high speed roaming data per day.

Unfortunately, Travel Pass is rather pricey, $5 per 24 hours in Canada, Mexico, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands and $10 per 24 hours in the other countries. The fee is only charged on days when the phone is used to make or receive a call, send a text or use data in one of the supported countries. You need to enable Travel Pass using the My Verizon app or website. Verizon recommends that you enable Travel Pass before leaving the US. You also need to have a sufficient balance in your prepaid account to cover the daily fee.

$5 a day for roaming in Canada, Mexico, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands is outrageous compared with what many of Verizon's competitors charge. AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint have native coverage in Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands so there's no extra charge for using them or their MVNOs in those US territories.  Canadian roaming is free with some Cricket, T-Mobile Prepaid and AT&T Prepaid plans and costs $5/month on MetroPCS. Mexican roaming is also free on selected AT&T Prepaid, Cricket and T-Mobile Prepaid plans, all GoSmart plans, all Simple Mobile plans and all Telcel America plans and costs $5/month on Boost and MetroPCS.

With Travel Pass you are paying a substantial premium for the convenience of being able to use your phone and your US phone number while traveling internationally.  As long as you are staying in foreign country for at least a couple of days it's almost always less expensive to use a local prepaid SIM.

The one travel scenario where Travel Pass might make sense is you are going on a Caribbean cruise. Most cruises visit a different island country every day and port stops are usually less than12 hours. You'd probably rather spend your limited time swimming, snorkeling and sightseeing rather than hunting for SIMs. You might not even save money with local SIMs as even in the Caribbean most SIMs are only a good deal on the island where they are bought with much higher roaming rates on other islands.

Source Verizon via Phone Scoop, map image: Wikimedia Commons

28 comments:

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  1. Big red ripping people off?

    Nothing new here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not really. It can't be called a "rip-off" if they charge what they say they will charge and deliver what they will promise to deliver for such payment.

      It's not an outrage for a company to provide a much better product for a higher price, even if you want to scream bloody murder about it because you're too much of a skinflint to pay for it.

      Delete
    2. "Big red ripping people off?"

      Do you have evidence of anything like Verizon taking payment for a promised product and not delivering? If not, your references to "ripoff" come across as nothing but Internet troll histrionics with no evidence to back it up.

      Delete
  2. Wow not competitive at all

    ReplyDelete
  3. KnowRoaming rocks in 125 countries! Best choice while traveling

    ReplyDelete
  4. BiG Red knows their customers. They know they are dumb enough to pay mucho bucks for regular US mainland service, so why not make mega bucks when those same people travel?

    ReplyDelete
  5. You get what you pay for: Verizon still has a much better network in the US. Paying more to get more certainly isn't "dumb".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Verizon's network quality is of little relevance overseas. Personally, its not much better than T-Mobile, often worse.

      Delete
    2. Very much true but the above comments were smearing those who pay more to get more in the US with Verizon is fools in some way.

      And even when T-Mobile has great deals and coverage overseas, the problem is when they bring their phones back to the US they are using them on a network that's about 2/3 as good as Verizon's.

      Delete
    3. The world is SO much bigger than Verizon!

      Delete
    4. T-Mobile now has a better network than Verizon. They made BIG improvements over the previous quarter, while Verizon and AT&T just treaded water.
      Source, State of Mobile Networks: USA (January 2018), Open Signal.
      6 Billion measurements over 3 months.

      Delete
    5. "Better"?
      No, not in my current experience. The huge 0 signal areas of tmo native network have not shrunk to this day for me in the past 14 montbs. Being "better" in some metric doesn't matter to me when network signal = zero half the time I need service.

      Delete
    6. "Verizon has a much better network in the US" - if this is your experience,consider yourself lucky. Not everyone lives/works/plays where you do...

      Delete
    7. Anybody who lives and works in areas where Tmobile has no coverage is an outlier. They are stuck paying more and getting less with one of the duopoly. The number of those people is shrinking by millions every year; Tmo now covers just as many people as Verizon, 322M. The vast majority of people stay and travel across in small areas almost all the time, and don't expect to travel long distances on rural roads where very few people live (per Network World). So differences in rural coverage in other areas are irrelevant for them. This is one big reason why Tmobile has been capturing almost all of the net new phone customer growth over the past 3 years. More and more people decide that they don't want to pay extra or give up plan benefits for coverage they probably won't ever need. They get a better network and better value for their needs with T-Mobile. Smart.

      Delete
    8. "Tmo now covers just as many people as Verizon, 322M". That's impossible unless you include roaming. Here's T-Mobile's own map of its native coverage:
      maps.t-mobile.com/pcc.html?map=mvno-noroam-34l. Most of the white no-coverage areas are covered by Verizon.

      Delete
    9. "Verizon has a much better network in the US" - if this is your experience,consider yourself lucky. Not everyone lives/works/plays where you do..."

      Not "lucky", but very typical. The cellular experience on a better network is much better than on a poor network.

      Delete
    10. ""Better"?
      No, not in my current experience. The huge 0 signal areas of tmo native network have not shrunk to this day for me in the past 14 montbs. Being "better" in some metric doesn't matter to me when network signal = zero half the time I need service."

      Correct. The guy who keeps saying that the network that only works in a fraction of the area of other networks.... the area where Americans live, work, play, and travel, is somehow "better" than other networks is only blowing smoke.

      Delete
    11. "Anybody who lives and works in areas where Tmobile has no coverage is an outlier"

      Those who use their phones ONLY in their house or office/factory are the true outliers. A tiny group. The rest of us use our phones in places in between. T-Mobile simply doesn't meet the needs of the vast majority of cell customers at this time.

      Delete
    12. "More and more people decide that they don't want to pay extra or give up plan benefits for coverage"

      Truth be told, the number of people who decide NOT to pay "extra" to actually have their phones work where they need them (the real issue) is really rather small... And it's hardly adds up at all.

      The misleading T-Mobile growth stats ignore the much much larger numbers of people who simply choose Verizon or AT&T over T-Mobile quarter after quarter after quarter... With the total-number change being small enough to the point where it will probably take decades for T-Mobile to reach the size of Verizon at the current growth rate.

      Of course the growth rate might really take off once T-Mobile moves from its current poor coverage to true good nationwide coverage like Verizon and AT&T have. But it's not there yet, and there's no need to pretend that it is.

      Delete
    13. "No, not in my current experience. The huge 0 signal areas of tmo native network have not shrunk to this day for me in the past 14 months".

      Unless you have a band 71 phone, T-Mobile network coverage growth has been at a standstill and remains poor considering the needs of most Americans.

      This should change within a couple of years, with there being a lot more good phones with band 71 and T-Mobile having filled in a lot of the band 71 coverage to go with it as well.

      But if you're looking for something like great coverage from T-Mobile right now, you might as well walk away and come back in a couple of years. If you are like the vast majority of Americans, the coverage will simply not meet your needs.

      Delete
    14. The nutty notion that people only consider coverage to be good for them if it covers the entire USA is silly.
      Most new phone customers who shop around and are not easily mislead by Verizon or AT&T salesmen buy the coverage they need for the areas they visit. And T-Mobile captures almost all net new customers.
      T-Mobile has captured many customers from Verizon and especially AT&T. Positive porting ratios for years against these two. Legacy duopoly customers stay for a variety of reasons, not just the simplistic reason, coverage. Surveys have reported that many people don't want the hassle of porting lines on family plans. They are "too busy" to investigate alternatives, even though most people were interested to find other carriers that could save them money. Many people did not want to buy new phones or did not know whether they had to. Many others said switching was "complicated" and their current carrier was meeting their needs, so they planned to stay even though they thought they were paying too much.

      Delete
    15. "Unless you have a band 71 phone, T-Mobile network coverage growth has been at a standstill and remains poor considering the needs of most Americans.
      This should change within a couple of years, with there being a lot more good phones with band 71 and T-Mobile having filled in a lot of the band 71 coverage to go with it as well."

      People here (maybe you) said the same thing about Band 12 a couple of years ago. T-Mobile quickly deployed virtually all of their Band 12 spectrum, much faster than anyone thought. Band 12 reaches double the distance from the tower, so the edge of coverage expanded greatly and building coverage was greatly enhanced. Signal overlap made Tmo signals much more reliable in Band 12 areas. Tmo also built and rented additional towers to deploy Band 12 in many areas that did not have previous coverage at all. Soon, lots of new phones included Band 12. T-Mobile built >2,500 new stores last year alone, and the great majority of those were in new coverage areas per the CTO.

      The statement that 'coverage growth has been at a standstill and remains poor..' is just BS. Facts show the exact opposite. Growth will continue as Band 71 rolls out. But only a small percentage of Americans need to wait for that to have excellent T-Mobile coverage. All the rest can enjoy T-Mobile's superior value right now!

      Delete
    16. " But only a small percentage of Americans need to wait for that to have excellent T-Mobile coverage"

      Hold your horses. There is no such thing as "excellent" T-Mobile coverage Nationwide. The network does not meet the needs of the vast majority of users. 2020 hasn't come yet. The network is still building. It's best not to act like it's all done... There's a long way to go.

      Most people who go with T-Mobile right now will noticee dignificant compromises and problems of the phone just not working on the network, especially compared to Verizon or AT&T.


      Your Fanboy heart should be happy that if T-Mobile keeps up with it's promises, it will have excellent coverage in a couple of years. Will... NOT now.

      Delete
    17. " But only a small percentage of Americans need to wait for that to have excellent T-Mobile coverage"

      This is certainly true in my area. T-Mobile has had the best service of the four in my area ever since they belatedly deployed B4 LTE. In my area, while the other three have just as good of coverage, their networks are more likely to suffer from congestion, high latency and excessive jitter.

      Delete
    18. "There is no such thing as "excellent" T-Mobile coverage Nationwide."
      Not true. Shoppers look at the maps and buy T-Mobile plans with roaming when they think they need that. 'Maximum nationwide coverage' is just a straw-man argument for the Duopoly anyway; it's all they have left. The vast majority of people know they don't need coverage everywhere in the US, so when they shop, they pick a carrier with coverage that meets their own needs. Duopoly postpaid customers who don't shop pay through the nose, mostly for the convenience of not switching. Most of them could be saving money, enjoying a better network experience and getting extra perks with T-Mobile, but they "choose" to do nothing to avoid the switching hassles. The notion that they choose 'maximum nationwide coverage' every month is just silly.

      Delete
  6. "The nutty notion that people only consider coverage to be good for them if it covers the entire USA is silly."

    It's not funny. People just want their phones to That's why Verizon and AT&T get so many more customers but all the other ones to buy.

    Go ahead keep singing the silly song that poor coverage is adequate or even desirable. You look at some people singing along with you. But it's only a small part.

    And a good part of your message was making up fictional reasons to make up for the fact that people over bubbly choose between better networks because these two better networks much better meet their needs.
    ....Fan on, Fanboy. Fan on!

    ReplyDelete
  7. "not just the simplistic reason, coverage."

    I think you don't get it. Coverage is not simplistic. Coverage is King. If your phone doesn't work it's worthless.

    Verizon and AT&T have realized this for a long time. That's exactly why they get the most customers, and it is the main reason.

    T-Mobile doesn't even agree with you. They agree that coverage is king.... That's why their top priority has been to expand as fast as possible to catch up with the two better Networks in the area of coverage.

    So what are you going to do with T-Mobile eventually has adequate coverage 2 years from now? Are you going to switch to Bug tussle and then whine about how good coverage is a bad thing?

    ReplyDelete
  8. Go ahead and talk to any business about how poor coverage is good enough. No, businesses overwhelmingly buy AT&T or Verizon plans for the company phones in their operations. Not Sprint, not T-Mobile, not Bugtussle.

    Why? They want the phones to just work. They don't have any time for such nonsense as claiming that a carrier with the much worse network is good enough. They have to deal with what is real, rather than imaginary claims from shills.

    ReplyDelete
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