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Family Mobile Makes Add A Lines $24.88 On All Plans


Walmart Family Mobile has reduced the price of additional lines on its top two plans. Added lines are now $24.88 per month on all Family Mobile plans. This replaces the $5 per line discount on add a lines that Family Mobile used to offer. Family Mobile has four plans priced from $24.88 to $49.88 per month:

  • $24.88  - unlimited voice minutes, messaging and data with the first 1 GB at high speeds. Additional lines $24.88 (was $19.88)
  • $29.88 - unlimited voice minutes, messaging and data with the first 3 GB at high speeds. Additional lines $24.88 (no change)
  • $39.88 - unlimited voice minutes, messaging and data with the first 9 GB at high speeds. Additional lines $24.88 (was $34.88)
  • $49.88 - unlimited voice minutes, messaging and high speed data, video streams at 480p, no hotspot. Additional lines $24.88 (was $44.88)
These changes apply to new activations only. For better or worse, current multi-line customers are grandfathered and get to keep (or are stuck with) the $5 per added line discount.

Hat tip to Jeff Moore of Wave7 Research for spotting the new add a line pricing on a Walmart store display and sharing the photo above with me. The new pricing is also showing up on the Walmart Family Mobile website.

Walmart Family Mobile is a T-Mobile MVNO that's operated by TracFone and sold exclusively by Walmart.

56 comments:

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  1. Odd pricing..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Prices ending in .88 are an indicator at Costco, Sams Clubs, Target, Walmart, etc., that the price is a special deal or temporary.

      Delete
    2. It's an interesting pricing play by WFM.

      Basically, 3 lines of unlimited LTE become $100, 4 lines $125, 5 lines $150.

      Given that:

      - Mint tops out at 10 GB ($25),

      - Red Pocket T-Mobile tops out at 5 GB ($30), and

      - MetroPCS is $40 each for your first 2 unlimited lines, or $25 only if you have 4 lines

      - and unlimited on America Movil T-Mobile (Straight Talk T-Mobile and Telcel America) is $55,

      this is now one of the better deals out there for unlimited on T-Mobile towers, with multi-line groups -- especially with large groups.

      Also, people are usually much more willing to deal with Walmart stores than with the mom-and-pop MetroPCS authorized retailers that try to rip you off by charging commissions (oops, "activation fees") and pushing you to buy cases and protectors if you want the deal (or claiming to be out of stock on popular free phones).

      I could see the equivalent of Reddit's /r/CricketGroups popping up for the WFM discount lines.

      Delete
  2. do all the lines share the data?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, data is per line on Family Mobile.

      Delete
  3. This is really old news. Its been this way for a while now. Its just the same model as Simple Mobile.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Insert obligatory Tracfone-disparaging comment tinged with subtle xenophobic overtones.

    I think we've all been over this before.

    Great carrier until they screw up your service, then once you get Trac'd you never go back.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Carlos Slim.... Nah

    ReplyDelete
  6. Would these phones work out of the box if I popped in a Tracfone sim that is for T-mobile towers? Or is that just the at&t prepaid phones that work with Tracfone att sim?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Before Walmart sold Family Mobile to Tracfone, it looks like WFM phones could be used with any provider on the T-Mobile network. (Sources 1 and 2)

      After Family Mobile was sold to Tracfone, it now seems that in general, a phone sold by an America Movil/Tracfone brand (like WFM) typically is usable only with other Tracfone brand SIMs (like Tracfone itself) designed for the same underlying network. (Source 3)

      That matches up with other people who've used phones from Total Wireless (a Tracfone brand) on Tracfone or Straight Talk (another Tracfone brand), just by asking customer service -- and sometimes even that is not needed. (Source 4)

      So, in short, it seems that customer service (do the online chat, not service by call-in) would be able to re-brand the WFM phone to Tracfone T-Mobile for you.

      Sources:

      [1] https://www.howardforums.com/showthread.php/1882711-Can-I-use-a-Walmart-Family-Mobile-or-Go-Phone-on-TMobile-prepaid?p=16648458#post16648458

      [2] https://www.howardforums.com/showthread.php/1880444-Will-Walmart-family-phones-work-on-metro?p=16498654#post16498654

      [3] https://www.howardforums.com/showthread.php/1902369-Walmart-Family-Mobile-on-Tracfone?s=38559aa8e13040c041ed623747eeb044&p=16928651#post16928651

      [4] https://www.howardforums.com/showthread.php/1899112-Port-or-Move-Service-from-Total-Wireless-to-Straight-Talk?p=16896722#post16896722

      Delete
  7. Also, notice the fine print in the photo in the red section:

    "Additional lines must be of equal or lesser value."

    So, if your primary line is, say, 3 GB, your $24.88 extra lines cannot be 9 GB or unlimited data.

    But if at least one line in the group is unlimited, all your other lines can benefit and convert into unlimited lines -- just by categorizing your unlimited line as the primary (?)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Why would anyone get these plans over MetroPCS when you can get better (free) phones?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. * Millions of Americans pass through Walmart stores on a monthly (weekly?) basis. A much smaller number pass through MetroPCS stores monthly.

      * Someone pushing a shopping cart through a Walmart, and who's had a few thoughts of unlimited data on their phone (or leaving postpaid), might see this retail display and decide the price is good.

      * MetroPCS stores tend to be located in rundown strip malls that can put people off.

      * Many Americans don't like the hassle of deals that aren't clear, or that change, or that don't always turn out the same. Metro authorized retailer stores can play games with phone availability, and can have pricing based on how many accessories you buy (or can just put you onto a different rate plan than asked for).

      * While WFM phone's aren't free, they don't look to be much worse than the phones / phone prices for other prepaid brands you can buy at Walmart (like for AT&T Prepaid and Verizon Prepaid and Straight Talk). While they're not free like Cricket and Boost and Metro, they're also not horrible or majorly overpriced. And sometimes there are sales on prepaid phones at Walmart that make them more competitive with Cricket/Boost/Metro.

      Delete
    2. It might be hard to believe, but most Walmart shoppers don't read PPPN.
      I suspect that many WFM customers don't want to downgrade their phone to one of the inexpensive models that are "free" on MetroPCS.
      Lots of WFM subscribers would not go through the perceived 'hassle' and expense of switching to Metro even if they learned they could save money on service. WFM may be more convenient for Walmart shoppers when they need help or advice.
      Most wireless customers say in surveys they are interested in saving money on their service, but few actually switch.

      Delete
    3. "Why would anyone get these plans over MetroPCS when you can get better (free) phones?"

      I see Walmart's all over the place, but I rarely ever see Metro PCS stores.

      On top of that, customer service is much better at Walmart than at a MetroPCS store: the Walmart will tend to be open for 24 hours a day in order to serve customers, while the MetroPCS store will be open a fraction of that... Presenting potential customers with a closed sign in the door.

      Delete
    4. Anon 11:25 said:

      > "It might be hard to believe, but most Walmart shoppers don't read PPPN."

      πŸ˜†πŸ˜†πŸ˜†

      PPPN should have a 'Comment of the Week' award. This would definitely win.

      Delete
  9. It might be best to hold off on Metro PCS for the time being. The network is poor compared to AT&T and Verizon and its divisions and MVNO's. Wait until T-Mobile builds out the network, that's still a ways off.

    On postpaid T-Mobile, you can make up for the network being only two-thirds as good by having roaming on to AT&T. But you don't have this option with MetroPCS.

    Don't rely on those who try and fool you when they say that if MetroPCS coverage is good in your house then it is good enough in general. The vast majority of Americans leave their house and hit the road.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "..roaming on to AT&T. But you don't have this option with MetroPCS."

      This is false. MetroPCS has extensive roaming on AT&T and regional carriers.

      Delete
    2. MetroPCS roaming is voice and text only, there's no data roaming. Better than nothing but not a substitute for native coverage with data.

      Delete
    3. "This is false. MetroPCS has extensive roaming on AT&T and regional carriers."

      Data is integral to the 2018 mobile phone experience. MetroPCS does not have data roaming onto anything. So it's actually fairly accurate to simply say it doesn't have roaming.

      This leaves MetroPCS rather crippled and much less useful then any plans that are natively on AT&T and Verizon, or plans from elsewhere that actually have data roaming on to AT&T and Verizon.

      Delete
    4. "The vast majority of Americans leave their house and hit the road."
      According to Network World, the network questions facing a potential subscriber are first whether a given carrier offers the service where the subscriber lives and works, and in some cases regularly travels; and second, what kind of performance is promised, and what is actually delivered.
      The "vast majority of Americans" don't travel extensively and randomly across the whole USA, so comparing carriers' entire nation-wide coverage maps should be irrelevant when picking their carrier.

      Delete
    5. "it's actually fairly accurate to simply say (MetroPCS) doesn't have roaming."
      No, it's still false.

      Delete
    6. The vast majority of Americans indeed do something like that travel extensively across the whole USA.

      Comparing carriers coverage is the first and most relevant thing to do when picking carriers. And the resulting actual customer choice does reflect that the customers want carriers that just work.

      Delete
    7. "The vast majority of Americans indeed do something like that travel extensively across the whole USA."

      Do you have a source for that claim? I think there are a lot of homebodies and people who only travel to one or two preferred destinations.

      I'd love to see some actual statistical research on how much Americans travel and how much of that travel is outside of cities and major highways when all the carriers work.

      Delete
    8. Check this one about the majority of Americans going on vacation within a given year...

      http://news.gallup.com/poll/6112/majority-americans-plan-vacation-summer.aspx

      Add to this a large amount of business travel:

      https://www.creditdonkey.com/business-travel-statistics.html

      The average commute is 25 minutes, with many taking more than an hour (for 11 million workers)

      https://www.creditdonkey.com/commute-statistics.html

      -------------

      Add to this all those misc. trips such as for funerals. Starting with the majority taking vacations and adding the other reasons on, the number of "homebodies", while "a lot", is a definite minority of Americans.

      As for traveling in places "when all the carriers work", Sprint only works well in 10 states and doesn't work at all in thousands of cities. T-Mobile is somewhat better and gaining ground. Again, the vast majority of US cell customers choose the better networks with a much better nationwide presence (even if it costs more) because they want their phones to just work... and not fiddle with coverage maps or put up with the phones being dead due to there being no network.

      And if a carrier works on a "major highway", they don't want a dead phone if they turn off the highway and go 3 miles to a certain restaurant.

      As for cities, there are more than 10,000 in the US, and this is another area where carriers that aren't the top 2 fall short in coverage.

      Delete
    9. Anon 9:22:

      I'm not the earlier poster, but I wanted to point out:

      -- Just because people go on vacation doesn't mean they always go to the boonies/sticks. Many of them vacation in areas with decent cellular coverage by all four carriers, like Washington DC, Las Vegas, Hawaii, Memphis, Miami, New York City, Austin, Tampa, New Orleans, etc.

      And those who drive to Yellowstone / the Catskills / Mount Rushmore / Sequoia / St. Augustine know that they will have crappy coverage. Maybe the family has MetroPCS or Sprint lines, the husband has an AT&T work phone or the wife has a Verizon work phone. So there's some sort of combo of providers available, especially with roaming.

      If they are really in dire need of 24/7 coverage, they'll carry a backup phone for another network, from Walmart or Target, with 1 month of coverage.

      -- Many American commuters live in suburbs or exurbs of major cities, and drive into the city or another suburb each day, and then back. So their coverage will be decent during the commute.

      Back in the 2010 census, more than 80 percent of Americans lived in urban areas. (https://www.reuters.com/article/usa-cities-population/more-americans-move-to-cities-in-past-decade-census-idUSL2E8EQ5AJ20120326)

      That's why the carriers can basically be truthful in saying that they cover 95% + of Americans. Because most Americans live and work in close range of acceptable cell signal.

      Unless they're truckers...

      ---

      Are you trying to make the claim that Americans place a much higher priority on whether they have signal on the highway to Yellowstone National Park versus at work??

      Delete
    10. Most people in the US live, work and vacation in urban areas and resorts where wireless coverage is good. I did a 3-hour limited survey of T-Mobile coverage in March of last year before the Band 12 deployment was complete:
      “There are 497 urban areas in the US, according to the 2010 Census. The 20 smallest urban areas, from Pascagoula, MS to Farmington, NM all have T-Mobile coverage. This leaves about 3,500 more cities (population between 10000 and 50000). I can check the Census and look at those, too. Checking the 20 smallest Census “metro areas” of at least 10,000 people, from Heber, UT to Fairfield IA, only one, Fitzgerald, GA did not have solid coverage (update: it was and is very spotty, but now the population has decreased to 9.053). [Dennis also mentioned Wausau, WI, pop 39,000, which was the only fairly large metro area that did not have coverage]. That leaves about 31,000 towns and villages, with population below 10,000. It sounds like a lot, but many are in suburbs or exurbs of larger urban and metro areas that have T-Mobile coverage.”

      Since T-Mobile now covers more than 322M people (up from 314M in March 2017) with LTE out of 330M in the USA (98%; was 95%+), I expect that virtually all cities have T-Mobile coverage, and a large percentage of towns (below 10,000 people) will as well.
      The vast majority of towns I found last year that did not have T-Mobile coverage were below 5,000 population. I checked again a list I had started (but not finished) last year of towns >5,000 population that did not have coverage. All except one have coverage today, Waynesboro, MS 5197. The 4 Iowa towns on the list now have 4G roaming coverage through a partner.

      T-Mobile has about completed the Bans 12 deployment. They have fielded Band 71 to more than 823 cities and towns. A large majority of their subscribers have postpaid agreements, and all T-Mobile branded plans include at least voice and text roaming (most include limited data roaming).

      If people have a T-Mobile branded plan and are traveling this summer on business or pleasure, the likelihood of them being in a city, town or village where your phone won't work with cellular service is very small. And of course, they can check coverage maps before they visit small rural towns, since they can't always depend on WiFi. I use the 'Coverage?' map app popular with RV travelers. You can overlay 1-4 carriers in any area of the USA to compare coverage for your whole trip, and specify the type of coverage to compare: LTE, 4G, 3G, 2G and Roaming.

      Delete
    11. "That's why the carriers can basically be truthful in saying that they cover 95% + of Americans. Because most Americans live and work in close range of acceptable cell signal."

      All carriers cover all 350,000,000 Americans. But T-Mobile covers a third less of the places where these Americans use their phones than those who use AT&T or Verizon.

      "Are you trying to make the claim that Americans place a much higher priority on whether they have signal on the highway to Yellowstone National Park versus at work??"

      Americans want a network that JUST WORKS. With T-Mobile being only two-thirds as good as the better networks, such questions as you pose are a LOT more likely!

      Delete
    12. "That's why the carriers can basically be truthful in saying that they cover 95% + of Americans. Because most Americans live and work in close range of acceptable cell signal."

      Once they leave the workplace and home or hit any streets or roads in between, or go to the mall, etc, their phone won't work on T-Mobile... so that is why most of them will go with Verizon and AT&T.

      Delete
    13. "Once they leave the workplace and home or hit any streets or roads in between, or go to the mall, etc, their phone won't work on T-Mobile... so that is why most of them will go with Verizon and AT&T."
      False and misleading statements that are repeated over and over on PPPN.
      1. If your phone works in your house or workplace, it's going to work even better outside on streets and roads in the coverage area. That's how radio works.
      2. Verizon and AT&T have more postpaid customers, who have many reasons for not switching. When asked they talk about the hassles of switching family lines, and don't know whether they will have to buy new phones. Coverage is only one of many reasons they give. T-Mobile and Sprint have more prepaid customers. People who want to save money while still getting the coverage THEY think they need. Bloggers who try to mislead them about what coverage they need are only fooling themselves.

      Delete
    14. "Sprint only works well in 10 states and doesn't work at all in thousands of cities."

      Sprint brands’ subscribers and customers of Ting CDMA, Twigby, Tracfone feature phones (and Fi) don’t have to fear the Coverage Bear when they visit Smithsonian’s best 20 small towns for 2018. All towns had Sprint coverage. E.G., tiny Trinidad, California (Pop: 359) and Ocracoke Island (Pop: 948) have blanket coverage. Three small towns in AK, AR and NE rely on roaming coverage (so other MVNO phones won’t work there).

      Delete
    15. I find that in about half the (rural/costal) areas where I go where tmo native = 0 signal sprint native has service.

      Delete
  10. If the data is NOT shared, the family prices are nice. Otherwise, the only plan that's worth is the Unlimited Data...

    ReplyDelete
  11. $40 on WFM gets 9gb with hotspot. On Metro its 5gb.

    I saw the dislay in Walmart, says that WFM is on Tmobile and the galaxy J7 is a CDMA phone. Serious confusing typo.

    ReplyDelete
  12. It's still true to say that MetroPCS doesn't have roaming, In summary. That's because it lacks data roaming which is necessary in today's era. If you would like of course you could put an asterisk after this true statement and explain at the bottom of the page that they do have voice and text roaming. But it's very true that MetroPCS lacks the necessary data roaming that today's users need.

    And it lives and dies, accent on the dies, on the data footprint of thr native T-Mobile network which is still significantly worse than the data networks of AT&T and Verizon.

    Because MetroPCS does not roam.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. MetroPCS is the #1 prepaid brand by far, and has strong subscriber growth every quarter.
      Without their extensive voice and sms roaming coverage, MetroPCS would not be #1.
      Believe it or not, normal people still call and text on their cellphones.

      Delete
    2. "Believe it or not, normal people still call and text on their cellphones."

      If MetroPCS keeps your attitude, Gramps, about the young whippersnappers and their data and dang tweeter and books of faces, MetroPCS will quickly fall away.

      Delete
  13. The least expensive way to improve coverage is to merge with Sprint.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Least expensive for whom?

      Delete
    2. Probably for every cellular customer.

      In the cellular phone era, every merger and loss of a carrier has been answered by a drop in price and significant increase in value.

      Delete
  14. It works within a 200 mile radius of my house. Good enough. The price is right.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Do you live in an area with poor signal from the big carriers?

      Delete
  15. If the coverage works for you, then this is a good deal. If it doesn't work for you, then it's a moot point. But not working for you doesn't mean it can't work for anyone else. Likewise, working for you doesn't automatically mean it is perfect for everyone else.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Why is everyone comparing MetroPCS with AT&T and Verizon? Does WFM have roaming?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It started with Anonymous June 3, 2018 at 11:55 AM, who basically said that people should avoid MetroPCS (or any non-roaming T-Mobile MVNO) -- because even if the T-Mobile signal is good at home, you might be traveling on a rural highway to a funeral once every 7 years and your world will be destroyed if you can't stream a full season of Stranger Things on Netflix in HD at that exact moment πŸ˜‚

      Delete
    2. WFM lacks roaming like MetroPCS does....

      Rolls eyes ... Yes Metro DOES have what passed for roaming in 1998.

      Delete
  17. It's been said Band 71 been rolled out in over 800 cities, but so far non of the UNLOCKED flagship phones have Band 71. Only the T-Mobile versions of some flagship phones have band 71.
    Kinda feels like the "Un-Carrier" is becoming the ANTI-un-carrier

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Band 71 and supported phones will really take off this year, but don't be afraid of the infamous PPPN Coverage Bear warnings. Smithsonian published a list of The 20 Best Small Towns To Visit in 2018. ALL of them, including one with only 359 residents have T-Mobile coverage without Band 71.
      Tiny Ocracoke, North Carolina (Population: 948), on an island at the southern tip of the Outer Banks where Blackbeard was killed has very spotty coverage, though.

      Delete
    2. Unlocked Samsung S9, S9+ and LG V30 phones support Band 71, so you can eat your slap.

      Delete
    3. The coverage bear has stolen the picnic basket of T-Mobile. It's the better coverage of the competitors that is the main reason that people choose the bettervtwo carriers over T-Mobile.

      The Black Beard guy listing the towns forgets the obvious fact that people want their phones to work between towns instead of just inside incorporated limits.

      Go ahead and keep singing the song that bad coverage is good. Most cell customers know what is good for them and they choose to ignore it.

      Even T-Mobile isn't singing this song. They are aware that their coverage is poor, and that is why they are trying very hard to expand to become as good as Verizon as soon as they can within a couple of years.

      They probably smile and shake their head at the shallow shills who pretend that T-Mobile has the coverage of 2021 already during 2018.

      Delete
    4. "Unlocked Samsung S9, S9+ and LG V30 phones support Band 71, so you can eat your slap"

      I am sure all 814 T-Mobile users who have the above devices and venture into the tiny amount of towns and areas with Band 71 now are sitting down to enjoy a nice hot plate of slap-jacks with syrup.

      Delete
    5. "It's been said Band 71 been rolled out in over 800 cities, but so far non of the UNLOCKED flagship phones have Band 71..."

      It's still early days. Too small of an area covered by Band 71 and way too few phones. Stay with your Verizon or AT&T based MVNO for now, and come back to T-Mobile in a few years. In a few years, Band 71 will really take off... And most of the country will have it and most of the phones being sold will support it.



      Delete
  18. "Sprint brands’ subscribers and customers of Ting CDMA, Twigby, Tracfone feature phones (and Fi) don’t have to fear the facts about coverage..."

    They don't have to fear this because they don't care. The number of cellular customers whose needs are met by Sprint about a tiny minority of the total.

    The average American is a coverage bear, and actually wants their phones to work wherever they go. Go ahead and put "we don't work when you need to go to a funeral" in a Sprint ad. Go ahead. And see how many customers you will attract.


    And the only funeral will be for Sprint, which is dying because it doesn't meet the needs of the vast majority of people

    ReplyDelete
  19. "If the coverage works for you, then this is a good deal. If it doesn't work for you, then it's a moot point. But not working for you doesn't mean it can't work for anyone else. Likewise, working for you doesn't automatically mean it is perfect for everyone else."

    Regardless of this excuse, Walmart Family Mobile meets the coverage needs a building a small proportion of Americans.

    Chances are, the coverage from this particular MVNO won't work for you.

    ReplyDelete
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