Home - , , - FCC Now Ready to Listen to Your Thoughts on the T-Mobile-Sprint Proposed Merger

FCC Now Ready to Listen to Your Thoughts on the T-Mobile-Sprint Proposed Merger

fcc-open-comments-sprint-tmobile-merger
Ever since T-Mobile and Sprint announced news that they were merging, there has been mixed reaction from the public.

Among those that have been very vocal about opposing this merger include Peter Adderton, the founder and former CEO of Boost Mobile; and Adam Wolf, president of the National Wireless Independent Dealer Association (NWIDA). The two released a joint statement that talked about their disapproval over this merger deal. In addition to these two executives, lawmakers have also urged for a thorough examination of the merger between the two companies.

It looks like these concerns are not put to waste.

Earlier today, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) have announced that they will be accepting comments and formal petitions of those who are against the $26 billion merger between Sprint and T-Mobile. If you are against this merger, you can send your concerns to the FCC until August 27th.

Once the deadline is met, the two companies (along with their supporters) can file oppositions to the petitions. They are being given until September 17th to make these oppositions. The final round of replies is set to close on October 9th.

According to the report, the FCC will observe a 180-day review timeline. They will use this time to determine whether or not this proposed merger is for the public's interest. Although this is not a strict deadline, the agency only uses it as a guideline. They do not guarantee a decision to be made by then.

The good news to this is that anyone is free to file a petition. But it would be important to see what consumer advocacy groups and industry experts have to say about this proposed merger.



Source: Engadget

Tags: , ,

21 comments:

Comment Page :
  1. "It looks like these concerns are not put to waste."
    The public comment period was not driven by "concerns." It is required under FCC rules.

    I'm glad the comment website will not allow submission by bots. FCC learned their lesson about bots when hundreds of thousands of identical negative comments were submitted by bots during the Net Neutrality comment period (FCC treated these as one comment).

    ReplyDelete
  2. In this case, consumer advocacy groups and industry experts are in the pockets of dealers and the bell twins, respectively.

    The average joe probably won't know or care about this bureaucratic foot-dragging.

    We just want a real 3rd competitor with a widespread 5G network.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Honestly, I can care less about 5G

      Delete
    2. "Honestly, I can care less about 5G"

      ....just like those in the past who said they couldn't care less about horseless carriages, manned flight, the polio vaccine, and smartphones with touch screens

      Delete
    3. 5G? I am more interested in the deployment of more 4G bands and bandwidth. 5G can wait. Since there is no wired broadband competitor here, I also hope to keep four wireless competitors to slow the rise of my wireless home internet costs.

      Delete
    4. It will not benefit consumers to have LESS competition than there is now. The vast majority of Americans live in areas that are fully covered by both T-mobile and Sprint. They have consistently offered better rates than AT&T and Verizon in order to compete effectively and that has been great for consumers. If they are allowed to merge expect to see rates go up at the new company as well as AT&T and Verizon since there will no longer be anyone offering a lower cost that keeps the big two from going completely out of proportion higher. I understand why you want more competition and so do I but when there are these few companies a consolidation will raise prices not lower them ... exactly the way AT&T bought Time Warner promising to lower rates and as soon as the deal went through they began raising all their rates. Those Using MVNOs will see costs go up if the merger goes through as well because the three remaining companies will have less incentive to give them decent rates that they pass on to consumers.

      Delete
    5. "It will not benefit consumers to have LESS competition than there is now."

      The merger would give us more competition. Right now, we have two strong carriers, one weak one, and one hardly worth mentioning that is only as big as it is due to deceptive advertising: 99% as good as Verizon!". I'm not sure how Sprint "better rates" have helped anyone, because no matter how little they charge for it, it only works in a small part of the country and that is never changing. Sure, you can charge a lot less for something that is a lot worse, but that does not "A great deal" make.

      After the merger, we'd have THREE strong carriers. An improvement.

      Delete
  3. "If you are against this merger, you can send your concerns to the FCC until August 27th."
    Yes, that is true. FYI, you can ALSO submit your comments if you SUPPORT the merger and don't have "concerns." Many of the comments submitted are positive. (I guess maybe the writer got confused about the difference between comments and petitions to deny the merger. Two separate things.)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Can someone explain why there is a big fuzz about the merger? They are both mobile brands. What can they possibly do together that they cant do apart? Whats the big threat if they join I mean they still have to follow the same rules.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They can deploy spectrum and equipment to compete with the bell twins, while slashing redundant staff.

      That includes subsidiary MVNO dealers and excess corporate stores.

      So basically, while the average consumer stands to gain and win out alongside Sprint and T-mobile, industry shills with selfish ulterior motives will most likely be on the losing end of this merger.

      That's why it seems like all the propaganda peddlers strangely seem to be on the same page.

      The industry itself is against genuine competition with Verizon and AT&T, at least as far as coverage and capacity go.

      Nobody wants that race to the bottom to take place, especially when it means that the industry will have to work harder and harder to retain customers as price increases and service limitations stand to become severely controversial post-merger.

      After all, the bell twins can no longer laugh off complaints while telling people to go use T-mobile or Sprint, because in a post-merger mobile industry, those consumers may very well do so without a second thought.

      Delete
    2. "What can they possibly do together that they cant do apart?"

      Sprint has huge spectrum resources it's never done much with. T-Mobile wants to use them.

      Delete
    3. "What can they possibly do together that they cant do apart?"

      Raise prices, the rest is just noise.

      Delete
    4. There is virtually no business logic behind the fear that New T-Mobile would raise prices. They will save $6B by combining ops, and spend $40B over the first few years creating the first true, nationwide mobile 5G network. They have far more spectrum for 5G than the other two big carriers. The new 5G network will have about 10X speed and 100X capacity (see charts in FCC filing), so they really need to fill it up with traffic (grab new customers) and keep it filled (low churn) to get their money back. Raising prices will not help them do that. It could get them a little more revenue in the short term, but the other two carriers could hang on to their customers or take them back much easier if New T-Mobile raised prices.

      Sprint and T-Mobile testified under oath and promised in their FCC submission that they would continue to lower prices, and that makes the most sense in view of their business plans and goals.

      Delete
    5. "Sprint has huge spectrum resources it's never done much with. T-Mobile wants to use them."
      Yes, this is 2.5 GHz spectrum that is ideal for 5G speed and capacity. Sprint owns enough of this in 160+ markets for optimum 5G. But T-Mobile owns 600 MHz spectrum across 97+% of the US. This will give the new 5G network broad coverage that Sprint cannot hope to field on its own. Slower speed and capacity, but ultra-low-latency 5G coverage virtually everywhere. Neither AT&T nor Verizon has the breadth and depth of spectrum for a nation-wide 5G network. They both own lots of millimeter wave spectrum for dense urban areas in top markets, but they have to buy a LOT of spectrum in the high-band auctions over the next several years to match New T-Mobile.

      Delete
    6. The only "noise" is the idea that the merger will cause prices to go up.

      Delete
    7. "There is virtually no business logic behind the fear that New T-Mobile would raise prices. They will save $6B by combining ops, and spend $40B over the first few years creating the first true, nationwide mobile 5G network."

      OK, so that $6B saved is more than wiped out by that $40B spent. And you've conveniently left out Sprint's debt. And evidence showing that 4 going to 3 has in fact lowered prices.

      Delete
    8. The loudest and most obnoxious noise expounds the mythical 5G network. I do not want 5G if it means losing one of four national carriers.

      Delete
    9. The merger gives them $6B extra cash early that allows them to invest more, quicker, than they could separately to build a single 5G network; refinance and pay down debt; and reduce prices to grab and retain more customers, all at the same time. It's a compelling business opportunity and will benefit customers.
      Half of Sprint's branded customers already have a phone that is compatible with T-Mobile's network, and Sprint can give access with just a firmware update. T-Mobile already gave Sprint a LTE roaming agreement as of the date of the merger announcement.

      Delete
  5. I think the FCC is probably as "concerned" with citizen comments as they were with the Net Neutrality issue-- not at all, other than plotting ways to ignore and hide the desire of citizens if it disagrees with the bought-and-paid-for decision they'll make behind closed doors.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Will they charge us $225 a Listen?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The comments are free to read on the FCC website. You can also read a copy of the FCC merger filing that has sensitive business information redacted. It's very interesting, and there are revealing pictures for people who don't have the patience to read it.

      Delete
Comment Page :


All comments must be approved before they will appear. The following types of comments will not be approved: off topic comments, insults or personal attacks directed at other commenters, bigotry, hate, sexism and profanity.